New leader of primary industries at EIT

Nigel Udy has a background in teaching, academic leadership, programme development and industry liaison

Nigel Udy has a background in teaching, academic leadership, programme development and industry liaison

Nigel Udy

EIT’s School of Primary Industries has a new leader as it moves towards playing a bigger role in supporting the regional economy.

Nigel Udy, has a significant background in teaching, academic leadership, programme development and industry liaison.

After completing his degree and postgraduate studies in agricultural commerce and agricultural science at Lincoln University, Mr Udy was a farm consultant in south Otago before joining the primary industry education sector at Telford in Balclutha. He has been involved ever since, including a few years at Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre in Wairarapa. He joined EIT in 2016.

“It’s an exciting time to be involved as we have recently commenced a review to identify how we can best meet the needs of the Hawke’s Bay and Tairawhiti communities and primary industry.”

The review, under the leadership of strategic projects leader Glen Harkness for EIT, is aimed at identifying the priorities and focus of the school going forward.

It was being done in consultation with the various industry sectors and community groups and is aimed at meeting their requirements.

“We will see some new directions emerging from that,” he said.

“Our staff are closely involved with the horticulture and agricultural sectors and also have strong links with conservation, apiculture and forestry,” he said.

“We are reviewing how to meet the training requirement of all these industries.”

New programmes were already evolving both here and in Hawke’s Bay to meet the needs of the apple and kiwifruit sectors, which were growing rapidly.

“We are also developing a joint venture in macadamia nut production to increase the level of skills in nursery and nut production.”

Another relatively new area was apiculture, with EIT catering to 60 students in Tairawhiti in four different locations and the next intake about to start.

“In agriculture we are supporting the Primary ITO in delivering a range of programmes including the new agribusiness diploma programme. But there was still a strong focus on agricultural vehicle skills and health and safety.”

Another area of strong growth was in commercial road transport, in which EIT was working closely with the industry to meet the nationwide shortage of truck drivers.

“We have some very skilled staff with significant industry experience who are passionate about passing on their knowledge and skills,” said Mr Udy.

The school was also working with various Government agencies to assist the community with riparian care, revegetation and erosion control. In conjunction with the community and various iwi they had also developed marae-based courses on sustainable primary production — mahinga kai — using traditional food growing and management techniques.

EIT’s School of Primary Industries has a new leader as it moves towards playing a bigger role in supporting the regional economy.

Nigel Udy, has a significant background in teaching, academic leadership, programme development and industry liaison.

After completing his degree and postgraduate studies in agricultural commerce and agricultural science at Lincoln University, Mr Udy was a farm consultant in south Otago before joining the primary industry education sector at Telford in Balclutha. He has been involved ever since, including a few years at Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre in Wairarapa. He joined EIT in 2016.

“It’s an exciting time to be involved as we have recently commenced a review to identify how we can best meet the needs of the Hawke’s Bay and Tairawhiti communities and primary industry.”

The review, under the leadership of strategic projects leader Glen Harkness for EIT, is aimed at identifying the priorities and focus of the school going forward.

It was being done in consultation with the various industry sectors and community groups and is aimed at meeting their requirements.

“We will see some new directions emerging from that,” he said.

“Our staff are closely involved with the horticulture and agricultural sectors and also have strong links with conservation, apiculture and forestry,” he said.

“We are reviewing how to meet the training requirement of all these industries.”

New programmes were already evolving both here and in Hawke’s Bay to meet the needs of the apple and kiwifruit sectors, which were growing rapidly.

“We are also developing a joint venture in macadamia nut production to increase the level of skills in nursery and nut production.”

Another relatively new area was apiculture, with EIT catering to 60 students in Tairawhiti in four different locations and the next intake about to start.

“In agriculture we are supporting the Primary ITO in delivering a range of programmes including the new agribusiness diploma programme. But there was still a strong focus on agricultural vehicle skills and health and safety.”

Another area of strong growth was in commercial road transport, in which EIT was working closely with the industry to meet the nationwide shortage of truck drivers.

“We have some very skilled staff with significant industry experience who are passionate about passing on their knowledge and skills,” said Mr Udy.

The school was also working with various Government agencies to assist the community with riparian care, revegetation and erosion control. In conjunction with the community and various iwi they had also developed marae-based courses on sustainable primary production — mahinga kai — using traditional food growing and management techniques.

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