Workshops tackle Whakaki catchment erosion and water quality

A SERIES of workshops is under way to tackle erosion and water quality issues in the Whakaki catchment and make it more productive and sustainable.

The Ministry for Primary Industries has identified severe erosion and water quality issues as affecting the long-term social, environmental and economic sustainability of the area.

MPI has partnered with the Whakaki community, including iwi, farmers and foresters, to identify a common vision for the future of the catchment and explore opportunities.

The aim is to stabilise erosion-prone farm land to minimise soil loss into the lake, improve water quality, trial alternative sustainable and economically viable land use options, and enhance the overall living standard of the community.

The workshops follow a series of MPI interviews with Whakaki residents to better understand the community’s future priorities, values and aspirations.

“It has been important to have spent the past couple of months mapping out and analysing what we heard locals say were the real issues in the area and not rely on what we think we know,” said MPI senior manager Ben Dalton.

“At the workshops we will take these insights and help the community prioritise its needs, generate ideas and develop potential solutions.

“While the locals we talked to come from different backgrounds, everyone agrees something needs to be done.

“Solutions need a community-wide approach, while at the same time supporting people’s individual goals.

“The future of the community is intertwined and solutions need to balance the viewpoints of everyone.”

The workshops are part of a collaboration between MPI, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council and Wairoa District Council.

The first round of workshops has nearly wrapped up but several more, that are open to the public, are planned for December, with exact dates and locations not yet confirmed.

A SERIES of workshops is under way to tackle erosion and water quality issues in the Whakaki catchment and make it more productive and sustainable.

The Ministry for Primary Industries has identified severe erosion and water quality issues as affecting the long-term social, environmental and economic sustainability of the area.

MPI has partnered with the Whakaki community, including iwi, farmers and foresters, to identify a common vision for the future of the catchment and explore opportunities.

The aim is to stabilise erosion-prone farm land to minimise soil loss into the lake, improve water quality, trial alternative sustainable and economically viable land use options, and enhance the overall living standard of the community.

The workshops follow a series of MPI interviews with Whakaki residents to better understand the community’s future priorities, values and aspirations.

“It has been important to have spent the past couple of months mapping out and analysing what we heard locals say were the real issues in the area and not rely on what we think we know,” said MPI senior manager Ben Dalton.

“At the workshops we will take these insights and help the community prioritise its needs, generate ideas and develop potential solutions.

“While the locals we talked to come from different backgrounds, everyone agrees something needs to be done.

“Solutions need a community-wide approach, while at the same time supporting people’s individual goals.

“The future of the community is intertwined and solutions need to balance the viewpoints of everyone.”

The workshops are part of a collaboration between MPI, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council and Wairoa District Council.

The first round of workshops has nearly wrapped up but several more, that are open to the public, are planned for December, with exact dates and locations not yet confirmed.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.