Predator control at Forest and Bird day

A UNIQUE opportunity to learn about predator trapping and all things creepy crawly will occur when Gisborne’s Forest and Bird hold their open day at Gray’s Bush this month.

Scheduled for Sunday, March 18 at 1:30pm, the open day will introduce and further familiarise people with the Gray’s Bush ecosystem and the voluntary pest and weed project.

This project has been running for more than seven years and is an important partnership between Forest and Bird and the Department of Conservation.

The Gisborne Forest and Bird Branch has recently bought modern self-setting kill-traps to replace most of their older manually-set traps.

“If you’re lucky there may be some still-warm dead rats, hedgehogs or other predators to see as well as long-dead taxidermied stoats and ferrets or maybe even a long absent weka.” says Forest and Bird Gisborne’s Grant Vincent.

There will also be the opportunity to view a selection of usually unseen invertebrates, with six legs and more.

A primary focus of this event will be to provide the community with a different perspective and greater understanding of the rare ecosystem.

Children and young people are welcome with adult supervision.

Light refreshments will also be available on the day.

There is also a Kiwi Conservation Club (junior Forest and Bird) outing planned for Gray’s Bush at a later date.

A UNIQUE opportunity to learn about predator trapping and all things creepy crawly will occur when Gisborne’s Forest and Bird hold their open day at Gray’s Bush this month.

Scheduled for Sunday, March 18 at 1:30pm, the open day will introduce and further familiarise people with the Gray’s Bush ecosystem and the voluntary pest and weed project.

This project has been running for more than seven years and is an important partnership between Forest and Bird and the Department of Conservation.

The Gisborne Forest and Bird Branch has recently bought modern self-setting kill-traps to replace most of their older manually-set traps.

“If you’re lucky there may be some still-warm dead rats, hedgehogs or other predators to see as well as long-dead taxidermied stoats and ferrets or maybe even a long absent weka.” says Forest and Bird Gisborne’s Grant Vincent.

There will also be the opportunity to view a selection of usually unseen invertebrates, with six legs and more.

A primary focus of this event will be to provide the community with a different perspective and greater understanding of the rare ecosystem.

Children and young people are welcome with adult supervision.

Light refreshments will also be available on the day.

There is also a Kiwi Conservation Club (junior Forest and Bird) outing planned for Gray’s Bush at a later date.

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