Holiday exploration

A RELAXING holiday in Taupo was exactly what I needed after a long and busy term at school.

Our family played the roles of typical tourists, taking lots of photos and visiting all of the popular tourist attractions Taupo has to offer.

One of my favourite places was the magnificent Huka Falls. Among other adventures such as geothermal walks, shopping, hot pools, rock climbing and visiting the local museum, there was something incredibly tranquil and relaxing about Huka Falls. As we arrived at the falls, tourists from New Zealand and other countries crowded in the carpark, cameras hanging from straps around their necks, accompanied by sunglasses, hats and faces filled with pure excitement!

The moment we set foot outside of the car, the incredible sound of the water rushing and flowing down the river hit us, dominating the excited chatter, chirping birds and clicking cameras.

On the bridge above the river, the view was magnificent. Upriver, the baby blue liquid was unusually calm and flat, resembling a pond.

As the river narrowed, the water was pressed into a tight funnel, 200,000 litres per second barrelling down.

Cascading down rocks, creating immense currents towards the waterfall itself.

The water was evidently clear and transparent, combined with whitewash which swirled and frothed on the surface.

The sides of the bank were eroded from the huge pressure of its sheer volume, leaving bare and exposed rocks, wet from spray being expelled into the air.

Above, vegetation and plants covered the wall of rock not reached by the flow itself.

The rushing sound, surprisingly was not the least bit invasive, but rather relaxing and mesmerising — watching it continuously travel and race down the river, causing spray and droplets of water to be fired up, dispersing into the air.

At the falls, the magnificent body tumbled down a few metres, causing a frenzy of whitewash.

The absolute power and strength of it all was unfathomable — and after the heavy rain, nothing stood a chance against it.

Huka Falls will always remain an invincible, impressive and brilliant natural wonder of New Zealand.

A RELAXING holiday in Taupo was exactly what I needed after a long and busy term at school.

Our family played the roles of typical tourists, taking lots of photos and visiting all of the popular tourist attractions Taupo has to offer.

One of my favourite places was the magnificent Huka Falls. Among other adventures such as geothermal walks, shopping, hot pools, rock climbing and visiting the local museum, there was something incredibly tranquil and relaxing about Huka Falls. As we arrived at the falls, tourists from New Zealand and other countries crowded in the carpark, cameras hanging from straps around their necks, accompanied by sunglasses, hats and faces filled with pure excitement!

The moment we set foot outside of the car, the incredible sound of the water rushing and flowing down the river hit us, dominating the excited chatter, chirping birds and clicking cameras.

On the bridge above the river, the view was magnificent. Upriver, the baby blue liquid was unusually calm and flat, resembling a pond.

As the river narrowed, the water was pressed into a tight funnel, 200,000 litres per second barrelling down.

Cascading down rocks, creating immense currents towards the waterfall itself.

The water was evidently clear and transparent, combined with whitewash which swirled and frothed on the surface.

The sides of the bank were eroded from the huge pressure of its sheer volume, leaving bare and exposed rocks, wet from spray being expelled into the air.

Above, vegetation and plants covered the wall of rock not reached by the flow itself.

The rushing sound, surprisingly was not the least bit invasive, but rather relaxing and mesmerising — watching it continuously travel and race down the river, causing spray and droplets of water to be fired up, dispersing into the air.

At the falls, the magnificent body tumbled down a few metres, causing a frenzy of whitewash.

The absolute power and strength of it all was unfathomable — and after the heavy rain, nothing stood a chance against it.

Huka Falls will always remain an invincible, impressive and brilliant natural wonder of New Zealand.

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    Should consultation on Gisborne city wastewater treatment and disposal include a “do nothing” option as suggested by the Mayor on Thursday, as well as the five options priced at estimated capital costs of $23.5 million to $42.1m which were approved by councillors?