Perfect palms: Get ready for tropical nights

A bangalow palm in the garden of Colin and Pat Henderson, Pyes Pa. Gardening page


BOP 18apr08 -

FROM LEFT: The fronds of a bangalow palm catch the autumn sun

PICTURE / SANDRA SIMPSON 100408SS13

WHETHER it’s palms, roses or the promise of a great summer, enjoy all the gardening delights that October and November have to offer.

If you’re after a tropical look for your garden or indoor spaces then palms are a must and their long arching and graceful foliage also helps add a vertical dimension to the garden. There is a wide variety of palms to choose from, whether you have a large sunny garden, a small shady spot or a well lit indoor room that needs a lovely dash of greenery.

Palms for sunny garden spots:

* Golden cane palm (Dypsis lutescens)

* Bangalow palm (Archonontophoenix cunninghamiana)

* Chinese fan palm (Livistona chinensis)

Palms for shaded spots:

* Lady palm (Rhapis excelsa)

* Cascade palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum)

* Walking stick palm (Linospadix monostachya)

Palms for indoors:

* Parlour palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

* Kentia palm (Howea forsteriana)

* Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii)

The key steps to keep your palms healthy:

* Well drained soil or a pot with good drainage holes filled with a good quality potting mix.

* When planting a new palm into the garden, enrich the soil first by mixing in some dynamic lifter organic plant food.

* During the warmer months feed indoor and outdoor palms each fortnight with thrive all purpose liquid plant food.

* Yellowing palm leaves can be a sign of magnesium deficiency. Applied as a foliar spray, leaf greener magnesium chelate is a fast acting source of magnesium to help green up palm foliage.

Rose care tips to help keep them looking fabulous

The gorgeous rose blooms that you’ve been waiting patiently for are also being eagerly anticipated by some very hungry caterpillars. Caterpillars can chew through and into rose buds as well as eating leaves. Control these destructive caterpillars by spraying roses thoroughly every two weeks, including the undersides of foliage where caterpillars often hide, with Yates rose gun advanced. Other common insect pests of roses such as aphids, thrips and scale will also be controlled with rose gun advanced, together with the dreaded diseases rose black spot and powdery mildew.

Keep feeding roses every week with Thrive roses and flowers liquid plant food. It’s a complete plant food that contains the additional potassium that roses need to help put on a fantastic flower show. It’s as easy as mixing 1 – 2 capfuls of thrive roses & flowers liquid plant food in a 9 L watering can and applying over the foliage and root zone (the nutrients in Thrive can be absorbed by both the leaves and the roots).

Also take the opportunity to refresh or apply mulch around the base of rose bushes. Mulching has several benefits:

* It helps reduce the amount of water splashing up from the soil onto the leaves, which decreases the risk of leaf diseases.

* Mulch helps to keep the soil moist and protect the delicate top soil from baking sun.

* Organic mulches, such as bark chips and Lucerne straw, will break down over time and add valuable organic matter to the soil.

Silverbeet that thinks it’s spinach

Yates silverbeet ‘perpetual green’ is an easy and quick to grow, spinach-like mild flavoured silverbeet with smooth leaves and slim, green stalks. It provides a prolific harvest of succulent leaves for more than a year and resists bolting to seed.

Here’s the easy how-to for growing silverbeet perpetual green, in either a sunny vegie patch or pots:

1. Sow seed direct where they are to grow or in trays or punnets of black magic seed raising mix. Cover lightly, firm down and keep moist. Transplant or thin out when seedlings are around 6 – 8 cm high.

2. Feed your silverbeet every 1 - 2 weeks with thrive fish blood and bone to promote healthy growth and a great harvest. It’s a complete and balanced plant food containing the goodness of natural fish from the southern oceans plus soil conditioning humates, boosted with additional nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

3. Harvest leaves regularly, which will promote continued growth. Harvest by pulling rather than cutting.

Keep a watch for aphids, which can be attracted to and damage the tender young silverbeet leaves. Control aphids by spraying each week with nature’s way natrasoap vegie insect gun, which is a soap based spray that’s certified for use in organic gardening. Also monitor for snails and slugs, which can be controlled with a light sprinkling of Blitzem snail and slug pellets.

