Jakob’s Dictionary entry two: Relief

Words can hurt like a knife in the back.

Words can hurt like a knife in the back.

Re - lief (noun)

1. A feeling of reassurance and relaxation following release from anxiety or distress

THE feeling of relief usually happens when a huge stress is lifted off your shoulders.

I have to say I miss the feeling. It feels as if the last time that I was relieved was when I got back to Gisborne after my last round of chemotherapy.

The constant overbearing weight of cancer is daunting and no matter how hard you try, it stays, which is not always your fault.

Sometimes someone will say something to bring it back. Some people’s ignorance can make you feel sick or just plain annoyed. It is not that they don’t know, it’s that most of them should know.

The people that you talk to lots or that consider themselves close to you. They are the ones that get under your skin.

I am fine with someone asking questions, but make sure that they are relevant and word them in a way that is positive because words do hurt.

Everybody knows the saying ‘sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me’. But words do hurt.

Not always in the way you think, but they can have a deeper meaning.

For example, if you asked your nana how she was, she would probably say something like ‘good’ or ‘fine’.

I know that “how are you?” is an innocent question, but asking a kid on chemotherapy how they are brings up a whole lot of questions in our heads.

Am I really fine or OK? Why is my body cancerous? Is it something I have done?

I usually reply with something like “ehhh” which in reality means that I am stuck in a body that feels like it is fighting a losing battle.

Words can hurt like a knife in the back.

When talking to someone — either to their face or via instant messaging — think about what you say because you can either be that knife in the back, or their relief. Relief. Relief. The cool feeling of lost stress.

Relief.

Re - lief (noun)

1. A feeling of reassurance and relaxation following release from anxiety or distress

THE feeling of relief usually happens when a huge stress is lifted off your shoulders.

I have to say I miss the feeling. It feels as if the last time that I was relieved was when I got back to Gisborne after my last round of chemotherapy.

The constant overbearing weight of cancer is daunting and no matter how hard you try, it stays, which is not always your fault.

Sometimes someone will say something to bring it back. Some people’s ignorance can make you feel sick or just plain annoyed. It is not that they don’t know, it’s that most of them should know.

The people that you talk to lots or that consider themselves close to you. They are the ones that get under your skin.

I am fine with someone asking questions, but make sure that they are relevant and word them in a way that is positive because words do hurt.

Everybody knows the saying ‘sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me’. But words do hurt.

Not always in the way you think, but they can have a deeper meaning.

For example, if you asked your nana how she was, she would probably say something like ‘good’ or ‘fine’.

I know that “how are you?” is an innocent question, but asking a kid on chemotherapy how they are brings up a whole lot of questions in our heads.

Am I really fine or OK? Why is my body cancerous? Is it something I have done?

I usually reply with something like “ehhh” which in reality means that I am stuck in a body that feels like it is fighting a losing battle.

Words can hurt like a knife in the back.

When talking to someone — either to their face or via instant messaging — think about what you say because you can either be that knife in the back, or their relief. Relief. Relief. The cool feeling of lost stress.

Relief.

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