Field day at Te Koawa Station

Eucalypts the focus.

Eucalypts the focus.

DURABLE POSTS: Gisborne eucalypt growers have produced timber that has been part of successful trials in Marlborough on hardwood posts used in vineyards. Over 10 years they ahve stood up very well. File picture
Gisborne could be central to a new $2 billion eucalypt hardwood industry. File picture

THE Farm Forestry Association will stage a field day at Te Koawa Station on the Whakarau Road next weekend to view eucalypt trees planted on the station as part of a trial five years ago.

Bob Wishart and Meg Gaddum planted the trees in 2010 and 2011 as part of a New Zealand dryland forests initiative (NZDFI).

“The project is a commercially-oriented research and development one to develop genetically improved planting stock and management systems for ground-durable eucalypt species suited to New Zealand’s dryland regions including Gisborne,” a farm forestry spokesman said.

“This includes highly innovative research into heartwood development and timber durability.

“The NZDFI is working with farm foresters to develop best-practice pruning and thinning regimes so that growers can produce a range of products including posts and poles.”

He said the trial plantings on Te Koawa were part of an extensive trial series established by NZDFI throughout the East Coast to evaluate the potential adaptability, productivity and management of durable eucalypts in New Zealand drylands.

“The establishment of these trials was supported by the Ministry of Primary Industries Sustainable Farming Fund.”

The Field Day is on February 20 from 1.30 - 4.30pm.

It starts at the property’s woolshed with a presentation by Paul Millen, NZDFI project manager. He will provide an update on the NZDFI research programme followed by a question and answer session and then participants will walk to the eucalypt trial site for lunch, about a 2km round trip.

Bring your own refreshments, in a knapsack, and wear boots suitable for steep terrain. A raincoat is suggested if the weather is wet.

RSVP to Rodney and Sarah Faulkner, sandrfaulkner@orcon.net.nz

THE Farm Forestry Association will stage a field day at Te Koawa Station on the Whakarau Road next weekend to view eucalypt trees planted on the station as part of a trial five years ago.

Bob Wishart and Meg Gaddum planted the trees in 2010 and 2011 as part of a New Zealand dryland forests initiative (NZDFI).

“The project is a commercially-oriented research and development one to develop genetically improved planting stock and management systems for ground-durable eucalypt species suited to New Zealand’s dryland regions including Gisborne,” a farm forestry spokesman said.

“This includes highly innovative research into heartwood development and timber durability.

“The NZDFI is working with farm foresters to develop best-practice pruning and thinning regimes so that growers can produce a range of products including posts and poles.”

He said the trial plantings on Te Koawa were part of an extensive trial series established by NZDFI throughout the East Coast to evaluate the potential adaptability, productivity and management of durable eucalypts in New Zealand drylands.

“The establishment of these trials was supported by the Ministry of Primary Industries Sustainable Farming Fund.”

The Field Day is on February 20 from 1.30 - 4.30pm.

It starts at the property’s woolshed with a presentation by Paul Millen, NZDFI project manager. He will provide an update on the NZDFI research programme followed by a question and answer session and then participants will walk to the eucalypt trial site for lunch, about a 2km round trip.

Bring your own refreshments, in a knapsack, and wear boots suitable for steep terrain. A raincoat is suggested if the weather is wet.

RSVP to Rodney and Sarah Faulkner, sandrfaulkner@orcon.net.nz

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