Cutting-edge rural communications on show at Wairoa's Farm Expo next month

File picture

CUTTING-edge rural communications will once again be high on the agenda at this year’s East Coast Farming Expo in Wairoa with several communication specialists among the exhibitors.

The Expo will be staged at the Wairoa A and P Showgrounds on April 11 and 12.

The communications exhibitors include Colvins and Gisborne Net.

Expo director Dave Martin said communication on farms needed to be as “real time” as possible, to enable more timely and accurate decision making.

“The old saying ‘knowledge is power’ is more relevant today than ever because of the speed at which modern business operates.

“Being remote no longer needs to be a barrier to operating effectively in the modern farming business environment,” Mr Martin said.

“Increasing broadband speeds and cell phone coverage, combined with online sale reports, cloud recording and banking and financial programmes allows many farmers to have the same instant access to decision-making tools as if they were in an urban business environment.”

Award-winning Gisborne radio communications company, Colvins, will attend the Expo for the second time.

Biggest recent development with radio communication has been the advancement of the digital radio platform

Manager Scott McSloy said the biggest development with radio communication in recent times had been the advancement of the digital radio platform.

“Digital radio not only provides better voice clarity, but also allows packets of data to be sent over the network.”

Colvins have installed over 30 on-farm communication systems over the past few years in the East Coast region.

“The vast majority of these communication systems use solar-powered repeaters that we have specifically developed for the purpose,” Mr McSloy said.

“Being solar-powered allows the repeater to be placed at a convenient location where the most property coverage is achieved.”

The units are relatively portable, so they can be easily moved if necessary.

“Feedback received from customers after using the system is that they could no longer do without it.

“The radio system has become an integral part of their farming operation.

Lastest comms technology is able to provide options such as welfare monitoring, man down alerts and GPS tracking

“While still primarily used for voice communication to enhance the efficiency of a farming operation, the same on-farm communication system is also able to provide a number of health and safety options including welfare monitoring, man down alerts and GPS tracking.

“The radio system can also be used to provide remote monitoring, control and alarms,” Mr McSloy said.

Colvins will have that equipment on display and operating at the Expo.

Gisborne Net’s Ronald Brice said they will be at the Expo not only to discuss the extent of their current coverage but where they expect to grow around the Wairoa, Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne regions.

“We’re keen to start conversations with those living in the region about coverage and what customers expect when it comes to their internet requirements,” Mr Brice said.

“If there are people out there without coverage, we would like to know, and to find out how best to provide that coverage.”

The company, which has recently received a Rural Broadband Initiative grant, brought the first internet service to Gisborne in 1995.

They use a land-based microwave radio network to deliver fast, low cost internet throughout Gisborne, the East Coast and Wairoa.

Mr Brice said getting more technology on the farm and more communications was always going to help with safety on the land, but stresses there are many benefits to an increase in technology and improved communications in the rural sector.

“Getting data out and things like weather forecasts, which are obtained online, can help farmers to plan ahead properly.”

CUTTING-edge rural communications will once again be high on the agenda at this year’s East Coast Farming Expo in Wairoa with several communication specialists among the exhibitors.

The Expo will be staged at the Wairoa A and P Showgrounds on April 11 and 12.

The communications exhibitors include Colvins and Gisborne Net.

Expo director Dave Martin said communication on farms needed to be as “real time” as possible, to enable more timely and accurate decision making.

“The old saying ‘knowledge is power’ is more relevant today than ever because of the speed at which modern business operates.

“Being remote no longer needs to be a barrier to operating effectively in the modern farming business environment,” Mr Martin said.

“Increasing broadband speeds and cell phone coverage, combined with online sale reports, cloud recording and banking and financial programmes allows many farmers to have the same instant access to decision-making tools as if they were in an urban business environment.”

Award-winning Gisborne radio communications company, Colvins, will attend the Expo for the second time.

Biggest recent development with radio communication has been the advancement of the digital radio platform

Manager Scott McSloy said the biggest development with radio communication in recent times had been the advancement of the digital radio platform.

“Digital radio not only provides better voice clarity, but also allows packets of data to be sent over the network.”

Colvins have installed over 30 on-farm communication systems over the past few years in the East Coast region.

“The vast majority of these communication systems use solar-powered repeaters that we have specifically developed for the purpose,” Mr McSloy said.

“Being solar-powered allows the repeater to be placed at a convenient location where the most property coverage is achieved.”

The units are relatively portable, so they can be easily moved if necessary.

“Feedback received from customers after using the system is that they could no longer do without it.

“The radio system has become an integral part of their farming operation.

Lastest comms technology is able to provide options such as welfare monitoring, man down alerts and GPS tracking

“While still primarily used for voice communication to enhance the efficiency of a farming operation, the same on-farm communication system is also able to provide a number of health and safety options including welfare monitoring, man down alerts and GPS tracking.

“The radio system can also be used to provide remote monitoring, control and alarms,” Mr McSloy said.

Colvins will have that equipment on display and operating at the Expo.

Gisborne Net’s Ronald Brice said they will be at the Expo not only to discuss the extent of their current coverage but where they expect to grow around the Wairoa, Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne regions.

“We’re keen to start conversations with those living in the region about coverage and what customers expect when it comes to their internet requirements,” Mr Brice said.

“If there are people out there without coverage, we would like to know, and to find out how best to provide that coverage.”

The company, which has recently received a Rural Broadband Initiative grant, brought the first internet service to Gisborne in 1995.

They use a land-based microwave radio network to deliver fast, low cost internet throughout Gisborne, the East Coast and Wairoa.

Mr Brice said getting more technology on the farm and more communications was always going to help with safety on the land, but stresses there are many benefits to an increase in technology and improved communications in the rural sector.

“Getting data out and things like weather forecasts, which are obtained online, can help farmers to plan ahead properly.”

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    ​Do you support nurses in their rejection of pay and working condition offers, and their plan to strike twice next month?