Modern day feminism

How can we effect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feels welcome to participate in the conversation?

How can we effect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feels welcome to participate in the conversation?

Hermione Granger
Camellia Japonica or Rose of winter or Theaceae vintage engraving. Old engraved illustration of a beautiful Camellia Flower
Camellia Japonica or Rose of winter or Theaceae vintage engraving. Old engraved illustration of a beautiful Camellia Flower
Camellia Japonica or Rose of winter or Theaceae vintage engraving. Old engraved illustration of a beautiful Camellia Flower
“It’s a really good idea because it gives students a chance to express their opinions so more than one person can hear it.” — Jake Redd, 14.
“It gives teenagers an area for self expression and to make teenagers feel like their opinion matters.” — Daniel Henry, 16.
“I think it’s good that teenagers can voice their opinions and be heard.” — Maddy Notting, 14.
“It’s not a forced thing. It’s their choice what they want to put in. It’s a place where they can speak their mind.” — Cole Rosie, 13.

Hermione Granger ­— a heroine well known to our generation — not only battles the oppression of wizards in a fictional world, but acts as a symbol for modern day feminism.

Now, you’re probably wondering how on earth a fictional Harry Potter character could be labelled a ‘feminist’.

Emma Watson is one of the activists I follow — she brought the strong-willed witch to life on screen.

Now as the UN Women Goodwill Ambassador, Emma highlights issues that have and continue to underpin gender equality throughout society today.

International Women’s Day on March 8 brought to the surface a global celebration of conversations surrounding the respect and appreciation of women, as well as conversations around political, economic and social achievements.

Feminism goes hand in hand with this globally recognised day — alongside the goal of the liberation of all women from inequality and subservient positions, when compared to their male counterparts.

During my childhood I had strong male influences, which included my Dad and three older brothers — meaning I had little exposure to feminism until a couple of years ago via social media. Today I can finally recognise and appreciate its influence.

I am proud to say I am part of a movement of new-age feminists who continue to fight for gender equality as it is a human rights issue.

Often the word ‘feminism’ has negative connotations because there are misconceptions resulting from incorrect information about feminism.

Society should strive towards the definition of feminism that stands for equal rights for all, regardless of where they place themselves on the gender spectrum.

Feminism for me should always strive to be intersectional, fighting for the rights of all women; including transsexual women, women of all ethnicities in developed and developing countries and women of all social classes. From the importance of equal pay between men and women for the same job, to the significance of young women’s rights — for example in Sub-Saharan African, where they continue a fight to gain access to equal secondary and tertiary education.

No one should ever be neglected and pigeonholed. In the words of Emma Watson, “How can we effect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feels welcome to participate in the conversation?”

Hermione Granger ­— a heroine well known to our generation — not only battles the oppression of wizards in a fictional world, but acts as a symbol for modern day feminism.

Now, you’re probably wondering how on earth a fictional Harry Potter character could be labelled a ‘feminist’.

Emma Watson is one of the activists I follow — she brought the strong-willed witch to life on screen.

Now as the UN Women Goodwill Ambassador, Emma highlights issues that have and continue to underpin gender equality throughout society today.

International Women’s Day on March 8 brought to the surface a global celebration of conversations surrounding the respect and appreciation of women, as well as conversations around political, economic and social achievements.

Feminism goes hand in hand with this globally recognised day — alongside the goal of the liberation of all women from inequality and subservient positions, when compared to their male counterparts.

During my childhood I had strong male influences, which included my Dad and three older brothers — meaning I had little exposure to feminism until a couple of years ago via social media. Today I can finally recognise and appreciate its influence.

I am proud to say I am part of a movement of new-age feminists who continue to fight for gender equality as it is a human rights issue.

Often the word ‘feminism’ has negative connotations because there are misconceptions resulting from incorrect information about feminism.

Society should strive towards the definition of feminism that stands for equal rights for all, regardless of where they place themselves on the gender spectrum.

Feminism for me should always strive to be intersectional, fighting for the rights of all women; including transsexual women, women of all ethnicities in developed and developing countries and women of all social classes. From the importance of equal pay between men and women for the same job, to the significance of young women’s rights — for example in Sub-Saharan African, where they continue a fight to gain access to equal secondary and tertiary education.

No one should ever be neglected and pigeonholed. In the words of Emma Watson, “How can we effect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feels welcome to participate in the conversation?”

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