Whangara hosts McDonalds

Global meat buying team from fast food chain drops in.

Global meat buying team from fast food chain drops in.

FARM PRACTICE: Whangara Farms general manager Richard Scholefield(second from left) laid out the farming practices that go into the beef the farms produce that McDonalds buy for their burgers worldwide. Picture supplied
MACCAS VISITORS: Whangara Farms hosted a the international beef buying team from McDonalds on-farm on Sunday afternoon with presentations on their beef sustainability model(pictured) and a farm tour. (Left to right) farms general manager Richard Scholefield and his wife Karen Scholefield, Lachie Grant - Land Vision, Susie Craig (Sydney) - Manager Sustainability ANZ McDonalds, Frank Carbone from Agrifood Global - McDonalds, Rickette Collins (Illinois, USA) - senior director - Beef/Pork/Fish - McDonalds, Ignacio Blanco-Traba (Madrid, Spain) - senior director - Sustainable Sourcing - McDonalds, Malcolm Gourlie - Eastern North Island Livestock manager Silver fern Farms, Ingrid Collins chairwoman of Whangara Farms, James Anderson - farm consultant, and Chris Torrie, BDO. Pictures supplied

WHANGARA Farms hosted their second set of international visitors in a week on Sunday when they showed the global meat buying team from fast food chain McDonalds around the property.

This followed the visit last week by the Kristensen family from Danish footwear company Glerups.

Whangara Farms chairwoman Ingrid Collins, general manager Richard Scholefield and Chris Torrie from BDO showed the group around the property.

Mrs Collins outlined the history of the Whangara land from the arrival of Maori in New Zealand in the 10th century, and Mr Scholefield detailed the farming practices involved in their beef production.

“McDonald’s has partnered with Beef and Lamb New Zealand and Silver Fern Farms (SFF) to initiate a Sustainable Beef integration project which is focused on encouraging sustainable production practices,” SFF spokesman Greg McSkimming said.

The programme includes elements of business planning, animal health and welfare, workplace health and safety, farm profitability, and environmental impacts on land, soil and water resources.

“McDonalds are seeking to encourage sustainable production practices and have initiated this worldwide project to engage producers, processors, and industry good providers to provide a supply chain approach to beef production.”

Mr McSkimming, who leads the project for SFF, said the project parties share a commitment to increasing awareness of supply chain practices and increasing intra-supply chain communication.

“The first phase of the project was to prove on-farm that a model could be created to capture the key components and measures required to validate a sustainable approach to beef farming.

“That aim has proved successful on Whangara Farms with a model developed that provides the end customer with ethical beef farmed in the best possible way.” The model is currently being tested on other farms in the region.

Richard Scholefield said they made several presentations to the visitors on Sunday around the sustainability model and toured the farms. The farms send 2500 bulls for processing each year. “Most, if not all, of that beef goes to McDonalds.”

The visitors were also taken to the Whangara marae. “I told them the story of our ancestor Paikea and how he arrived at Whangara,” Mrs Collins said.

“Our visitors were impressed with the story and the longevity of the ownership of the Whangara Farms’ land.

“They have toured the world visiting McDonalds suppliers and they told us Whangara was the most impressive.”

The visitors went on to see another farm in Hawke’s Bay and then the McDonalds team met with Beef and Lamb NZ and Silver Fern Farms in Wellington.

WHANGARA Farms hosted their second set of international visitors in a week on Sunday when they showed the global meat buying team from fast food chain McDonalds around the property.

This followed the visit last week by the Kristensen family from Danish footwear company Glerups.

Whangara Farms chairwoman Ingrid Collins, general manager Richard Scholefield and Chris Torrie from BDO showed the group around the property.

Mrs Collins outlined the history of the Whangara land from the arrival of Maori in New Zealand in the 10th century, and Mr Scholefield detailed the farming practices involved in their beef production.

“McDonald’s has partnered with Beef and Lamb New Zealand and Silver Fern Farms (SFF) to initiate a Sustainable Beef integration project which is focused on encouraging sustainable production practices,” SFF spokesman Greg McSkimming said.

The programme includes elements of business planning, animal health and welfare, workplace health and safety, farm profitability, and environmental impacts on land, soil and water resources.

“McDonalds are seeking to encourage sustainable production practices and have initiated this worldwide project to engage producers, processors, and industry good providers to provide a supply chain approach to beef production.”

Mr McSkimming, who leads the project for SFF, said the project parties share a commitment to increasing awareness of supply chain practices and increasing intra-supply chain communication.

“The first phase of the project was to prove on-farm that a model could be created to capture the key components and measures required to validate a sustainable approach to beef farming.

“That aim has proved successful on Whangara Farms with a model developed that provides the end customer with ethical beef farmed in the best possible way.” The model is currently being tested on other farms in the region.

Richard Scholefield said they made several presentations to the visitors on Sunday around the sustainability model and toured the farms. The farms send 2500 bulls for processing each year. “Most, if not all, of that beef goes to McDonalds.”

The visitors were also taken to the Whangara marae. “I told them the story of our ancestor Paikea and how he arrived at Whangara,” Mrs Collins said.

“Our visitors were impressed with the story and the longevity of the ownership of the Whangara Farms’ land.

“They have toured the world visiting McDonalds suppliers and they told us Whangara was the most impressive.”

The visitors went on to see another farm in Hawke’s Bay and then the McDonalds team met with Beef and Lamb NZ and Silver Fern Farms in Wellington.

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