Top season celebrated

Helping out: At the Poverty Bay Dog Trial Centre’s prizegiving, Mark McLean (left) from Ngatapa Dog Trial Club was bestowed the NZ Farmer Merit Award for services to dog trialling. He received it from Trevor Brown (centre), as centre president Colin Bayliss looked on. Picture supplied

The Poverty Bay Dog Trial Centre celebrated its best season ever when it comes to national competitions, with a well-attended annual prizegiving at the Vines on Friday, July 26.

At the South Island championships, Jo Waugh won the zigzag hunt, becoming the first woman to win a title at the competition.

Colin Bayliss finished with a second and a fourth, and Allen Irwin took a fourth placing.

At the North Island and New Zealand championships, Henry Gaddum won the North Island short head, and Noddy Halley won the North Island zigzag hunt. They finished seventh and fifth in their respective New Zealand finals.

Ruie Bridge was third in the North Island long head and sixth in the New Zealand final.

Leo Edginton was fifth in the North Island straight hunt and fourth in the national final.

Centre champions were awarded at the prizegiving, where Gaddum was the long head winner, Edginton the short head, Ruie Bridge the zigzag, and Tim Lamont the straight hunt.

Noddy Halley and Lad won the Shackleton Memorial Cup in the heading dogs, and Sam Shaw and Shade the Waerenga-o-Kuri Cup for the hunts. She also won the trophy for the best two-dog team.

Edginton won the Buscke-Watson shield for the most consistent heading dog.

Brad McHardy took home the trophy for the most consistent huntaway.

The trophy for the most improved maiden and intermediate competitor in the heads — the Rod Mead Tray — went to Hamish Mead.

McHardy won the Alice and Ernie Robinson Tray for the most improved maiden and intermediate competitor in the hunts. He also won the BDO Cup for most points by a competitor aged under 25.

Mark McLean from the Ngatapa Dog Trial Club received the NZ Farmer Merit Award for services to dog trialling. Trevor Brown presented it to him and said: “If it was not for guys like Mark, our clubs would not function.”

Ross Buscke said: “Mark’s helped liberate sheep at trials, supplied sheep, run the refreshments department and always with a smile and some cheek.”

Triallists will now look forward to the J and T Hickey Charity trials next month.

The Poverty Bay Dog Trial Centre celebrated its best season ever when it comes to national competitions, with a well-attended annual prizegiving at the Vines on Friday, July 26.

At the South Island championships, Jo Waugh won the zigzag hunt, becoming the first woman to win a title at the competition.

Colin Bayliss finished with a second and a fourth, and Allen Irwin took a fourth placing.

At the North Island and New Zealand championships, Henry Gaddum won the North Island short head, and Noddy Halley won the North Island zigzag hunt. They finished seventh and fifth in their respective New Zealand finals.

Ruie Bridge was third in the North Island long head and sixth in the New Zealand final.

Leo Edginton was fifth in the North Island straight hunt and fourth in the national final.

Centre champions were awarded at the prizegiving, where Gaddum was the long head winner, Edginton the short head, Ruie Bridge the zigzag, and Tim Lamont the straight hunt.

Noddy Halley and Lad won the Shackleton Memorial Cup in the heading dogs, and Sam Shaw and Shade the Waerenga-o-Kuri Cup for the hunts. She also won the trophy for the best two-dog team.

Edginton won the Buscke-Watson shield for the most consistent heading dog.

Brad McHardy took home the trophy for the most consistent huntaway.

The trophy for the most improved maiden and intermediate competitor in the heads — the Rod Mead Tray — went to Hamish Mead.

McHardy won the Alice and Ernie Robinson Tray for the most improved maiden and intermediate competitor in the hunts. He also won the BDO Cup for most points by a competitor aged under 25.

Mark McLean from the Ngatapa Dog Trial Club received the NZ Farmer Merit Award for services to dog trialling. Trevor Brown presented it to him and said: “If it was not for guys like Mark, our clubs would not function.”

Ross Buscke said: “Mark’s helped liberate sheep at trials, supplied sheep, run the refreshments department and always with a smile and some cheek.”

Triallists will now look forward to the J and T Hickey Charity trials next month.

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