Review: Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid’s Tale is a feminist masterpiece. Adapted from the 1985 Margaret Atwood novel, it explores a different post-apocalyptic landscape from what we are used to.

It is a theocratic sexist society where, due to disease and pollution, human life is teetering on the edge of non-existence. The repercussions of this allow the control of Gilead, a reformed United States where women are subjected to menial positions without power, and surrogacy is forced onto the few remaining fertile women to reproduce for Gilead’s elite.

Offred is one of these women, a Handmaiden, and it is through her eyes that we see the majority of the story, as it plays out over a 10-episode season.

Created by Bruce Miller, the producer of The 100, this is his most stunning work yet.

Elisabeth Moss is sensational as Offred, but what else can we expect from Elizabeth Moss, former star of Mad Men (another show I binge-watched religiously).

Many of the shots are focused under her hood, where she communicates exactly what Offred/June is thinking, in a way that only an actress of her talent can do. Samira Wiley, of Orange is the New Black, is also incredible as Moira, Offred’s strong-willed friend, with many other noteworthy performances from Alexis Bledel, Ann Dowd, Joseph Fiennes, and Yvonne Strahovski.

The Handmaid’s Tale is difficult to fault, addictive and borderline emotionally-draining. It has striking moments of humanity and survival, and what shines through overall are the themes and the warnings delivered between layers of skillfully written dialogue and character development.

The Handmaid’s Tale sheds light on a woman’s role and how it has changed over time, focusing on themes like sexuality and sexism.

It’s interesting to see how quickly society adjusts to Gilead. This is an interesting point of discussion, as many of the ideas behind the uprising of this totalitarian theocratic society can be related to many people today — especially in Trump’s America, where women’s rights are continuously being sidelined in favour of religious values.

This cautionary tale couldn’t have come at a better time, and is interesting to see how we can relate it to today’s world, with questions surrounding rape culture, femininity, and masculinity.

For some, Gilead is a haven, a reformed world; prosperous. For others, it is hell.

I thought the themes of the show were relevant and scripted in such a way that gave you an emotional connection to the characters.

The cinematography is beautiful and convincing, the dialogue sincere. Whether there will be a second season has not been revealed, but The Handmaid’s Tale is worth the watch. As a forewarning, there are depictions of rape and the show isn’t for the fainthearted, with its gritty and graphic depictions of survival.

The Handmaid’s Tale is at the pinnacle of good television and deserves its 100 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating as well as 5 stars from me.

The Handmaid’s Tale is a feminist masterpiece. Adapted from the 1985 Margaret Atwood novel, it explores a different post-apocalyptic landscape from what we are used to.

It is a theocratic sexist society where, due to disease and pollution, human life is teetering on the edge of non-existence. The repercussions of this allow the control of Gilead, a reformed United States where women are subjected to menial positions without power, and surrogacy is forced onto the few remaining fertile women to reproduce for Gilead’s elite.

Offred is one of these women, a Handmaiden, and it is through her eyes that we see the majority of the story, as it plays out over a 10-episode season.

Created by Bruce Miller, the producer of The 100, this is his most stunning work yet.

Elisabeth Moss is sensational as Offred, but what else can we expect from Elizabeth Moss, former star of Mad Men (another show I binge-watched religiously).

Many of the shots are focused under her hood, where she communicates exactly what Offred/June is thinking, in a way that only an actress of her talent can do. Samira Wiley, of Orange is the New Black, is also incredible as Moira, Offred’s strong-willed friend, with many other noteworthy performances from Alexis Bledel, Ann Dowd, Joseph Fiennes, and Yvonne Strahovski.

The Handmaid’s Tale is difficult to fault, addictive and borderline emotionally-draining. It has striking moments of humanity and survival, and what shines through overall are the themes and the warnings delivered between layers of skillfully written dialogue and character development.

The Handmaid’s Tale sheds light on a woman’s role and how it has changed over time, focusing on themes like sexuality and sexism.

It’s interesting to see how quickly society adjusts to Gilead. This is an interesting point of discussion, as many of the ideas behind the uprising of this totalitarian theocratic society can be related to many people today — especially in Trump’s America, where women’s rights are continuously being sidelined in favour of religious values.

This cautionary tale couldn’t have come at a better time, and is interesting to see how we can relate it to today’s world, with questions surrounding rape culture, femininity, and masculinity.

For some, Gilead is a haven, a reformed world; prosperous. For others, it is hell.

I thought the themes of the show were relevant and scripted in such a way that gave you an emotional connection to the characters.

The cinematography is beautiful and convincing, the dialogue sincere. Whether there will be a second season has not been revealed, but The Handmaid’s Tale is worth the watch. As a forewarning, there are depictions of rape and the show isn’t for the fainthearted, with its gritty and graphic depictions of survival.

The Handmaid’s Tale is at the pinnacle of good television and deserves its 100 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating as well as 5 stars from me.

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