Hikurangi Hemp welcomes plans to increase production

NURSERY: Hikurangi Hemp already has plants growing and products under development for medical research purposes.

AN East Coast company developing medical cannabis products is excited about proposed Government legislation to increase domestic production.

The Misuse of Drugs Amendment Bill tabled yesterday will allow for a regulated domestic cannabis industry, make medicinal cannabis products more accessible and let the terminally-ill use illicit cannabis.

“This is great news for the medical cannabis patients in New Zealand, who will have access to much more affordable products that are verified as safe and prescribed by doctors,” said Hikurangi Hemp managing director Manu Caddie.

Hikurangi Hemp had plants growing and products under development for medical research purposes.

The legislation would allow cannabinoids extracted from New Zealand plants to be made into approved medicines for sale here and overseas.

“This decision is great timing for us just before we go to investors in February to raise money to expand our operation and fund the facilities required by MedSafe for the plant processing,” Mr Caddie said.

Results of clinical trials proving the safety of their products are expected at the end of next year.

“We will be able to provide a safe, affordable product next year,” Mr Caddie said.

“This is more than many of the imported products can claim.”

Hikurangi Hemp was also pleased to see CBD, or cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic chemical with a wide range of health benefits, would no longer be considered a controlled drug.

“This has massive implications for patients and the industry, and goes much farther than what we were expecting in yesterday’s announcement.

“This presents a huge opportunity for provincial New Zealand in terms of utilising local skills and local land in a sustainable industry experiencing massive global growth.”

Health Minister Dr David Clark said there was increasing evidence to support the use of medicinal cannabis.

“In time, this legislation will result in a greater supply of quality medicinal cannabis, including products made here in New Zealand.”

Based on the Australian experience, it was likely to take up to 24 months before medicinal cannabis was manufactured and sold in New Zealand, Dr Clark said.

“However, there will be people who cannot wait. So, as an interim measure, the legislation will create a legal defence for possession and use of illicit cannabis for people who are expected by their doctors to be in their last year of life.”

The introduction of the bill yesterday is the first stage of making it into law.

It will be supported by New Zealand First and the Green Party, but National is yet to say whether it will back the new medicinal cannabis legislation, with leader Bill English saying they would wait to see the detail.

The bill will allow patients with a prescription to access medicinal cannabis at a pharmacy.

An advisory committee will be set up to review the requirements for prescribing medicinal cannabis, set minimum product quality standards and allow domestic cultivation and manufacture of medicinal cannabis products.

Under the United Nations Drug Convention, a government agency will be required to oversee the scheme.

AN East Coast company developing medical cannabis products is excited about proposed Government legislation to increase domestic production.

The Misuse of Drugs Amendment Bill tabled yesterday will allow for a regulated domestic cannabis industry, make medicinal cannabis products more accessible and let the terminally-ill use illicit cannabis.

“This is great news for the medical cannabis patients in New Zealand, who will have access to much more affordable products that are verified as safe and prescribed by doctors,” said Hikurangi Hemp managing director Manu Caddie.

Hikurangi Hemp had plants growing and products under development for medical research purposes.

The legislation would allow cannabinoids extracted from New Zealand plants to be made into approved medicines for sale here and overseas.

“This decision is great timing for us just before we go to investors in February to raise money to expand our operation and fund the facilities required by MedSafe for the plant processing,” Mr Caddie said.

Results of clinical trials proving the safety of their products are expected at the end of next year.

“We will be able to provide a safe, affordable product next year,” Mr Caddie said.

“This is more than many of the imported products can claim.”

Hikurangi Hemp was also pleased to see CBD, or cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic chemical with a wide range of health benefits, would no longer be considered a controlled drug.

“This has massive implications for patients and the industry, and goes much farther than what we were expecting in yesterday’s announcement.

“This presents a huge opportunity for provincial New Zealand in terms of utilising local skills and local land in a sustainable industry experiencing massive global growth.”

Health Minister Dr David Clark said there was increasing evidence to support the use of medicinal cannabis.

“In time, this legislation will result in a greater supply of quality medicinal cannabis, including products made here in New Zealand.”

Based on the Australian experience, it was likely to take up to 24 months before medicinal cannabis was manufactured and sold in New Zealand, Dr Clark said.

“However, there will be people who cannot wait. So, as an interim measure, the legislation will create a legal defence for possession and use of illicit cannabis for people who are expected by their doctors to be in their last year of life.”

The introduction of the bill yesterday is the first stage of making it into law.

It will be supported by New Zealand First and the Green Party, but National is yet to say whether it will back the new medicinal cannabis legislation, with leader Bill English saying they would wait to see the detail.

The bill will allow patients with a prescription to access medicinal cannabis at a pharmacy.

An advisory committee will be set up to review the requirements for prescribing medicinal cannabis, set minimum product quality standards and allow domestic cultivation and manufacture of medicinal cannabis products.

Under the United Nations Drug Convention, a government agency will be required to oversee the scheme.

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Faith Winigrey, Tokoroa - 1 month ago
I am following the stories and posts with great interest.

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