Pay off your mortgage with tomatoes

There are a few different versions of the origins of the Mortgage Lifter variety of tomato, however the most popular seems to be based around a man known as Radiator Charlie. In the 1930s, Marshall Cletis Byles worked at a repair shop in a small town in West Virginia in the United States. His specialty was repairing truck radiators, hence the nickname.

Desperate financial times during the Great Depression forced Marshall to look for additional income and he decided to try breeding a large tomato to help feed hungry families. With minimal horticultural experience he started to cross pollinate four different tomatoes (including the variety Beefsteak) and over several years developed a large and tasty tomato which was first known as Radiator Charlie’s Tomato. He had great success selling the seedlings and was able to pay off his mortgage with the proceeds. The tomato became known as Radiator Charlie’s Mortgage Lifter and is now sold worldwide as Mortgage Lifter.

The tomato produces very large, great tasting pinkish fruit which can weigh up to 1.5 kg. That’s one impressive tomato Radiator Charlie! It’s a prolific bearer and must be staked or grown inside a tomato cage.

Here’s how to get your Mortgage Lifter tomatoes started:

* Seed can be sown direct into a sunny vegie patch that’s had the soil enriched with some Thrive natural blood and bone or sown into seedling punnets filled with a good quality seed raising mix like Black Magic seed raising mix.

* Sow seed 6 mm deep, cover with seed raising mix and water gently.

* Keep the soil or seed raising mix moist and seedlings will start to emerge in around 5 – 7 days.

* For seedlings raised in punnets they can be transplanted into their final home when they’re 5 cm tall.

* Water in with some Thrive natural seaweed tonic to help reduce transplant shock and get seedlings off to a great start.

Here’s how to care for your Mortgage Lifter tomatoes:

* Once the seedlings have been in the garden for around a fortnight, start feeding each week with Thrive tomato liquid plant food, which will provide the tomatoes with a balanced diet of nutrients to promote lots of healthy growth and additional potassium to encourage lots of flowers which will turn into delicious fruit.

* Protect tomato pwlants from common insect pests like fruitworm caterpillars, aphids and tomato potato psyllid (TPP) by applying Mavrik gun insect and mite Spray over the foliage every 7 – 14 days.

* Control common tomato diseases such as powdery mildew and blights by spraying plants with Nature’s Way fungus spray every 10 – 14 days, ensuring thorough coverage of foliage.

Grow your own tatsoi

New to the Yates seed range is tasty tatsoi. Sometimes called spoon mustard, it’s a fast growing tangy and versatile Asian green which is delicious served raw, lightly steamed or sautéed. Leaves can also be wilted in a warm dressing or added as a garnish to soup.

With a mild and sweet mustard taste similar to bok choy, tatsoi’s interesting spoon shaped leaves are rich in vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Here’s how to grow your own tatsoi:

1. Sow seed 6 – 12 mm deep direct into a sunny or partly shaded garden bed or pot. Cover with Black Magic seed raising mix, firm down and keep moist.

2. Seed will germinate in 4 – 10 days.

3. Once the seedlings are established, feed each week with Thrive natural fish and seaweed.

4. Tatsoi will reach maturity in just 7 weeks. Harvest leaves continuously to promote lots of fresh new growth – plants will continue to grow and can be repeat harvested.

Pest control tip:

Tatsoi is a member of the brassica family and can be susceptible to the same types of damage from caterpillars and aphids as broccoli, cabbage and kale. Spray tatsoi foliage each week with pyrethrum and oil citrus spray as soon as caterpillars or aphids start to appear.

Sweet sweet corn

If you have a few spare square metres in a sunny spot in your garden, then try growing some sweet corn.

How to grow your own corn:

* Enrich the soil in a sunny garden bed by mixing in some dynamic lifter organic Plant Food. It’s best to grow corn in blocks of short rows (rather than long thin rows), which helps to improve pollination and yield.

* Sow corn seeds in pairs, 25 mm deep, in moist well drained soil direct where they are to grow. No further watering is needed until seedlings appear. The weaker of the two seedlings can be thinned out when they reach around 15 cm tall.

* Corn is a hungry plant and should be fed each week with plant food

* Pick cobs when the fine ‘silk’ has just browned.

