Food expertise to help in Nepal

TIPS FROM GROWERS: Several Save the Children Fund staff involved in food production in Nepal are in Gisborne currently learning from local food producers. They were pictured at Leaderbrand in Tucker Road yesterday. (From left) Michael Hicklin from Leaderbrand, Durga Acharya and Deepak Budhathoki from Save the Children International Nepal, and former rural development adviser Nick Coyne.
Picture by Paul Rickard

They are part of a study tour looking at agricultural practices in New Zealand.

The group arrived here on Thursday.

“The focus is on vegetable production techniques, integrated pest management, post-harvest handling and marketing,” said SCI programmes director Andrew Johnson.

“The opportunity to learn from New Zealand growers will be invaluable to continuing to improve the livelihoods of the communities living in Udayapur in Nepal.

“New Zealand expertise will be used to improve vegetable growing techniques which will provide increased food security for the communities.”

Mr Johnson said the boost in income will also ensure more children were able to go to school.

“That will give them greater opportunities for the future.”

The group have toured vegetable production sites in Pukekohe.

Their senior technical co-ordinator Durga Prasad Acharya said their programme in the remote communities of Udayapur started in June 2014.

“The impact of the project is far-reaching.

“When we started, most families were only able to feed their children for six months a year,” he said.

“To date 2352 farmers have been trained in vegetable farming, increasing their household incomes, their ability to withstand weather events, and to provide nutritious food for their children.

“The children can attend school because they are no longer needed to help with the family’s work or mind younger siblings while the parents work,” Mr Acharya said.

“The increased family income also means that girls are less likely to be sent away to work where they may be exposed to exploitation and abuse.”

The group visited LeaderBrand and Hauiti Incorporation yesterday. Other visits include Corson Grain, Ormond Valley Organics, MPV Produce, GizzyTru packhouse and a citrus orchard before they leave on Wednesday, June 19.

They are part of a study tour looking at agricultural practices in New Zealand.

The group arrived here on Thursday.

“The focus is on vegetable production techniques, integrated pest management, post-harvest handling and marketing,” said SCI programmes director Andrew Johnson.

“The opportunity to learn from New Zealand growers will be invaluable to continuing to improve the livelihoods of the communities living in Udayapur in Nepal.

“New Zealand expertise will be used to improve vegetable growing techniques which will provide increased food security for the communities.”

Mr Johnson said the boost in income will also ensure more children were able to go to school.

“That will give them greater opportunities for the future.”

The group have toured vegetable production sites in Pukekohe.

Their senior technical co-ordinator Durga Prasad Acharya said their programme in the remote communities of Udayapur started in June 2014.

“The impact of the project is far-reaching.

“When we started, most families were only able to feed their children for six months a year,” he said.

“To date 2352 farmers have been trained in vegetable farming, increasing their household incomes, their ability to withstand weather events, and to provide nutritious food for their children.

“The children can attend school because they are no longer needed to help with the family’s work or mind younger siblings while the parents work,” Mr Acharya said.

“The increased family income also means that girls are less likely to be sent away to work where they may be exposed to exploitation and abuse.”

The group visited LeaderBrand and Hauiti Incorporation yesterday. Other visits include Corson Grain, Ormond Valley Organics, MPV Produce, GizzyTru packhouse and a citrus orchard before they leave on Wednesday, June 19.

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