Aussies behaving well out East

A realm where they can redeem themselves.

A realm where they can redeem themselves.

East’s Outdoor Work & Leisure owners Dean and Teresa Cook with their extensive range of R.M. Williams clothing. Pictures by Liam Clayton
RMW Angus Workshirt teamed with Ramco jeans and a solid hide belt.
The characteristic R.M. Williams longhorn steer emblem appears on all items.
Leather boots are classic RMW attire.
Checked shirts are also classic RMW attire.
Women’s quilted riding vests in navy.

Our neighbours across the Ditch have earned themselves a seriously bad rap in the past couple of weeks but there’s one arena in which they perform with indisputable honour . . . and it also begins with ‘c’. Justine Tyerman investigates . . .

I’m loathe to mention the “c”-word in the Weekender but this week I discovered a realm where the Aussies can redeem themselves and hold their heads high: clothing.

For close to 90 years, Australia has been producing tried and true, honest fair dinkum products under the name of R.M. Williams.

I first came across the range of smart but sturdy Australian-made clothing when I noticed my young friend James sporting some classy jeans and shirts bearing the characteristic R.M. Williams longhorn steer emblem.

I soon discovered James was pretty much a poster boy for the brand from boots to belt to hat to overnight bag and even wallet. He cottoned onto the clothes while working on a cattle ranch in outback Australia and soon adopted the brand as his own.

So when I spotted R.M. Williams at East’s Outdoor Work & Leisure at Makaraka this week, I was intrigued, especially when I discovered there’s a women’s range too.

Store owner Teresa Cook said she began stocking the men’s and women’s clothing brand last winter and has found it extremely popular with Gizzy country folk of all ages.

“It’s such a superb product. I love the merino wool and the quality cotton and linen fabrics R.M. Williams uses,” she says.

Teresa flicks through the impressive 100-page catalogue drooling over the items displayed and explaining how hard it is to decide which products to order.

Rather than narrow it down, she’s opted for a wide range of garments and has racks of jumpers, shirts, sweatshirts, polos, T-shirts, quilted vests, belts, jackets, jeans, hats and boots, all exquisitely made and finished.

“The R.M. Williams look is stylish, timeless and classy but never loud. Sweatshirts and jumpers are classic navy, clay and dark red, shirts come in plains and small and large checks, polos in stripes and boots in black, brown and beige,” says Teresa.

“Jeans feature a variety of styles to suit all tastes — ‘Dusty’ is a slim fit, ‘Linesman’ is a straight leg and ‘Ramco’ a standard leg.”

While the range is mainly smart casual, there are also trendy dress shirts and elegant jackets for formal occasions.

As for womenswear, I loved the quilted navy vests, Liberty print shirts and merino jumpers and ponchos.

Teresa’s autumn and winter stock is still arriving but she’s already looking ahead at next summer’s fashions.

“I have my eye on R.M. Williams’ pin-striped dresses and linen shirts. They’re gorgeous. I can’t wait to see them,” she says.

Our neighbours across the Ditch have earned themselves a seriously bad rap in the past couple of weeks but there’s one arena in which they perform with indisputable honour . . . and it also begins with ‘c’. Justine Tyerman investigates . . .

I’m loathe to mention the “c”-word in the Weekender but this week I discovered a realm where the Aussies can redeem themselves and hold their heads high: clothing.

For close to 90 years, Australia has been producing tried and true, honest fair dinkum products under the name of R.M. Williams.

I first came across the range of smart but sturdy Australian-made clothing when I noticed my young friend James sporting some classy jeans and shirts bearing the characteristic R.M. Williams longhorn steer emblem.

I soon discovered James was pretty much a poster boy for the brand from boots to belt to hat to overnight bag and even wallet. He cottoned onto the clothes while working on a cattle ranch in outback Australia and soon adopted the brand as his own.

So when I spotted R.M. Williams at East’s Outdoor Work & Leisure at Makaraka this week, I was intrigued, especially when I discovered there’s a women’s range too.

Store owner Teresa Cook said she began stocking the men’s and women’s clothing brand last winter and has found it extremely popular with Gizzy country folk of all ages.

“It’s such a superb product. I love the merino wool and the quality cotton and linen fabrics R.M. Williams uses,” she says.

Teresa flicks through the impressive 100-page catalogue drooling over the items displayed and explaining how hard it is to decide which products to order.

Rather than narrow it down, she’s opted for a wide range of garments and has racks of jumpers, shirts, sweatshirts, polos, T-shirts, quilted vests, belts, jackets, jeans, hats and boots, all exquisitely made and finished.

“The R.M. Williams look is stylish, timeless and classy but never loud. Sweatshirts and jumpers are classic navy, clay and dark red, shirts come in plains and small and large checks, polos in stripes and boots in black, brown and beige,” says Teresa.

“Jeans feature a variety of styles to suit all tastes — ‘Dusty’ is a slim fit, ‘Linesman’ is a straight leg and ‘Ramco’ a standard leg.”

While the range is mainly smart casual, there are also trendy dress shirts and elegant jackets for formal occasions.

As for womenswear, I loved the quilted navy vests, Liberty print shirts and merino jumpers and ponchos.

Teresa’s autumn and winter stock is still arriving but she’s already looking ahead at next summer’s fashions.

“I have my eye on R.M. Williams’ pin-striped dresses and linen shirts. They’re gorgeous. I can’t wait to see them,” she says.

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Mike P - 2 months ago
Genuine quality products - wear boots almost daily and have done so for coming-on 8 years. A couple of re-heels but as comfortable as the day I bought them. Overall cost has reduced to approx. $80 per year. Great to have a stockest locally.

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