Three-day field trip to Tutira

LAKE TUTIRA: The work done around the environmentally-troubled Lake Tutira (pictured) will be a focus on a three-day field trip to Tutira. Bookings for the trip are still available. File picture

THE Gisborne-East Coast Farm Forestry association has a three-day trip planned to Tutira in Hawke’s Bay next week and a focus will be the work done by Hawke’s Bay Regional Council around the environmentally-troubled lake.

Bookings for the trip are still available.

The field trip begins next Friday with lunch at the lake and then a meeting with regional council representatives.

“They will outline the extensive work that has been done on the lands they administer around the lake,” said association spokesman Nick Seymour.

“The Tutira Regional Park is a public park with camping facilities and an extensive network of walking tracks.”

The field-trip party will stay at the Tutira Lodge Friday and Saturday nights.

“On Saturday morning, we visit the local arboretum with board members and their curator, and also meet with Linda Newstrom-Lloyd who will explain the work she is doing with ‘trees for bees’,” Mr Seymour said.

That afternoon, they will look at the extensive tree planting on the nearby Mantell-Harding block, also administered by the regional council.

“Much of that planting involves eucalypt species and there are some very impressive redwoods.

“On Sunday morning, we visit Holt’s forest, a 15-hectare forest planted by Harold Holt and his wife in 1933, in which there are about 500 different species.”

Mr Seymour said they also hoped to visit Lake Opuahi near the Tutira Lodge.

“It’s a small lake protected by a predator fence and used as a Kiwi creche.”

The field trip returns to Gisborne that afternoon.

“We are taking a mini bus at $50 a head, the lodge costs $100 for the two nights B&B.”

Bookings can be made through John McLean on: 868 6440.

THE Gisborne-East Coast Farm Forestry association has a three-day trip planned to Tutira in Hawke’s Bay next week and a focus will be the work done by Hawke’s Bay Regional Council around the environmentally-troubled lake.

Bookings for the trip are still available.

The field trip begins next Friday with lunch at the lake and then a meeting with regional council representatives.

“They will outline the extensive work that has been done on the lands they administer around the lake,” said association spokesman Nick Seymour.

“The Tutira Regional Park is a public park with camping facilities and an extensive network of walking tracks.”

The field-trip party will stay at the Tutira Lodge Friday and Saturday nights.

“On Saturday morning, we visit the local arboretum with board members and their curator, and also meet with Linda Newstrom-Lloyd who will explain the work she is doing with ‘trees for bees’,” Mr Seymour said.

That afternoon, they will look at the extensive tree planting on the nearby Mantell-Harding block, also administered by the regional council.

“Much of that planting involves eucalypt species and there are some very impressive redwoods.

“On Sunday morning, we visit Holt’s forest, a 15-hectare forest planted by Harold Holt and his wife in 1933, in which there are about 500 different species.”

Mr Seymour said they also hoped to visit Lake Opuahi near the Tutira Lodge.

“It’s a small lake protected by a predator fence and used as a Kiwi creche.”

The field trip returns to Gisborne that afternoon.

“We are taking a mini bus at $50 a head, the lodge costs $100 for the two nights B&B.”

Bookings can be made through John McLean on: 868 6440.

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