Nicotine spray helps smokers break the habit

Successful trials another positive step

Successful trials another positive step

Tairawhiti Hauora’s Public Health Physician Dr Anura Jaysinghe.
Quickmist spray provides quick and lasting relief for nicotine cravings within 60 seconds and a maximum effect after 10 minutes.

Tairawhiti Hauora's Public Health Physician Dr Anura Jaysinghe talks about his Nicotine Replacement Therapy pilot project that introduced mouth spray to Wairoa smokers wanting to quit.

A Gisborne researcher has taken the findings of an innovative smokefree project he designed and implemented to the international stage. Tairawhiti Hauora’s Public Health Physician, Dr Anura Jaysinghe, was a guest speaker at the 2017 15th World Congress on Public Health in Australia, and shared the “challenges and successes” of a Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) pilot project that introduced nicotine mouth spray to Wairoa smokers wanting to quit.

The project’s goal was to design and implement a new smokefree pathway for Wairoa people to help increase the number of sustained quit attempts by introducing nicotine mouth spray for support. Dr Jaysinghe said the Wairoa Smokefree service model was successful for an isolated community like Wairoa and nicotine mouth spray encouraged people to initiate a quit attempt.

“The project also showed that collaboration with local smokefree service providers and GPs is vital in designing a service and providing user-friendly smokefree services. Whakawhanaungatanga (connecting bonds) through a local Maori provider gave a striking outcome for success,” he said.

Taki Tahi Toa Mano - Tairawhiti Smokefree Coalition chairwoman Nicolette Pomana says the project was another positive step in the direction of Tairawhiti and New Zealand becoming smokefree by 2025. She was thrilled Dr Jaysinghe delivered the presentation he had prepared for the international conference to the Taki Tahi Toa Mano - Tairawhiti smokefree coalition meeting.

Dr Jaysinghe’s two-year pilot programme follows successful trials in Canada, Australia, Sweden and Germany. The nicotine spray “Quickmist” gradually weans the heavy smoker off their habit, reducing the number of nicotine cravings they experience over several weeks or months. Quickmist spray provides quick and lasting relief for nicotine cravings within 60 seconds and a maximum effect after 10 minutes.

Dr Jayasinghe said it was much faster than the traditional NRT like lozenges and the spray was 2.5 times more effective. Quickmist contains 150 shots of sprays and each spray gives 1mg of nicotine. It’s applied on the inside cheek or under the tongue. A cigarette contains around 10mg of nicotine and 1mg of nicotine is absorbed with each cigarette smoked, he says.

“This pilot model was specifically designed for Wairoa and 16 percent of clients successfully quit smoking at the end of three months service.”

Wairoa district has a population of 7890 and of the total population 59.4 percent are Maori. Smoking prevalence among Maori is twice that of non-Maori, he says.

“The project also had a strong focus on the high prevalence of tobacco usage in youth and pregnant Maori women.”

Tairawhiti Hauora's Public Health Physician Dr Anura Jaysinghe talks about his Nicotine Replacement Therapy pilot project that introduced mouth spray to Wairoa smokers wanting to quit.

A Gisborne researcher has taken the findings of an innovative smokefree project he designed and implemented to the international stage. Tairawhiti Hauora’s Public Health Physician, Dr Anura Jaysinghe, was a guest speaker at the 2017 15th World Congress on Public Health in Australia, and shared the “challenges and successes” of a Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) pilot project that introduced nicotine mouth spray to Wairoa smokers wanting to quit.

The project’s goal was to design and implement a new smokefree pathway for Wairoa people to help increase the number of sustained quit attempts by introducing nicotine mouth spray for support. Dr Jaysinghe said the Wairoa Smokefree service model was successful for an isolated community like Wairoa and nicotine mouth spray encouraged people to initiate a quit attempt.

“The project also showed that collaboration with local smokefree service providers and GPs is vital in designing a service and providing user-friendly smokefree services. Whakawhanaungatanga (connecting bonds) through a local Maori provider gave a striking outcome for success,” he said.

Taki Tahi Toa Mano - Tairawhiti Smokefree Coalition chairwoman Nicolette Pomana says the project was another positive step in the direction of Tairawhiti and New Zealand becoming smokefree by 2025. She was thrilled Dr Jaysinghe delivered the presentation he had prepared for the international conference to the Taki Tahi Toa Mano - Tairawhiti smokefree coalition meeting.

Dr Jaysinghe’s two-year pilot programme follows successful trials in Canada, Australia, Sweden and Germany. The nicotine spray “Quickmist” gradually weans the heavy smoker off their habit, reducing the number of nicotine cravings they experience over several weeks or months. Quickmist spray provides quick and lasting relief for nicotine cravings within 60 seconds and a maximum effect after 10 minutes.

Dr Jayasinghe said it was much faster than the traditional NRT like lozenges and the spray was 2.5 times more effective. Quickmist contains 150 shots of sprays and each spray gives 1mg of nicotine. It’s applied on the inside cheek or under the tongue. A cigarette contains around 10mg of nicotine and 1mg of nicotine is absorbed with each cigarette smoked, he says.

“This pilot model was specifically designed for Wairoa and 16 percent of clients successfully quit smoking at the end of three months service.”

Wairoa district has a population of 7890 and of the total population 59.4 percent are Maori. Smoking prevalence among Maori is twice that of non-Maori, he says.

“The project also had a strong focus on the high prevalence of tobacco usage in youth and pregnant Maori women.”

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