Cadets learn finer points of the wool industry

WOOL TUITION: The five first year students involved in the Waipaoa Farm cadet training programme got some tuition this week from wool expert Ross Buscke. The Carrfields Primary Wool consultant took them through fault recognition. grading and sale preparation at the company’s wool store in Lowe Street. (From left) Mr Buscke, Jack Du Toit (Whakatane), Jack Hirst (Gisborne), Owen Pengelly (North Auckland) Ollie Holst (North Auckland) and Matt Austin (Te Awamutu). Picture by Liam Clayton

The first year students on the Waipaoa Station Farm Cadet Training Scheme got to grips with the finer detail of the wool industry on Tuesday when they spent some time with Carrfields Primary Wool consultant Ross Buscke.

The long-time wool section head steward at the A&P Spring Show talked the five trainee farmers through wool classing and wool preparation prior to sale.

“We started out by teaching them how to recognise faults, things like Bathurst Burr, that make wool unmarketable.

“Then the need to separate out the wool with brand markings on it, and green bacteria.

“We moved on to recognising and selecting good types of fleece wool, and how to ensure the colour and length of the valuable second shear wool does not mix together,” Mr Buscke said.

They moved on to fat lamb wool handling.

“I also talked to them about the value of dags, the strongest wool there is. A lot chuck any black wool in with it and that’s a no-no.”

The cadets were also shown how wool gets prepared for display in the sales.

“It’s great to see these boys so keen and participating in the interests of wool, because they are the future of farming”

Cadet Jack Hirst from Gisborne said the year was going well for them.

“The practical and theory sides of farming we’re learning about on the course is really good.”

Owen Pengelly from North Auckland said breaking in their own dogs had been a highlight of the year to-date.

“Overall the year’s going good for us.”

The cadets also attended the monthly cattle fair at Matawhero earlier in the day on Tuesday.

The first year students on the Waipaoa Station Farm Cadet Training Scheme got to grips with the finer detail of the wool industry on Tuesday when they spent some time with Carrfields Primary Wool consultant Ross Buscke.

The long-time wool section head steward at the A&P Spring Show talked the five trainee farmers through wool classing and wool preparation prior to sale.

“We started out by teaching them how to recognise faults, things like Bathurst Burr, that make wool unmarketable.

“Then the need to separate out the wool with brand markings on it, and green bacteria.

“We moved on to recognising and selecting good types of fleece wool, and how to ensure the colour and length of the valuable second shear wool does not mix together,” Mr Buscke said.

They moved on to fat lamb wool handling.

“I also talked to them about the value of dags, the strongest wool there is. A lot chuck any black wool in with it and that’s a no-no.”

The cadets were also shown how wool gets prepared for display in the sales.

“It’s great to see these boys so keen and participating in the interests of wool, because they are the future of farming”

Cadet Jack Hirst from Gisborne said the year was going well for them.

“The practical and theory sides of farming we’re learning about on the course is really good.”

Owen Pengelly from North Auckland said breaking in their own dogs had been a highlight of the year to-date.

“Overall the year’s going good for us.”

The cadets also attended the monthly cattle fair at Matawhero earlier in the day on Tuesday.

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