Getting schooled on energy

TEST DRIVE: Students from Matawai School hopped in an electric car at an Energy Workshop held in Gisborne last week. They got the chance to lift the bonnet and discover the differences — there is no place to put oil in the car because it is not needed, and there is no exhaust either. Because the electric-powered Nissan emits no pollution, and has low level noise, they are touted as the way of the future and a great way to reduce noise and fume pollutions in larger cities. They can be charged in about 40 minutes for a cost of about $8 at the fast charging stations around Gisborne. Or, plug it in at home and it would take about seven hours to charge at a cost of around $5. In the driver’s seat is Riley Knight with his passenger Duncan Carmichael. In the back (from left) are Lyem Barbarich, Violet Notman-Downs, Hayley De La Haye and Tom McLachlan. Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
SOLAR LIFE: Kauri Forno ensures her carbon footprint on this planet is as light as possible. Her motorhome has solar power energy to run the lights, the television, her music and hot water. The only fossil fuels she uses are diesel to run the motorhome and gas for the fridge. Ms Forno also has her two dogs with her wherever she goes and the nomadic lifestyle means she can enjoy different parts of nature whenever she wants.
HANDS ON INTERACTIVE FUN: Cole Alexander test drove an electric scooter at the Electric Village on Gladstone Road last week. He managed to pick it up quickly and navigate the turns with ease.

Solar powered motorhomes, electric cars, bikes and scooters were all available at an Energy Workshop last week to give primary school students the chance to see them first hand. The workshop was divided into 10-minute segments to give small groups of students the chance to ask questions and try out the scooters, and hop in the car.

The purpose was to get students familiar, confident and inspired by the alternative energy being used already in Gisborne.

Solar powered motorhomes, electric cars, bikes and scooters were all available at an Energy Workshop last week to give primary school students the chance to see them first hand. The workshop was divided into 10-minute segments to give small groups of students the chance to ask questions and try out the scooters, and hop in the car.

The purpose was to get students familiar, confident and inspired by the alternative energy being used already in Gisborne.

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