Grow your own turmeric

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a member of the ginger family and is best known for the bright orange fleshed aromatic rhizomes that are used as a key spice in Indian curries. Turmeric has also received a fair amount of publicity over recent times, with claims that it could reduce the risk of cancer, has anti inflammatory properties, benefit cardiovascular health, improve blood sugar levels and may assist in reducing the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Turmeric contains high levels of cucurmin, which is thought to be responsible for many of the potential health benefits.

Whether you’re interested in the health aspects of turmeric or just love a good curry, you can try growing some turmeric at home. Turmeric is a herbabceous perennial ‘herb’ that resembles ginger above ground, with long elongated leaves and beautiful white and pale pink flower spikes. The edible rhizomes develop under the soil.

Turmeric needs lots of warmth and moisture, so you’ll need to live in a warm temperate area of New Zealand (or have your own toasty hot house) to be successful. Turmeric rhizomes are available through mail order or specialist nurseries and are planted when then weather warms up in mid to late spring.

Turmeric plants will grow from spring to late autumn and take around 9 months to mature. When the foliage starts to yellow or droop the entire clump of roots can be carefully dug up and separated. Use some in the kitchen and re-plant a few pieces to create next year’s crop. Alternatively, just a few rhizomes can be carefully dug up and the rest of the plant left in the ground.

Here’s how to grow turmeric in the garden:

* Choose a warm sheltered partly shaded location with organic rich, moist, free draining soil. Before planting enrich the soil first with some Yates® Dynamic Lifter® Organic Plant Food.

* Plant the turmeric rhizomes around 40 cm apart and 5 cm deep. Water well and keep moist.

Here’s how to grow turmeric in a pot:

* Choose a pot at least 30 cm in diameter and depth and fill with a good quality potting mix like Yates® Premium Potting Mix.

* Particularly in cool areas, put the pot in a nice warm sheltered spot. Against a sunny north facing wall is ideal.

* Plant the turmeric rhizomes around 20 cm apart and 5 cm deep. Water well and keep moist.

For both garden and pot grown turmeric, keep the soil moist from spring right through to autumn and feed each week with Yates Thrive® Natural Fish & Seaweed. It’s a complete plant food that contains fish, seaweed, humates, microbes, molasses and NPK nutrients and trace elements to promote healthy foliage growth and lots of plump tasty turmeric rhizomes.

Here are some delicious recipe ideas for your home grown turmeric:

* Fish curry with turmeric, ginger and curry leaves http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/79166410/recipe-fish-curry-with-tumeric-ginger-and-curry-leaves

* Curried baked pumpkin

http://www.bite.co.nz/recipe/14271/Curried-baked-pumpkin/

* New potatoes with feta, beans, turmeric and parsley

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/74239751/recipe-new-potatoes-with-feta-beans-turmeric-and-parsley

Or try a turmeric latte using almond, coconut or cow’s milk, freshly grated turmeric root, cinnamon, ginger, coconut oil and honey. Here are the intructions http://www.foodlovers.co.nz/blog/turmeric-latte-new-craze.html

Lovely lemon balm

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a hardy, perennial herb with sweet, lemon-scented leaves that can be used for flavouring drinks, soups, stews, roasts, teas and refreshing summer drinks. It’s reported to have a calming effect and there’s something wonderful about inhaling the scent of a few crushed lemon balm leaves as you wander through the garden or linger on your balcony or courtyard.

The first part of lemon balm’s botanic name, ‘Melissa’, is Latin for bee and lemon balm’s white flowers are a great bee attractor. They make a lovely fast growing border or container plant in a sunny or partly shaded spot. You can also grow lemon balm on a brightly lit windowsill.

Here are the easy how-to steps for growing Yates® Lemon Balm in a garden bed or pot:

1. Sow seed 5 mm deep direct into soil or a pot filled with a quality potting mix like Yates® Premium Potting Mix, firm down and keep moist.

2. Seedlings will emerge in 5 - 10 days. Keep the soil or pot well watered and feed every week with a liquid fertiliser like Yates Thrive® Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food once the seedlings are established.

3. From 8 weeks after sowing, harvest leaves regularly to help promote a continuous supply of deliciously scented leaves.

