Pioneer award to Gisborne grower

Sir JK and friends: Sir John Kirwan’s speech went down a treat at the Pioneer function where he caught up with some young fans. From left to right: Max Elsmore, William Rouse, Sir John, Jack Lepper and Lukas Fry. Pictures supplied and from our files
NATIONAL WINNER: David Plowman of Bostock NZ Ltd accepted the National Cup and the top regional award at the Pioneer Seeds Industry Get Together last Thursday afternoon at the Bushmere Arms. Mr Plowman is the company’s grain manager.
‘BEST IN GISBORNE’: Gisborne grower Brian Amor received the runnersup up award in the highest-yield category nationally. Mr Amor has won the overall yield Cup four times previously, and has featured every year in the awards since they were introduced.

BOSTOCK NZ Ltd from Hastings took out the Pioneer Brand Seeds Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay regional cup and the national cup for grain maize production at the company’s Industry Get Together in Gisborne last week.

Gisborne grower Brian Amor featured again this year in the grain yield competition.

The competition recognises grain growers achieving the highest yields with Pioneer® brand maize hybrids on their on-farm trials.

The Bostocks, big cropping and organic apple orchardists based in Hawke’s Bay, were the overwhelming winner in all three regional categories, as well as being the highest yielding regional winner in the country.

They won the regional awards for early maturity with P9241 yielding 16.35 tonnes per hectare, the mid-maturity P0640 yielding 19.35/ton/ha and full maturity yielding 18.7/ton/ha.

Their P0640 was the highest yielding result among Pioneer Seeds growers in the country and they picked up the National Cup.

“They planted 600ha of maize last season and the vertically-integrated model means they grow, harvest, dry and market their own maize,” said area manager Simon Begley.

“Their state-of-the-art processing plant and high-tech storage facilities ensures the maize is high quality with a consistent supply year-round.”

The runner up for the full maturity was Brian Amor of Gisborne with 18.34 tonnes per hectare.

“Runnersup is not as good as winning but it was a really hard year.

“I’m the best in Gisborne and that feels good, but those guys in Hawke’s Bay got a bit more rain than we did last season.”

Mr Amor has won the overall yield Cup four times previously, and has featured every year to some degree in the awards since they were introduced.

“We hope now that the weather will shine on us this coming season.”

Mr Amor plans at this stage to get his crop in the ground for this season sometime between October 1 and the A&P Spring Show.

Guest speaker at Thursday’s event Sir John Kirwan, former All Black and mental health campaigner, gave a thoroughly entertaining address that was well-received by the audience.

“We approached Sir John to be our guest speaker to show our support for the hardships encountered in the rural community,” Mr Begley said.

“Sir John spoke about his own journey through depression, and urged the audience to speak openly about the illness, and to seek help without shame.”

JK said: “In a country that has the highest suicide rate in the developed world, the rural sector is over-represented due to a variety of factors including isolation, stoicism and market volatility.”

Other speakers included Pioneer forage and farm systems specialist Ian Williams, who spoke about considering the environment and looking at the way we farm.

He discussed the possibility of dedicated cropping paddocks as one way to reduce nitrogen saturation.

Growers attended from Waipawa in Hawke’s Bay to Tolaga Bay.

The Gisborne presentation was one of six held around the country.

BOSTOCK NZ Ltd from Hastings took out the Pioneer Brand Seeds Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay regional cup and the national cup for grain maize production at the company’s Industry Get Together in Gisborne last week.

Gisborne grower Brian Amor featured again this year in the grain yield competition.

The competition recognises grain growers achieving the highest yields with Pioneer® brand maize hybrids on their on-farm trials.

The Bostocks, big cropping and organic apple orchardists based in Hawke’s Bay, were the overwhelming winner in all three regional categories, as well as being the highest yielding regional winner in the country.

They won the regional awards for early maturity with P9241 yielding 16.35 tonnes per hectare, the mid-maturity P0640 yielding 19.35/ton/ha and full maturity yielding 18.7/ton/ha.

Their P0640 was the highest yielding result among Pioneer Seeds growers in the country and they picked up the National Cup.

“They planted 600ha of maize last season and the vertically-integrated model means they grow, harvest, dry and market their own maize,” said area manager Simon Begley.

“Their state-of-the-art processing plant and high-tech storage facilities ensures the maize is high quality with a consistent supply year-round.”

The runner up for the full maturity was Brian Amor of Gisborne with 18.34 tonnes per hectare.

“Runnersup is not as good as winning but it was a really hard year.

“I’m the best in Gisborne and that feels good, but those guys in Hawke’s Bay got a bit more rain than we did last season.”

Mr Amor has won the overall yield Cup four times previously, and has featured every year to some degree in the awards since they were introduced.

“We hope now that the weather will shine on us this coming season.”

Mr Amor plans at this stage to get his crop in the ground for this season sometime between October 1 and the A&P Spring Show.

Guest speaker at Thursday’s event Sir John Kirwan, former All Black and mental health campaigner, gave a thoroughly entertaining address that was well-received by the audience.

“We approached Sir John to be our guest speaker to show our support for the hardships encountered in the rural community,” Mr Begley said.

“Sir John spoke about his own journey through depression, and urged the audience to speak openly about the illness, and to seek help without shame.”

JK said: “In a country that has the highest suicide rate in the developed world, the rural sector is over-represented due to a variety of factors including isolation, stoicism and market volatility.”

Other speakers included Pioneer forage and farm systems specialist Ian Williams, who spoke about considering the environment and looking at the way we farm.

He discussed the possibility of dedicated cropping paddocks as one way to reduce nitrogen saturation.

Growers attended from Waipawa in Hawke’s Bay to Tolaga Bay.

The Gisborne presentation was one of six held around the country.

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