Bee-ing aware of bees

BUZZY BEE MONTH: September is the time for celebrating bees, a vital part of New Zealand’s economy and ecosystem. Picture supplied
Bee aware month logo
Bee Awareness

APICULTURE New Zealand (ApiNZ) is celebrating the importance of bees this September with a Bee-Aware Month campaign.

Protecting the health of our bee population is a hot topic among beekeepers and scientists.

This year, schools, councils, community groups, and bee enthusiasts all over the country are involved in Bee Aware Month activities and celebrations.

Poverty Bay Apiculture president Barry Foster said he will be spending the day at Rere Primary School on Wednesday, September 26.

“We plan on teaching the children a little bit about bees and we will show them a real hive of bees.

“It will be contained in a glass-sided box so they can safely see what the bees do.

Then we’ll treat the kids to some goodies made of honey.

“Educating the younger generations is the key to protecting New Zealand’s bees, Mr Foster said.

“Bees have a huge impact on New Zealand’s economy and ecosystem by providing pollination services in our environment and making honey.

“ApiNZ is using Bee Aware Month as a channel to educate communities about how they can protect bees in their own backyards,” he said.

The ApiNZ website says honey bees in New Zealand face threats from diseases and pests within the country and potentially from those overseas.

Anyone can help bees by planting trees and flowers with the most effective being wildflowers.

They are naturally organic, are not susceptible to bugs or diseases, can help control garden pests, and they attract bees and beneficial insects to the garden.

Bees will forage on wildflowers and other bee-friendly plants for nectar and pollen, which provide carbohydrates and protein for growth and energy. Well-nourished bees are more capable of fending off disease and parasites.

Gisborne’s Pohutakawa Kids (PK) Home based childcare and education programme will be planting a bee-friendly garden with the wild flower seed pack from ApiNZ.

PK OSCAR coordinator Stacey Hocking said she ordered wildflowers off the ApiNZ website for the kids to plant seed bombs for the childcare centre’s garden.

“I think it is important kids learn about where their food comes from and how important bees are for our food sources,” she said.

The Bee Aware Facebook page is posting quizzes on their page and participants go into the draw to win one of two Comvita gift packs.

For more information and to keep up to date and informed visit the Bee Aware Month Facebook page or their website. https://apinz.org.nz/bee-aware-month/

— Plant bee-friendly gardens in both urban and rural spaces.

— Do not spray your garden with pesticides.

If you do choose to use spray:

— Spray early in the morning or at sunset when bees are not present and plants are not in flower.

— Provide fresh water in a bowl and add pebbles or twigs in the water for bees to rest on while they drink.

APICULTURE New Zealand (ApiNZ) is celebrating the importance of bees this September with a Bee-Aware Month campaign.

Protecting the health of our bee population is a hot topic among beekeepers and scientists.

This year, schools, councils, community groups, and bee enthusiasts all over the country are involved in Bee Aware Month activities and celebrations.

Poverty Bay Apiculture president Barry Foster said he will be spending the day at Rere Primary School on Wednesday, September 26.

“We plan on teaching the children a little bit about bees and we will show them a real hive of bees.

“It will be contained in a glass-sided box so they can safely see what the bees do.

Then we’ll treat the kids to some goodies made of honey.

“Educating the younger generations is the key to protecting New Zealand’s bees, Mr Foster said.

“Bees have a huge impact on New Zealand’s economy and ecosystem by providing pollination services in our environment and making honey.

“ApiNZ is using Bee Aware Month as a channel to educate communities about how they can protect bees in their own backyards,” he said.

The ApiNZ website says honey bees in New Zealand face threats from diseases and pests within the country and potentially from those overseas.

Anyone can help bees by planting trees and flowers with the most effective being wildflowers.

They are naturally organic, are not susceptible to bugs or diseases, can help control garden pests, and they attract bees and beneficial insects to the garden.

Bees will forage on wildflowers and other bee-friendly plants for nectar and pollen, which provide carbohydrates and protein for growth and energy. Well-nourished bees are more capable of fending off disease and parasites.

Gisborne’s Pohutakawa Kids (PK) Home based childcare and education programme will be planting a bee-friendly garden with the wild flower seed pack from ApiNZ.

PK OSCAR coordinator Stacey Hocking said she ordered wildflowers off the ApiNZ website for the kids to plant seed bombs for the childcare centre’s garden.

“I think it is important kids learn about where their food comes from and how important bees are for our food sources,” she said.

The Bee Aware Facebook page is posting quizzes on their page and participants go into the draw to win one of two Comvita gift packs.

For more information and to keep up to date and informed visit the Bee Aware Month Facebook page or their website. https://apinz.org.nz/bee-aware-month/

— Plant bee-friendly gardens in both urban and rural spaces.

— Do not spray your garden with pesticides.

If you do choose to use spray:

— Spray early in the morning or at sunset when bees are not present and plants are not in flower.

— Provide fresh water in a bowl and add pebbles or twigs in the water for bees to rest on while they drink.

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