PB Hunt's fundraising trek on Te Hau Station was a big hit

river crossing: Poverty Bay Hunt’s fundraising horse trek at Te Hau Station. Here riders approach the headwaters of the Waipaoa River at Mangatu. Pictures supplied
Riding out from base camp at Te Hau woolshed
Stunning vistas: Looking down the Valley from Te Hau towards Te Karaka
Companion: John Larsen on Sugar (borrowed from Alex and Megen Campbell).

MORE than 80 riders took part in the Poverty Bay Hunt’s 15th annual trek last weekend based at Te Hau Station woolshed at Whatatutu, with riders from all over the North Island.

The riders travelled from as far away as Northland, Otaki, Hawera and Wairarapa.

“They enjoyed trekking over wonderful scenic country including other neighbouring stations,” said master of the hunt Nikki McHugh.

“They trekked and camped for three days, backed up by the Poverty Bay Hunt’s famous hospitality.”

Hunt members and supporters donated, baked and prepared food for the trek.

“It is not only our major fundraiser but also a wonderful team-building exercise for members, as well as a social event.

“The Hunt is grateful to all the landowners whose properties were ridden over and especially Te Hau general manager Josh Kelleher and wife Kate, who both rode. “Many of the trekkers were people with a farming background interested in seeing new country and different farming operations, or people with an interest in horses who enjoy the challenges and fun trekking has to offer.”

She said some participants had been to most of the previous 14 treks.

One rider said: “It was a great way to see some country and meet up with people.”

Mrs McHugh said they were looking forward to the next one, which the Hunt hopes to hold up the East Coast this time next year.

“Now this one is over it’s time to get horses and hounds fit and ready for the opening hunt on March 23 at Whatatutu.”

MORE than 80 riders took part in the Poverty Bay Hunt’s 15th annual trek last weekend based at Te Hau Station woolshed at Whatatutu, with riders from all over the North Island.

The riders travelled from as far away as Northland, Otaki, Hawera and Wairarapa.

“They enjoyed trekking over wonderful scenic country including other neighbouring stations,” said master of the hunt Nikki McHugh.

“They trekked and camped for three days, backed up by the Poverty Bay Hunt’s famous hospitality.”

Hunt members and supporters donated, baked and prepared food for the trek.

“It is not only our major fundraiser but also a wonderful team-building exercise for members, as well as a social event.

“The Hunt is grateful to all the landowners whose properties were ridden over and especially Te Hau general manager Josh Kelleher and wife Kate, who both rode. “Many of the trekkers were people with a farming background interested in seeing new country and different farming operations, or people with an interest in horses who enjoy the challenges and fun trekking has to offer.”

She said some participants had been to most of the previous 14 treks.

One rider said: “It was a great way to see some country and meet up with people.”

Mrs McHugh said they were looking forward to the next one, which the Hunt hopes to hold up the East Coast this time next year.

“Now this one is over it’s time to get horses and hounds fit and ready for the opening hunt on March 23 at Whatatutu.”

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you think more or less of Jacinda Ardern after the Prime Minister ruled out a capital gains tax under her leadership?