Landowners can work with GDC on pest plan

Privet berries, ready to do their worst. File picture

LANDOWNERS will be able to work on site plans with Gisborne District Council for a regional pest management operational plan adopted by the council’s environmental planning and regulations committee.

The committee has approved the operational plan, which is compulsory as part of the new regional pest management plan.

Site-led programmes are a new feature of the pest management plan, the committee was told.

The operational plan, which had to be provided after the council approved its new regional pest plan, would cover the next 15 months before it would have to be reviewed.

It included Tairawhiti Roads, council’s recreational and parks section, and DoC.

The operational plan identified site-led programmes where the council would be delivering services.

Resourcing had been provided in the long-term plan to allow the council to support landowners with any site-led programmes undertaken on their land. The council would be able to loan traps and other resources when assistance was sought.

With the introduction of landowner-directed possum control areas, the regional pest management plan also identified the criteria and process for establishing these control areas.

The total cost of the operational plan would be spread over the remainder of the 2017/18 and 2018/19 budgets.

That would see just over $1 million spent in each of the two years.

The new regional plan would require a new approach to how the council managed pest management in the region in past years, the committee was told.

The council’s plan now binds Crown agencies, including the local road authority, to adhere to pest management programmes identified in the plan.

As a result, the council established memoranda of understanding and agreements with Tairawhiti Roads, DoC and the council’s liveable communities hub.

This would enable a joint approach to prioritised land management of specific sites under their stewardship.

The operational plan included the agreed work programmes for Tairawhiti Roads, DoC and the council’s liveable communities hub.

Environmental and science services manager Lois Easton said the operational plan tried to give a complete picture for all the council’s biosecurity activities.

It was hoped it would be a one-stop-shop for people interested in what was going on in the area.

The first step for landowners wanting to be involved would be to develop a site management plan.

Possum control was focused on the buffer zone with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.

For landowners wanting intensive possum control, council staff would do the initial knockdown and the landowners would maintain it.

The criteria proposed was that there would be two or more adjacent landowners and also a minimum threshold of 10 hectares.

Tairawhiti Roads had gone from no weed control to total control in the management plan.

This would take a few years and the council was working with them on how to get that down to a managed level.

Priority would be given to purple flowering senecio and pampas, which blocked drains.

Parks

The council would focus on key reserves like Titirangi and the Lysnar Reserve, Makorori Headland and Gisborne beachfront.

It was expected a major improvement would be seen in parks and reserves.

Rehette Stoltz asked for an assurance that privet would be removed from all council reserves.

Ms Easton said unfortunately not. The budget did not include control on privet in council reserves.

Unfortunately it was a prolific seeder. But she said privet was one weed where there were real prospects for biological control.

LANDOWNERS will be able to work on site plans with Gisborne District Council for a regional pest management operational plan adopted by the council’s environmental planning and regulations committee.

The committee has approved the operational plan, which is compulsory as part of the new regional pest management plan.

Site-led programmes are a new feature of the pest management plan, the committee was told.

The operational plan, which had to be provided after the council approved its new regional pest plan, would cover the next 15 months before it would have to be reviewed.

It included Tairawhiti Roads, council’s recreational and parks section, and DoC.

The operational plan identified site-led programmes where the council would be delivering services.

Resourcing had been provided in the long-term plan to allow the council to support landowners with any site-led programmes undertaken on their land. The council would be able to loan traps and other resources when assistance was sought.

With the introduction of landowner-directed possum control areas, the regional pest management plan also identified the criteria and process for establishing these control areas.

The total cost of the operational plan would be spread over the remainder of the 2017/18 and 2018/19 budgets.

That would see just over $1 million spent in each of the two years.

The new regional plan would require a new approach to how the council managed pest management in the region in past years, the committee was told.

The council’s plan now binds Crown agencies, including the local road authority, to adhere to pest management programmes identified in the plan.

As a result, the council established memoranda of understanding and agreements with Tairawhiti Roads, DoC and the council’s liveable communities hub.

This would enable a joint approach to prioritised land management of specific sites under their stewardship.

The operational plan included the agreed work programmes for Tairawhiti Roads, DoC and the council’s liveable communities hub.

Environmental and science services manager Lois Easton said the operational plan tried to give a complete picture for all the council’s biosecurity activities.

It was hoped it would be a one-stop-shop for people interested in what was going on in the area.

The first step for landowners wanting to be involved would be to develop a site management plan.

Possum control was focused on the buffer zone with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.

For landowners wanting intensive possum control, council staff would do the initial knockdown and the landowners would maintain it.

The criteria proposed was that there would be two or more adjacent landowners and also a minimum threshold of 10 hectares.

Tairawhiti Roads had gone from no weed control to total control in the management plan.

This would take a few years and the council was working with them on how to get that down to a managed level.

Priority would be given to purple flowering senecio and pampas, which blocked drains.

Parks

The council would focus on key reserves like Titirangi and the Lysnar Reserve, Makorori Headland and Gisborne beachfront.

It was expected a major improvement would be seen in parks and reserves.

Rehette Stoltz asked for an assurance that privet would be removed from all council reserves.

Ms Easton said unfortunately not. The budget did not include control on privet in council reserves.

Unfortunately it was a prolific seeder. But she said privet was one weed where there were real prospects for biological control.

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