4. Lemon balm can be pruned back hard in early spring. Pull out any unwanted seedlings as lemon balm can spread themselves through the garden.

WHETHER it’s palms, roses or the promise of a great summer, enjoy all the gardening delights that October and November have to offer.

If you’re after a tropical look for your garden or indoor spaces then palms are a must and their long arching and graceful foliage also helps add a vertical dimension to the garden. There is a wide variety of palms to choose from, whether you have a large sunny garden, a small shady spot or a well lit indoor room that needs a lovely dash of greenery.

Palms for sunny garden spots:

* Golden cane palm (Dypsis lutescens)

* Bangalow palm (Archonontophoenix cunninghamiana)

* Chinese fan palm (Livistona chinensis)

Palms for shaded spots:

* Lady palm (Rhapis excelsa)

* Cascade palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum)

* Walking stick palm (Linospadix monostachya)

Palms for indoors:

* Parlour palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

* Kentia palm (Howea forsteriana)

* Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii)

The key steps to keep your palms healthy:

* Well drained soil or a pot with good drainage holes filled with a good quality potting mix.

* When planting a new palm into the garden, enrich the soil first by mixing in some dynamic lifter organic plant food.

* During the warmer months feed indoor and outdoor palms each fortnight with thrive all purpose liquid plant food.

* Yellowing palm leaves can be a sign of magnesium deficiency. Applied as a foliar spray, leaf greener magnesium chelate is a fast acting source of magnesium to help green up palm foliage.

Rose care tips to help keep them looking fabulous

The gorgeous rose blooms that you’ve been waiting patiently for are also being eagerly anticipated by some very hungry caterpillars. Caterpillars can chew through and into rose buds as well as eating leaves. Control these destructive caterpillars by spraying roses thoroughly every two weeks, including the undersides of foliage where caterpillars often hide, with Yates rose gun advanced. Other common insect pests of roses such as aphids, thrips and scale will also be controlled with rose gun advanced, together with the dreaded diseases rose black spot and powdery mildew.

Keep feeding roses every week with Thrive roses and flowers liquid plant food. It’s a complete plant food that contains the additional potassium that roses need to help put on a fantastic flower show. It’s as easy as mixing 1 – 2 capfuls of thrive roses & flowers liquid plant food in a 9 L watering can and applying over the foliage and root zone (the nutrients in Thrive can be absorbed by both the leaves and the roots).

Also take the opportunity to refresh or apply mulch around the base of rose bushes. Mulching has several benefits:

* It helps reduce the amount of water splashing up from the soil onto the leaves, which decreases the risk of leaf diseases.

* Mulch helps to keep the soil moist and protect the delicate top soil from baking sun.

* Organic mulches, such as bark chips and Lucerne straw, will break down over time and add valuable organic matter to the soil.

Silverbeet that thinks it’s spinach

Yates silverbeet ‘perpetual green’ is an easy and quick to grow, spinach-like mild flavoured silverbeet with smooth leaves and slim, green stalks. It provides a prolific harvest of succulent leaves for more than a year and resists bolting to seed.

Here’s the easy how-to for growing silverbeet perpetual green, in either a sunny vegie patch or pots:

1. Sow seed direct where they are to grow or in trays or punnets of black magic seed raising mix. Cover lightly, firm down and keep moist. Transplant or thin out when seedlings are around 6 – 8 cm high.

2. Feed your silverbeet every 1 - 2 weeks with thrive fish blood and bone to promote healthy growth and a great harvest. It’s a complete and balanced plant food containing the goodness of natural fish from the southern oceans plus soil conditioning humates, boosted with additional nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

3. Harvest leaves regularly, which will promote continued growth. Harvest by pulling rather than cutting.

Keep a watch for aphids, which can be attracted to and damage the tender young silverbeet leaves. Control aphids by spraying each week with nature’s way natrasoap vegie insect gun, which is a soap based spray that’s certified for use in organic gardening. Also monitor for snails and slugs, which can be controlled with a light sprinkling of Blitzem snail and slug pellets.

