Hair-icure

Justine tries a hair treatment

Justine tries a hair treatment

Stock photo
beauty hair

Women are so mean to their hair. They subject it to all manner of indignities — even torture — and still expect it to behave nicely when called upon. In fact, when it does not oblige, that’s a good enough excuse for some women to be exceedingly angry and tear their hair out.

As soon as a female is old enough to wield a comb or brush, the abuse begins. The hair is teased with back combs to make it tall, scorched with hot irons to make it straight, wound in tight circles to make it curl, plaited to keep it under control, stuck with pins to create a certain look, lathered in lotions to give it body, drowned in spray to give it hold, doused in dye to make it blonder, darker, less mousy or less grey . . . anything but what it is.

So once in a while be kind to your hair. After all, women pamper themselves with facials, massages, pedicures and manicures and so why not TLC for hair — a hair-acure.

With my mistreated locks in mind, I’ve been trialling a hair-icure product for the last three months.

The Kerastase Densifique hair density and fullness programme comes in a smart silver box with 30 little vials of serum and a list of credentials a mile long.

The technical blurb tells me for the first time in the history of hair care, Kérastase ventures into a new stage in the control of follicle biology by introducing glycobiology, the study of glycans.

“Densifique’s new formula combines Stemoxydine with Complex Gycan, promising hair which is thicker, more luxurious and dense with better hair quality, vitality and strength . . . and up to 1700 new hairs.”

I’ve never been terribly impressed with such claims so I put it to the test and I’d have to say my hair is definitely in better condition and has more fullness and volume than before I began the treatment.

Even our daughters on a Skype call from the other side of the world noticed an improvement.

That’s the proof. That’s the litmus test.

Women are so mean to their hair. They subject it to all manner of indignities — even torture — and still expect it to behave nicely when called upon. In fact, when it does not oblige, that’s a good enough excuse for some women to be exceedingly angry and tear their hair out.

As soon as a female is old enough to wield a comb or brush, the abuse begins. The hair is teased with back combs to make it tall, scorched with hot irons to make it straight, wound in tight circles to make it curl, plaited to keep it under control, stuck with pins to create a certain look, lathered in lotions to give it body, drowned in spray to give it hold, doused in dye to make it blonder, darker, less mousy or less grey . . . anything but what it is.

So once in a while be kind to your hair. After all, women pamper themselves with facials, massages, pedicures and manicures and so why not TLC for hair — a hair-acure.

With my mistreated locks in mind, I’ve been trialling a hair-icure product for the last three months.

The Kerastase Densifique hair density and fullness programme comes in a smart silver box with 30 little vials of serum and a list of credentials a mile long.

The technical blurb tells me for the first time in the history of hair care, Kérastase ventures into a new stage in the control of follicle biology by introducing glycobiology, the study of glycans.

“Densifique’s new formula combines Stemoxydine with Complex Gycan, promising hair which is thicker, more luxurious and dense with better hair quality, vitality and strength . . . and up to 1700 new hairs.”

I’ve never been terribly impressed with such claims so I put it to the test and I’d have to say my hair is definitely in better condition and has more fullness and volume than before I began the treatment.

Even our daughters on a Skype call from the other side of the world noticed an improvement.

That’s the proof. That’s the litmus test.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you think the benefits of forestry to the region outweigh its negative impacts?
    See also: