Future of farming event planned

A burger made from cultured beef, which has been developed by Professor Mark Post of Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Cultured Beef could help solve the coming food crisis and combat climate change. Commercial production of cultured beef could begin within 10 to 20 years. David Parry/PA

A RECENT global study on the future of meat found traditional sheep and beef farmers in the Gisborne region face a threat from meat alternatives including plant protein and cultured meat already growing in labs around the world.

Beef farmer and Nuffield Scholar Richard Fowler believes New Zealand meat farmers will have a problem competing with cheaper, healthier, cleaner, more environmentally sustainable alternatives.

Such challenges and opportunities will be the subject of a major conference in Gisborne next month for Maori land owners, farmers and entrepreneurs in the Tairawhiti region.

Some of the leading food futurists and agritech innovators in New Zealand will be among 40 inspirational presenters sharing their insights and experience.

It will be the first Maori agritech-foodtech conference in Tairawhiti, and will be on November 22-24.

‘Ina te Ora’ is the third event in a series of conferences organised by Hikurangi Enterprises with support from Massey University, Eastland Community Trust, the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment, Plant and Food Research and AgResearch.

The event will be held at Muriwai Marae and the Emerald Hotel.

It has also received support from AgResearch, Callaghan Innovation, Plant and Food Research, AUT, University of Waikato and the Ministry for Primary Industries.

“We hope to identify opportunities that food-tech and agri-tech developments can contribute accelerating food production and exports from Tairawhiti,” said co-organiser Panapa Ehau.

“. . . and, through a range of local and visiting speakers, to increase Maori participation and leadership in agritech and food technology innovation.

“We are stoked to have so many high calibre experts — both visiting researchers and entrepreneurs, and our local agribusiness champions — willing to participate in this event and help grow local enterprise.

Mr Ehau said the event has three main goals.

“To share recent technology innovations and research in the food and agricultural sectors, facilitate new connections between local Maori and research organisations, identify opportunities for new research collaborations.”

The organisers expect to attract at least 100 local participants from Maori communities between Mohaka to the south and Potaka to the north, including Maori business and landowners.

“Also local businesses in the food and agricultural sectors, local educators (especially science teachers), technologists, Maori researchers and entrepreneurs.”

Presenters include representatives from Wakatu Incorporation, Robotics Plus, Plant and Food Research, AgResearch, Callaghan Innovation, Massey University, University of Waikato, AUT, Cedenco, Leaderbrand, Ngati Porou Miere, and Ngati Pahauwera Development Trust.

More information and registration online at the Hikurangi Enterprises website: www.hikurangi.enterprises.

A RECENT global study on the future of meat found traditional sheep and beef farmers in the Gisborne region face a threat from meat alternatives including plant protein and cultured meat already growing in labs around the world.

Beef farmer and Nuffield Scholar Richard Fowler believes New Zealand meat farmers will have a problem competing with cheaper, healthier, cleaner, more environmentally sustainable alternatives.

Such challenges and opportunities will be the subject of a major conference in Gisborne next month for Maori land owners, farmers and entrepreneurs in the Tairawhiti region.

Some of the leading food futurists and agritech innovators in New Zealand will be among 40 inspirational presenters sharing their insights and experience.

It will be the first Maori agritech-foodtech conference in Tairawhiti, and will be on November 22-24.

‘Ina te Ora’ is the third event in a series of conferences organised by Hikurangi Enterprises with support from Massey University, Eastland Community Trust, the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment, Plant and Food Research and AgResearch.

The event will be held at Muriwai Marae and the Emerald Hotel.

It has also received support from AgResearch, Callaghan Innovation, Plant and Food Research, AUT, University of Waikato and the Ministry for Primary Industries.

“We hope to identify opportunities that food-tech and agri-tech developments can contribute accelerating food production and exports from Tairawhiti,” said co-organiser Panapa Ehau.

“. . . and, through a range of local and visiting speakers, to increase Maori participation and leadership in agritech and food technology innovation.

“We are stoked to have so many high calibre experts — both visiting researchers and entrepreneurs, and our local agribusiness champions — willing to participate in this event and help grow local enterprise.

Mr Ehau said the event has three main goals.

“To share recent technology innovations and research in the food and agricultural sectors, facilitate new connections between local Maori and research organisations, identify opportunities for new research collaborations.”

The organisers expect to attract at least 100 local participants from Maori communities between Mohaka to the south and Potaka to the north, including Maori business and landowners.

“Also local businesses in the food and agricultural sectors, local educators (especially science teachers), technologists, Maori researchers and entrepreneurs.”

Presenters include representatives from Wakatu Incorporation, Robotics Plus, Plant and Food Research, AgResearch, Callaghan Innovation, Massey University, University of Waikato, AUT, Cedenco, Leaderbrand, Ngati Porou Miere, and Ngati Pahauwera Development Trust.

More information and registration online at the Hikurangi Enterprises website: www.hikurangi.enterprises.

It will be the first Maori agritech-foodtech conference in Tairawhiti, and will be on November 22-24.

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