Pay off your mortgage with tomatoes

There are a few different versions of the origins of the Mortgage Lifter variety of tomato, however the most popular seems to be based around a man known as Radiator Charlie. In the 1930s, Marshall Cletis Byles worked at a repair shop in a small town in West Virginia in the United States. His specialty was repairing truck radiators, hence the nickname.

Desperate financial times during the Great Depression forced Marshall to look for additional income and he decided to try breeding a large tomato to help feed hungry families. With minimal horticultural experience he started to cross pollinate four different tomatoes (including the variety Beefsteak) and over several years developed a large and tasty tomato which was first known as Radiator Charlie’s Tomato. He had great success selling the seedlings and was able to pay off his mortgage with the proceeds. The tomato became known as Radiator Charlie’s Mortgage Lifter and is now sold worldwide as Mortgage Lifter.

The tomato produces very large, great tasting pinkish fruit which can weigh up to 1.5 kg. That’s one impressive tomato Radiator Charlie! It’s a prolific bearer and must be staked or grown inside a tomato cage.

Here’s how to get your Mortgage Lifter tomatoes started:

* Seed can be sown direct into a sunny vegie patch that’s had the soil enriched with some Thrive natural blood and bone or sown into seedling punnets filled with a good quality seed raising mix like Black Magic seed raising mix.

* Sow seed 6 mm deep, cover with seed raising mix and water gently.

* Keep the soil or seed raising mix moist and seedlings will start to emerge in around 5 – 7 days.

* For seedlings raised in punnets they can be transplanted into their final home when they’re 5 cm tall.

* Water in with some Thrive natural seaweed tonic to help reduce transplant shock and get seedlings off to a great start.

Here’s how to care for your Mortgage Lifter tomatoes:

* Once the seedlings have been in the garden for around a fortnight, start feeding each week with Thrive tomato liquid plant food, which will provide the tomatoes with a balanced diet of nutrients to promote lots of healthy growth and additional potassium to encourage lots of flowers which will turn into delicious fruit.

* Protect tomato pwlants from common insect pests like fruitworm caterpillars, aphids and tomato potato psyllid (TPP) by applying Mavrik gun insect and mite Spray over the foliage every 7 – 14 days.

* Control common tomato diseases such as powdery mildew and blights by spraying plants with Nature’s Way fungus spray every 10 – 14 days, ensuring thorough coverage of foliage.

Grow your own tatsoi

New to the Yates seed range is tasty tatsoi. Sometimes called spoon mustard, it’s a fast growing tangy and versatile Asian green which is delicious served raw, lightly steamed or sautéed. Leaves can also be wilted in a warm dressing or added as a garnish to soup.

With a mild and sweet mustard taste similar to bok choy, tatsoi’s interesting spoon shaped leaves are rich in vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Here’s how to grow your own tatsoi:

1. Sow seed 6 – 12 mm deep direct into a sunny or partly shaded garden bed or pot. Cover with Black Magic seed raising mix, firm down and keep moist.

2. Seed will germinate in 4 – 10 days.

3. Once the seedlings are established, feed each week with Thrive natural fish and seaweed.

4. Tatsoi will reach maturity in just 7 weeks. Harvest leaves continuously to promote lots of fresh new growth – plants will continue to grow and can be repeat harvested.

Pest control tip:

Tatsoi is a member of the brassica family and can be susceptible to the same types of damage from caterpillars and aphids as broccoli, cabbage and kale. Spray tatsoi foliage each week with pyrethrum and oil citrus spray as soon as caterpillars or aphids start to appear.

Sweet sweet corn

If you have a few spare square metres in a sunny spot in your garden, then try growing some sweet corn.

How to grow your own corn:

* Enrich the soil in a sunny garden bed by mixing in some dynamic lifter organic Plant Food. It’s best to grow corn in blocks of short rows (rather than long thin rows), which helps to improve pollination and yield.

* Sow corn seeds in pairs, 25 mm deep, in moist well drained soil direct where they are to grow. No further watering is needed until seedlings appear. The weaker of the two seedlings can be thinned out when they reach around 15 cm tall.

* Corn is a hungry plant and should be fed each week with plant food

* Pick cobs when the fine ‘silk’ has just browned.

