New plants at Waikanae stream to boost ecology

500 plants added to stream

500 plants added to stream

STREAM SUPPORT: Over 30 eco-volunteers turned out over the weekend to add 500 plants to the banks of the Waikanae stream. The root systems of the plants reduce the risk of erosion and support drainage. Picture supplied

A PLANTING and water testing event held at Waikanae stream over the weekend attracted more than 30 eco-volunteers and added around 500 plants to the ongoing improvements of the waterway.

Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust organised the event as part of an annual programme of taiao (environment) activities and initiatives they are undertaking this year to achieve key objectives.

Project lead, Soraya Pohatu, said they were pleased with the numbers of volunteers who turned out on Saturday for the planting.

“It was a fantastic turnout of people both young and old and everyone had something to share and gain from the day.”

The trust took the opportunity to educate and share skills and information on the relevance of rivers and streams and how riparian planting support these systems and our overall environment.

“The root systems of the plants reduce the risk of erosion and support drainage,” said Ms Pohatu.

“Plants help trap sediment and therefore help remove pollutants from the waterways.

“Benefits of this type of planting include the creation of shelter habitat for nesting birds and a nursery for other wildlife.”

The trust has a greenhouse at their Manutuke base, where hundreds of eco-sourced plants are used for various planting programs.

While planting the riparian vegetation, eco-volunteers were told about the relevance of the leaf litter produced.

“This leaf litter creates energy and adds to the essential ‘food webs’ for these areas which are part of a much bigger food chain,” said Ms Pohatu.

“The trust is committed to a future where the health and wellbeing of our environment is recognised as a critical part of our wellbeing today and for the next generation.

“These days do not happen without support and the Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust wish to acknowledge the Gisborne District Council, Department of Conservation and the other community organisations that contributed to our taiao programme,” said Ms Pohatu.

The trust also assisted with the planting of the Tamarau wetlands over the previous month.

On August 18, there will be a bio-blitz held at Te Wherowhero lagoon.

For further information about the bio-blitz and future events, please contact Soraya Pohatu via email on SPohatu@eit.ac.nz.

A PLANTING and water testing event held at Waikanae stream over the weekend attracted more than 30 eco-volunteers and added around 500 plants to the ongoing improvements of the waterway.

Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust organised the event as part of an annual programme of taiao (environment) activities and initiatives they are undertaking this year to achieve key objectives.

Project lead, Soraya Pohatu, said they were pleased with the numbers of volunteers who turned out on Saturday for the planting.

“It was a fantastic turnout of people both young and old and everyone had something to share and gain from the day.”

The trust took the opportunity to educate and share skills and information on the relevance of rivers and streams and how riparian planting support these systems and our overall environment.

“The root systems of the plants reduce the risk of erosion and support drainage,” said Ms Pohatu.

“Plants help trap sediment and therefore help remove pollutants from the waterways.

“Benefits of this type of planting include the creation of shelter habitat for nesting birds and a nursery for other wildlife.”

The trust has a greenhouse at their Manutuke base, where hundreds of eco-sourced plants are used for various planting programs.

While planting the riparian vegetation, eco-volunteers were told about the relevance of the leaf litter produced.

“This leaf litter creates energy and adds to the essential ‘food webs’ for these areas which are part of a much bigger food chain,” said Ms Pohatu.

“The trust is committed to a future where the health and wellbeing of our environment is recognised as a critical part of our wellbeing today and for the next generation.

“These days do not happen without support and the Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust wish to acknowledge the Gisborne District Council, Department of Conservation and the other community organisations that contributed to our taiao programme,” said Ms Pohatu.

The trust also assisted with the planting of the Tamarau wetlands over the previous month.

On August 18, there will be a bio-blitz held at Te Wherowhero lagoon.

For further information about the bio-blitz and future events, please contact Soraya Pohatu via email on SPohatu@eit.ac.nz.

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