Conservation Board visit The Uawanui Project

SPECTACULAR VIEW: Looking out over Uawa (Tolaga Bay) from the ‘Hole in the Wall’ formation near Cooks Cove. Picture by Liam Clayton

A MEETING of the East Coast Hawke’s Bay Te Tairawhiti ki Te Matau-a-Maui Conservation Board (ECHBCB) earlier in March included a visit to the Cooks Cove Walkway as guests of The Uawanui Project.

ECHBCB members experienced the enthusiasm for this 100 year project which is focused on exploring opportunities for an integrated approach to sustainable land management and restoration across the Uawa River Catchment.

After a welcoming introduction from Victor Walker, Uawanui Trust chairman Peter Handford briefly outlined the restoration work on Titirangi Station, while Nori Parata extolled the changes in the school’s curriculum for students to focus on the place around them (The Uawanui) as a grounding for their future, wherever in the world they go.

“The Board appreciated a teacher sharing one student’s response when puffing heavily as he walked up the steep hills for planting and restoration work to state how it “still beats being in the classroom”, said ECHBCB chair Penny Shaw.

The linkage of conservation with education was demonstrated through the success of the cadetship programme.

During Saturday’s public forum session, Bridget and Mike Parker, together with Sandy Bull, outlined the Anaura Bay community’s concern with the possible impact should the Waipare Forest be logged.

The beach and marine landscape at Anaura is one of the only bays on the East Coast not covered with driftwood nor badly affected by river silting.

The community is concerned that logging of the pine forest in the steep watershed could devastate the Scenic Reserve’s biodiversity and wahi tapu (sacred) sites.

Concern was also expressed for the Department of Conservation (DoC) campground at Anuara Bay and effect of future logging on enjoyment of this unique location and natural biodiversity by visitors and locals alike.

The board appreciated hearing of the research done by the group and how the whole community had come together as one voice for this concern before discussing the Resource Management application process with the group. The board continues to draft the new 10 year conservation management strategy, aiming for public notification in early August.

Anyone interested in the cadetship programme can make contact with their local DoC office. Further information can be found at www.doc.govt.nz.

A MEETING of the East Coast Hawke’s Bay Te Tairawhiti ki Te Matau-a-Maui Conservation Board (ECHBCB) earlier in March included a visit to the Cooks Cove Walkway as guests of The Uawanui Project.

ECHBCB members experienced the enthusiasm for this 100 year project which is focused on exploring opportunities for an integrated approach to sustainable land management and restoration across the Uawa River Catchment.

After a welcoming introduction from Victor Walker, Uawanui Trust chairman Peter Handford briefly outlined the restoration work on Titirangi Station, while Nori Parata extolled the changes in the school’s curriculum for students to focus on the place around them (The Uawanui) as a grounding for their future, wherever in the world they go.

“The Board appreciated a teacher sharing one student’s response when puffing heavily as he walked up the steep hills for planting and restoration work to state how it “still beats being in the classroom”, said ECHBCB chair Penny Shaw.

The linkage of conservation with education was demonstrated through the success of the cadetship programme.

During Saturday’s public forum session, Bridget and Mike Parker, together with Sandy Bull, outlined the Anaura Bay community’s concern with the possible impact should the Waipare Forest be logged.

The beach and marine landscape at Anaura is one of the only bays on the East Coast not covered with driftwood nor badly affected by river silting.

The community is concerned that logging of the pine forest in the steep watershed could devastate the Scenic Reserve’s biodiversity and wahi tapu (sacred) sites.

Concern was also expressed for the Department of Conservation (DoC) campground at Anuara Bay and effect of future logging on enjoyment of this unique location and natural biodiversity by visitors and locals alike.

The board appreciated hearing of the research done by the group and how the whole community had come together as one voice for this concern before discussing the Resource Management application process with the group. The board continues to draft the new 10 year conservation management strategy, aiming for public notification in early August.

Anyone interested in the cadetship programme can make contact with their local DoC office. Further information can be found at www.doc.govt.nz.

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