Marvellous Malta

Malta always seems to be celebrating something.

Malta always seems to be celebrating something.

Fort Saint Angelo.
The cat sculpture in Sliema.
Gozo from the harbour.
Valletta, the Maltese capital.
Maltese Festival Street decorations.

MALTA — what a wonderful destination. The four days we stayed there were really well spent.

Malta is so vibrant, it seems the island is always celebrating something. We were there during one of the religious festivals — we never quite worked out which one — but it involved bedecking the streets with the most lavish drapes, religious effigies and a barrage of fireworks that continued from 8am until 12pm the whole time we were there.

The people were just as erratic on their narrow streets as their mainland counterparts but they were easier for us to avoid as they drove on the left side of the road.

We used their extensive bus service to explore the island including a bus, ferry, bus ride to the island of Gozo.

The cost of living seemed a bit higher in Malta compared to the other places we had been on our travels but the big bonus for us was finding a piece of decent steak.

Valletta is the capital city of Malta. It is in the central-eastern portion of the main island of Malta having its western coast with access to the Marsamxett Harbour and its eastern coast in the Grand Harbour. It is a registered UNESCO site and one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world.

Fort Saint Angelo, a large bastioned fort in Birgu located at the centre of the Grand Harbour, is an impressive sight.It was originally built in the medieval period as a castle.

Also eye-catching is the huge cat sculpture which can be seen at Independence Garden while walking the promenade in Sliema, a town on the north-east coast of Malta. It was created by sculptor Matthew Pandolfino and placed there during the Sliema Art Festival.

MALTA — what a wonderful destination. The four days we stayed there were really well spent.

Malta is so vibrant, it seems the island is always celebrating something. We were there during one of the religious festivals — we never quite worked out which one — but it involved bedecking the streets with the most lavish drapes, religious effigies and a barrage of fireworks that continued from 8am until 12pm the whole time we were there.

The people were just as erratic on their narrow streets as their mainland counterparts but they were easier for us to avoid as they drove on the left side of the road.

We used their extensive bus service to explore the island including a bus, ferry, bus ride to the island of Gozo.

The cost of living seemed a bit higher in Malta compared to the other places we had been on our travels but the big bonus for us was finding a piece of decent steak.

Valletta is the capital city of Malta. It is in the central-eastern portion of the main island of Malta having its western coast with access to the Marsamxett Harbour and its eastern coast in the Grand Harbour. It is a registered UNESCO site and one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world.

Fort Saint Angelo, a large bastioned fort in Birgu located at the centre of the Grand Harbour, is an impressive sight.It was originally built in the medieval period as a castle.

Also eye-catching is the huge cat sculpture which can be seen at Independence Garden while walking the promenade in Sliema, a town on the north-east coast of Malta. It was created by sculptor Matthew Pandolfino and placed there during the Sliema Art Festival.

About Malta:

The Maltese archipelago lies at the centre of the Mediterranean, 93km south of Sicily and 288km north of Africa. It consists of three islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino with a total population of over 400,000 inhabitants.

Declared a republic in 1964 when it gained independence from Britain, Malta is known for historic sites related to a succession of rulers including the Romans, Moors, Knights of Saint John, French and British.

It has numerous fortresses, megalithic temples and the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum, a subterranean complex of halls and burial chambers dating to circa 4000BC.

— Wikipedia

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