Grow your own turmeric

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a member of the ginger family and is best known for the bright orange fleshed aromatic rhizomes that are used as a key spice in Indian curries. Turmeric has also received a fair amount of publicity over recent times, with claims that it could reduce the risk of cancer, has anti inflammatory properties, benefit cardiovascular health, improve blood sugar levels and may assist in reducing the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Turmeric contains high levels of cucurmin, which is thought to be responsible for many of the potential health benefits.

Whether you’re interested in the health aspects of turmeric or just love a good curry, you can try growing some turmeric at home. Turmeric is a herbabceous perennial ‘herb’ that resembles ginger above ground, with long elongated leaves and beautiful white and pale pink flower spikes. The edible rhizomes develop under the soil.

Turmeric needs lots of warmth and moisture, so you’ll need to live in a warm temperate area of New Zealand (or have your own toasty hot house) to be successful. Turmeric rhizomes are available through mail order or specialist nurseries and are planted when then weather warms up in mid to late spring.

Turmeric plants will grow from spring to late autumn and take around 9 months to mature. When the foliage starts to yellow or droop the entire clump of roots can be carefully dug up and separated. Use some in the kitchen and re-plant a few pieces to create next year’s crop. Alternatively, just a few rhizomes can be carefully dug up and the rest of the plant left in the ground.

Here’s how to grow turmeric in the garden:

* Choose a warm sheltered partly shaded location with organic rich, moist, free draining soil. Before planting enrich the soil first with some Yates® Dynamic Lifter® Organic Plant Food.

* Plant the turmeric rhizomes around 40 cm apart and 5 cm deep. Water well and keep moist.

Here’s how to grow turmeric in a pot:

* Choose a pot at least 30 cm in diameter and depth and fill with a good quality potting mix like Yates® Premium Potting Mix.

* Particularly in cool areas, put the pot in a nice warm sheltered spot. Against a sunny north facing wall is ideal.

* Plant the turmeric rhizomes around 20 cm apart and 5 cm deep. Water well and keep moist.

For both garden and pot grown turmeric, keep the soil moist from spring right through to autumn and feed each week with Yates Thrive® Natural Fish & Seaweed. It’s a complete plant food that contains fish, seaweed, humates, microbes, molasses and NPK nutrients and trace elements to promote healthy foliage growth and lots of plump tasty turmeric rhizomes.

Here are some delicious recipe ideas for your home grown turmeric:

* Fish curry with turmeric, ginger and curry leaves http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/79166410/recipe-fish-curry-with-tumeric-ginger-and-curry-leaves

* Curried baked pumpkin

http://www.bite.co.nz/recipe/14271/Curried-baked-pumpkin/

* New potatoes with feta, beans, turmeric and parsley

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/74239751/recipe-new-potatoes-with-feta-beans-turmeric-and-parsley

Or try a turmeric latte using almond, coconut or cow’s milk, freshly grated turmeric root, cinnamon, ginger, coconut oil and honey. Here are the intructions http://www.foodlovers.co.nz/blog/turmeric-latte-new-craze.html

Lovely lemon balm

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a hardy, perennial herb with sweet, lemon-scented leaves that can be used for flavouring drinks, soups, stews, roasts, teas and refreshing summer drinks. It’s reported to have a calming effect and there’s something wonderful about inhaling the scent of a few crushed lemon balm leaves as you wander through the garden or linger on your balcony or courtyard.

The first part of lemon balm’s botanic name, ‘Melissa’, is Latin for bee and lemon balm’s white flowers are a great bee attractor. They make a lovely fast growing border or container plant in a sunny or partly shaded spot. You can also grow lemon balm on a brightly lit windowsill.

Here are the easy how-to steps for growing Yates® Lemon Balm in a garden bed or pot:

1. Sow seed 5 mm deep direct into soil or a pot filled with a quality potting mix like Yates® Premium Potting Mix, firm down and keep moist.

2. Seedlings will emerge in 5 - 10 days. Keep the soil or pot well watered and feed every week with a liquid fertiliser like Yates Thrive® Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food once the seedlings are established.

3. From 8 weeks after sowing, harvest leaves regularly to help promote a continuous supply of deliciously scented leaves.

4. Lemon balm can be pruned back hard in early spring. Pull out any unwanted seedlings as lemon balm can spread themselves through the garden.

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