Wet winter delays planting

WELCOME WEATHER: Croppers have welcomed a break from persistent rain as they prepare soil for planting. Cedenco’s pea planting operation is running a couple of weeks behind because of the wet weather. This tractor is pictured preparing soil in a paddock at Bushmere yesterday. Picture by Liam Clayton

THE end of the winter and a break from persistent wet weather cannot come soon enough for growers trying to plant crops.

Wet conditions have caused delays in planting some crops.

Cedenco started to put its annual pea crop in the ground last week, a couple of weeks later than usual.

“We are definitely behind with our pea planting but it is not a show-stopper,” said Cedenco agronomy manager David Oudes.

“Pea planting has been a little bit later than we would ideally like.’

The crop normally starts to go in the ground in July.

“It has been so wet, which has been very trying,” Mr Oudes said.

“Up until about 10 days ago it had been too difficult to get machinery in to prepare paddocks.

“But the warmer and finer weather in the past week has been a welcome break after a really wet couple of months.

“If we can get a good run now we should still get the volume of peas planted that we require, providing the weather behaves itself and we get a break from persistent rain.”

Cedenco’s onion crop has gone in and Mr Oudes said that crop was a bit later than usual too.

“But the onions are in, that’s the main thing.

“Our tomatoes are being seeded. We are into our fourth week of that work and that’s not affected by the weather because it all happens under cover.”

LeaderBrand general manager Richard Burke said the wet winter had affected their operations.

“The first thing we’ve got to remember is that it’s August and still winter. It certainly has been a very trying time for cropping since autumn.

“The persistent wet weather has affected a lot of what we have done through the winter.”

Mr Burke said some of that weather impact would continue into spring and even early summer with some crops.

“Particularly our salad crops. Any crops that are susceptible to rot-type diseases caused by wet weather.

“It does affect supply and that is why we have this regional approach now, and why we don't rely on Gisborne for 100 percent of our supply.”

Mr Burke said the warmth level with the weather was not an issue.

“It is warm enough. It’s just got to stop raining so much. Dryer weather, that’s all we're looking for.”

The sweetcorn planting season is about a month away, so too the planting of maize. Mid to late September has been the usual time frame for that work.

Growers of those crops are OK at this stage.

THE end of the winter and a break from persistent wet weather cannot come soon enough for growers trying to plant crops.

Wet conditions have caused delays in planting some crops.

Cedenco started to put its annual pea crop in the ground last week, a couple of weeks later than usual.

“We are definitely behind with our pea planting but it is not a show-stopper,” said Cedenco agronomy manager David Oudes.

“Pea planting has been a little bit later than we would ideally like.’

The crop normally starts to go in the ground in July.

“It has been so wet, which has been very trying,” Mr Oudes said.

“Up until about 10 days ago it had been too difficult to get machinery in to prepare paddocks.

“But the warmer and finer weather in the past week has been a welcome break after a really wet couple of months.

“If we can get a good run now we should still get the volume of peas planted that we require, providing the weather behaves itself and we get a break from persistent rain.”

Cedenco’s onion crop has gone in and Mr Oudes said that crop was a bit later than usual too.

“But the onions are in, that’s the main thing.

“Our tomatoes are being seeded. We are into our fourth week of that work and that’s not affected by the weather because it all happens under cover.”

LeaderBrand general manager Richard Burke said the wet winter had affected their operations.

“The first thing we’ve got to remember is that it’s August and still winter. It certainly has been a very trying time for cropping since autumn.

“The persistent wet weather has affected a lot of what we have done through the winter.”

Mr Burke said some of that weather impact would continue into spring and even early summer with some crops.

“Particularly our salad crops. Any crops that are susceptible to rot-type diseases caused by wet weather.

“It does affect supply and that is why we have this regional approach now, and why we don't rely on Gisborne for 100 percent of our supply.”

Mr Burke said the warmth level with the weather was not an issue.

“It is warm enough. It’s just got to stop raining so much. Dryer weather, that’s all we're looking for.”

The sweetcorn planting season is about a month away, so too the planting of maize. Mid to late September has been the usual time frame for that work.

Growers of those crops are OK at this stage.

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