Saving the planet ‘Whangara style’

Students show parents impact of plastic on ranginui, papatuanuku and their tamariki

Students show parents impact of plastic on ranginui, papatuanuku and their tamariki

POSITIVE IMPACT: Whangara School children looked at the effects pollution have on the environment through the eyes of the Atua (gods). In front is Zyone Leach, back from left are Ruby Green, Toby Williamson, Bella Lincoln, Tessa Newman, Posey Willock, Zara Kirkpatrick, Bailey-Jane Maaka and Earl Downs Campbell who all created environmentally friendly reusable bags. By Rebecca Grunwell
IF I CAN DO IT, YOU CAN DO IT: Rosa Malone aged 10 leads the way by integrating modern science with tradition, by creating biodegradeable plastic and combining it with harakeke (flax) to make a sealed bag. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell

WHANGARA School has been looking at the world through the eyes of the atua (gods) and the effects pollution has on them.

They created an exhibit for a whanau evening to share what they had learned about all the ways the environment is being affected with a focus on how plastic affects the ranginui (sky), paptuanuku (earth) and their tamariki (children).

Whangara School teacher Amy Wright said they had a whanau impact sharing evening last week.

“The purpose of the evening was to make a positive impact by getting the kids to share what they have learnt with our whanau and community to inspire them to make a change.

“They integrated science and technology and created an exhibition of science experiments, models and multimedia art pieces,” she said.

There were models of papatuanuku, tangaroa (sea), tawhirimatea (weather) and ruaumoko (earthquakes) that told a story of how people are filling Papatuanuku with rubbish and although she still looks beautiful on the outside she is dying on the inside and the models cry through a gravity fed fountain.

The anger of the tamariki was represented by a wave tank (tangaroa) and a shake table, (ruaumoko) for papatuanuk’s pregnant puku (belly), and a fan that blew the rubbish everywhere (tawhirimatea).

Interactive information boards explained the effects of air pollution on ranginui (ozone layer) and the issue of rising sea levels, the effects landfills have on tanemahuta (plant growth) and by finding out what is truly biodegradeable.

They studied the effect oil spills and what you can use to clean up a small spill from a whanau boat.

They learned how to create a limigrip to inspire people to attend beach clean ups because they don’t have to touch the rubbish and how to make shampoo bars and laundry flakes to reduce bought packaging.

Ten-year-old Rosa Malone went over and beyond by creating biodegradeable plastic and combining it with harakeke (flax) to make a sealed bag.

“I turned old school into new school by using harakeke (flax) and biodegradeable plastic to make bags.

“So you can re-use it or you can chuck it in the compost when it is too broken.

“I’m trying to encourage others to use these bags instead of plastic ones because my experiment will make them think they can do it too,” said Rosa.

Ms Wright said the teina (young) children created environmentally friendly reusable bags that can be used for the bulk bins and produce at the supermarket.

“They measured and created the patterns and then they ran a production line with departments for sewing, plaiting drawstrings, making tags, threading drawstrings and quality control.

“After the bags were sewed the children screen printed them with a ‘Whangara styles’ logo that they designed themselves.

“They sold their bags to cover the costs of making them and their bags sold out in 10 minutes. The kids and their whanau were very proud of their mahi (work) with one girl saying ‘we definitely made an impact’,” she said.

WHANGARA School has been looking at the world through the eyes of the atua (gods) and the effects pollution has on them.

They created an exhibit for a whanau evening to share what they had learned about all the ways the environment is being affected with a focus on how plastic affects the ranginui (sky), paptuanuku (earth) and their tamariki (children).

Whangara School teacher Amy Wright said they had a whanau impact sharing evening last week.

“The purpose of the evening was to make a positive impact by getting the kids to share what they have learnt with our whanau and community to inspire them to make a change.

“They integrated science and technology and created an exhibition of science experiments, models and multimedia art pieces,” she said.

There were models of papatuanuku, tangaroa (sea), tawhirimatea (weather) and ruaumoko (earthquakes) that told a story of how people are filling Papatuanuku with rubbish and although she still looks beautiful on the outside she is dying on the inside and the models cry through a gravity fed fountain.

The anger of the tamariki was represented by a wave tank (tangaroa) and a shake table, (ruaumoko) for papatuanuk’s pregnant puku (belly), and a fan that blew the rubbish everywhere (tawhirimatea).

Interactive information boards explained the effects of air pollution on ranginui (ozone layer) and the issue of rising sea levels, the effects landfills have on tanemahuta (plant growth) and by finding out what is truly biodegradeable.

They studied the effect oil spills and what you can use to clean up a small spill from a whanau boat.

They learned how to create a limigrip to inspire people to attend beach clean ups because they don’t have to touch the rubbish and how to make shampoo bars and laundry flakes to reduce bought packaging.

Ten-year-old Rosa Malone went over and beyond by creating biodegradeable plastic and combining it with harakeke (flax) to make a sealed bag.

“I turned old school into new school by using harakeke (flax) and biodegradeable plastic to make bags.

“So you can re-use it or you can chuck it in the compost when it is too broken.

“I’m trying to encourage others to use these bags instead of plastic ones because my experiment will make them think they can do it too,” said Rosa.

Ms Wright said the teina (young) children created environmentally friendly reusable bags that can be used for the bulk bins and produce at the supermarket.

“They measured and created the patterns and then they ran a production line with departments for sewing, plaiting drawstrings, making tags, threading drawstrings and quality control.

“After the bags were sewed the children screen printed them with a ‘Whangara styles’ logo that they designed themselves.

“They sold their bags to cover the costs of making them and their bags sold out in 10 minutes. The kids and their whanau were very proud of their mahi (work) with one girl saying ‘we definitely made an impact’,” she said.

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