IT IS MY BODY

When I am constantly asking myself, how could I let myself appear this way? When in reality this is who I am.

My body, my lips, my psoriasis, my hips, pimples, freckles, boobs and butt. It is all a part of me.

There are days when the pressure just engulfs me. Days when I feel alone, days when I feel disappointment and days when I crack.

Not many people are comfortable with talking about what makes them feel insecure, especially when it revolves around their body. Some might even think that it is shallow to talk about one’s body in such a way. Others see it as a ploy for attention.

I can talk about myself in such a way but trust me, it is not for attention.

Many say that it is just a phase, something that all teenage girls go through. But the truth is . . . it is not.

The truth is that we are not the only people who have to deal with insecurities about our body. It is a lie when we are told that it is all in our heads — we will never be perfect no matter how much we try.

There are people who write and speak lies, they say it is just us, that it is puberty, “just a girl thing”; that we are not yet capable of understanding the physiological factors that are associated with body image.

Insecurity affects all of us no matter what age, sex or race we are.

I am sure that we have all at least once heard our mothers complain about their ever changing body. Or when we all got our first pimple. Or the time that our grandparents compared themselves to what they once used to look like.

More than 90 percent of females surveyed in a New Zealand health poll answered that they wanted to change at least one aspect of their bodies. If I am quite honest it does not surprise me, however next time you feel ashamed about your body, just remember that you are not alone and that others can help you. We all have those days.

I think the most common reason we feel insecure is because we are made to believe that we are supposed to look like the most photographed people on the earth — celebrities.

It is funny, the most common female celebrity is either slim or curvy. We can admit that some are naturally built this way, however many have undergone treatments, such as plastic surgery or implants to change the way they look.

It is weird that the people we look up to, the people that we admire are changing who they are. They are changing what makes them special, what makes them different from others.

They are changing their natural body because of an insecurity.

We at times believe that they are perfect when in fact they are just like us. Celebrities have the same wish for change, redefining how women feel they should look.

If a celebrity is seen to change an aspect of their body, then we seem to ask ourselves, “does that mean I, with the same problem, am inferior”? Take Kylie Jenner for example, she has in recent months enhanced the size of her lips because it was an insecurity of hers. It was something she hated so much that she felt it was necessary to change it.

So then what does that mean for me? Someone who has small lips?

She is no longer unique. Just another plastic model of what beauty is thought to be, but not what beauty actually is.

Beauty is not about being perfect it is about our imperfections. Instead of perfection we will be ourselves, insecure or not, flawless or not, gorgeous or not.

We need to learn to be happy with our bodies, because it is a short life that we have, if we spend it worrying about how we look and comparing ourselves to others we will get only to a place of unhappiness. However, if we learn to accept what God gave us and learn to love what makes us different, we will live.

We will live in place where we are perfect because we accept that our insecurities are what make us unique.

Being insecure about your body does not make you weak, because you are not the only person to feel uncomfortable in your own skin.

Children, teenagers, adults, celebrities — we all feel insecure sometimes. We are just scared that we are not perfect but perfect are those who accept who they are.

When I am constantly asking myself, how could I let myself appear this way? When in reality this is who I am.

My body, my lips, my psoriasis, my hips, pimples, freckles, boobs and butt. It is all a part of me.

There are days when the pressure just engulfs me. Days when I feel alone, days when I feel disappointment and days when I crack.

Not many people are comfortable with talking about what makes them feel insecure, especially when it revolves around their body. Some might even think that it is shallow to talk about one’s body in such a way. Others see it as a ploy for attention.

I can talk about myself in such a way but trust me, it is not for attention.

Many say that it is just a phase, something that all teenage girls go through. But the truth is . . . it is not.

The truth is that we are not the only people who have to deal with insecurities about our body. It is a lie when we are told that it is all in our heads — we will never be perfect no matter how much we try.

There are people who write and speak lies, they say it is just us, that it is puberty, “just a girl thing”; that we are not yet capable of understanding the physiological factors that are associated with body image.

Insecurity affects all of us no matter what age, sex or race we are.

I am sure that we have all at least once heard our mothers complain about their ever changing body. Or when we all got our first pimple. Or the time that our grandparents compared themselves to what they once used to look like.

More than 90 percent of females surveyed in a New Zealand health poll answered that they wanted to change at least one aspect of their bodies. If I am quite honest it does not surprise me, however next time you feel ashamed about your body, just remember that you are not alone and that others can help you. We all have those days.

I think the most common reason we feel insecure is because we are made to believe that we are supposed to look like the most photographed people on the earth — celebrities.

It is funny, the most common female celebrity is either slim or curvy. We can admit that some are naturally built this way, however many have undergone treatments, such as plastic surgery or implants to change the way they look.

It is weird that the people we look up to, the people that we admire are changing who they are. They are changing what makes them special, what makes them different from others.

They are changing their natural body because of an insecurity.

We at times believe that they are perfect when in fact they are just like us. Celebrities have the same wish for change, redefining how women feel they should look.

If a celebrity is seen to change an aspect of their body, then we seem to ask ourselves, “does that mean I, with the same problem, am inferior”? Take Kylie Jenner for example, she has in recent months enhanced the size of her lips because it was an insecurity of hers. It was something she hated so much that she felt it was necessary to change it.

So then what does that mean for me? Someone who has small lips?

She is no longer unique. Just another plastic model of what beauty is thought to be, but not what beauty actually is.

Beauty is not about being perfect it is about our imperfections. Instead of perfection we will be ourselves, insecure or not, flawless or not, gorgeous or not.

We need to learn to be happy with our bodies, because it is a short life that we have, if we spend it worrying about how we look and comparing ourselves to others we will get only to a place of unhappiness. However, if we learn to accept what God gave us and learn to love what makes us different, we will live.

We will live in place where we are perfect because we accept that our insecurities are what make us unique.

Being insecure about your body does not make you weak, because you are not the only person to feel uncomfortable in your own skin.

Children, teenagers, adults, celebrities — we all feel insecure sometimes. We are just scared that we are not perfect but perfect are those who accept who they are.

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