Sun’s out, cameras ready

To make the most of your trusty old camera or bright new Christmas plaything here are some tips for capturing sun-drenched views this summer

To make the most of your trusty old camera or bright new Christmas plaything here are some tips for capturing sun-drenched views this summer

SHOT, BRO: An example of what can be achieved when out and about. Picture by Fujifilm X-Photographer Dennis Radermacher.

It’s that time of year again, when Kiwis can venture outdoors and hike, cycle, drive or wander their way around this beautiful country. To make the most of your trusty old camera or bright new Christmas plaything here are some tips for capturing sun-drenched views this summer.

There are lots of ways to get great shots this summer, even if the weather doesn’t always play ball. Take your time with shots and don’t use point-and click settings. Many cameras have manual settings so you can take shots like the professionals.

GET UP A LITTLE EARLIER OR STAY OUT A LITTLE LONGER

The best light is as close to the golden hour as possible (the hour after sunrise or before sunset), so head to the beach for a morning walk or climb the closest mountain as the sun goes down. Avoid the midday sun if possible, unless you want squinty subjects and harsh, dark shadows scattered throughout your snaps.

Use the sun

The sun is your friend — except when it’s not. Lens flare, sun bursts and golden halos are a big no-no. Experiment with shooting away from, and into the sun. Stark silhouettes (when done deliberately) create really powerful images with the sun glaring in front of your subjects whereas, shooting away from the sun will light up faces and bring out the detail in your images.

Look for the action

Put people or animals in your shots where possible to add narrative and character to your images. Look for sports activities, competitions and festivals and catch the fun-in-the-sun action in full swing. Surfers cresting waves, punters dancing in the crowd or even families riding their bikes through the local park all make great shots.

Be prepared

Apart from the essentials (picnic blanket, salt & vinegar chips and an ice-block) make sure you plan for the day ahead. Planning on trying your hand at long exposure? Bring a tripod and a neutral-density (ND) filter to stop that harsh sun from overexposing your soft, marshmallow waves and waterfalls. Heading to a family BBQ? Bring along a remote control for the camera so you can get in behind nana in the inevitable family portrait.

Don’t get weighed down

Travel light. When you’re navigating an amazing bush-walk with the sun bearing down, you don’t want to be carrying packs of lenses, bulky cameras and surplus gear.

Get yourself a compact mirrorless camera, so you can shave off the size/weight without sacrificing image quality. At the end of the day, the best camera is the one you have with you. You don’t need all the gear to snap some spectacular summer shots during 2018 and beyond.

It’s that time of year again, when Kiwis can venture outdoors and hike, cycle, drive or wander their way around this beautiful country. To make the most of your trusty old camera or bright new Christmas plaything here are some tips for capturing sun-drenched views this summer.

There are lots of ways to get great shots this summer, even if the weather doesn’t always play ball. Take your time with shots and don’t use point-and click settings. Many cameras have manual settings so you can take shots like the professionals.

GET UP A LITTLE EARLIER OR STAY OUT A LITTLE LONGER

The best light is as close to the golden hour as possible (the hour after sunrise or before sunset), so head to the beach for a morning walk or climb the closest mountain as the sun goes down. Avoid the midday sun if possible, unless you want squinty subjects and harsh, dark shadows scattered throughout your snaps.

Use the sun

The sun is your friend — except when it’s not. Lens flare, sun bursts and golden halos are a big no-no. Experiment with shooting away from, and into the sun. Stark silhouettes (when done deliberately) create really powerful images with the sun glaring in front of your subjects whereas, shooting away from the sun will light up faces and bring out the detail in your images.

Look for the action

Put people or animals in your shots where possible to add narrative and character to your images. Look for sports activities, competitions and festivals and catch the fun-in-the-sun action in full swing. Surfers cresting waves, punters dancing in the crowd or even families riding their bikes through the local park all make great shots.

Be prepared

Apart from the essentials (picnic blanket, salt & vinegar chips and an ice-block) make sure you plan for the day ahead. Planning on trying your hand at long exposure? Bring a tripod and a neutral-density (ND) filter to stop that harsh sun from overexposing your soft, marshmallow waves and waterfalls. Heading to a family BBQ? Bring along a remote control for the camera so you can get in behind nana in the inevitable family portrait.

Don’t get weighed down

Travel light. When you’re navigating an amazing bush-walk with the sun bearing down, you don’t want to be carrying packs of lenses, bulky cameras and surplus gear.

Get yourself a compact mirrorless camera, so you can shave off the size/weight without sacrificing image quality. At the end of the day, the best camera is the one you have with you. You don’t need all the gear to snap some spectacular summer shots during 2018 and beyond.

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