Bumper crop of kiwi eggs at Maungataniwha

SAVING A SPECIES: Conservationists working in the Maungataniwha Native Forest, on the edge of Te Urewera National Park, recently lifted 32 eggs. The eggs will be incubated at Kiwi Encounter in Rotorua. File picture

A BUMPER harvest of kiwi eggs has marked kiwi conservation work in the Maungataniwha Native Forest.

Conservationists working for the Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust, inland from Wairoa on the southern edge
of Te Urewera National Park, have lifted 32 eggs for incubation.

They are reporting viability rates of 80 percent as opposed to the normal rate of around 65 percent.

Trust staffer Barry Crene said four of the trust’s monitored kiwi had abandoned their nests, possibly due to a wet spring.

He had received reports of similar behaviour from other kiwi conservation projects across the North Island.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust had planned to start lifting eggs from the second clutch before Christmas.

Kiwi eggs from the trust’s Maungataniwha Kiwi Project are incubated at Kiwi Encounter in Rotorua. Until now, all the resulting chicks have been reared in safety at the Cape Sanctuary near Napier. When they are large enough, they are released back into the forest from which the eggs were taken.

But growing numbers and pressure on the space available have forced the trust to find other safe “halfway houses” for the birds to grow.

It is working with the National Aquarium of New Zealand to expand the aquarium’s breeding facility so it can take an extra 30 birds a year, about half the number generated by the Maungataniwha Kiwi Project. The rest will continue to go to the Cape Sanctuary.

“The fact kiwi conservation initiatives are, between them, producing too many birds for existing rearing facilities to cope with, is testament to the effectiveness of the work being done by hundreds of dedicated people in the back blocks of this country, from Cape Reinga to Bluff,” said trust chairman Simon Hall.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust recently celebrated the return to Maungataniwha of the 200th young adult kiwi raised as part of its kiwi project, ensuring the viability of the population there for the next three decades.

Between inception in 2006 and the end of March last year it had harvested 453 eggs and released 237 young adults back into the wild.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust was established in 2006 to provide direction and funding for the restoration of threatened species of fauna and flora, and to restore the ngahere mauri (forest lifeforce) in native forests in the Central North Island.

It runs eight main regeneration and restoration projects, involving native New Zealand flora and fauna, on three properties in the central North Island. It also owns a property in Fiordland National Park in the South Island.

— Wairoa Star

A BUMPER harvest of kiwi eggs has marked kiwi conservation work in the Maungataniwha Native Forest.

Conservationists working for the Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust, inland from Wairoa on the southern edge
of Te Urewera National Park, have lifted 32 eggs for incubation.

They are reporting viability rates of 80 percent as opposed to the normal rate of around 65 percent.

Trust staffer Barry Crene said four of the trust’s monitored kiwi had abandoned their nests, possibly due to a wet spring.

He had received reports of similar behaviour from other kiwi conservation projects across the North Island.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust had planned to start lifting eggs from the second clutch before Christmas.

Kiwi eggs from the trust’s Maungataniwha Kiwi Project are incubated at Kiwi Encounter in Rotorua. Until now, all the resulting chicks have been reared in safety at the Cape Sanctuary near Napier. When they are large enough, they are released back into the forest from which the eggs were taken.

But growing numbers and pressure on the space available have forced the trust to find other safe “halfway houses” for the birds to grow.

It is working with the National Aquarium of New Zealand to expand the aquarium’s breeding facility so it can take an extra 30 birds a year, about half the number generated by the Maungataniwha Kiwi Project. The rest will continue to go to the Cape Sanctuary.

“The fact kiwi conservation initiatives are, between them, producing too many birds for existing rearing facilities to cope with, is testament to the effectiveness of the work being done by hundreds of dedicated people in the back blocks of this country, from Cape Reinga to Bluff,” said trust chairman Simon Hall.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust recently celebrated the return to Maungataniwha of the 200th young adult kiwi raised as part of its kiwi project, ensuring the viability of the population there for the next three decades.

Between inception in 2006 and the end of March last year it had harvested 453 eggs and released 237 young adults back into the wild.

The Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust was established in 2006 to provide direction and funding for the restoration of threatened species of fauna and flora, and to restore the ngahere mauri (forest lifeforce) in native forests in the Central North Island.

It runs eight main regeneration and restoration projects, involving native New Zealand flora and fauna, on three properties in the central North Island. It also owns a property in Fiordland National Park in the South Island.

— Wairoa Star

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