Carotenoid-rich food  

Squash and pumpkin helps to lower the risk for many cancers.

No single food or food component can protect you against cancer by itself. But research shows that a diet filled with a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans and other plant foods helps lower risk for many cancers. Squash and pumpkin are among them, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) which provides excellent information and delicious recipes on their website.

Winter squash is an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre. It’s also a good way to get potassium.

Winter squash, including pumpkins, are rich in carotenoids, including:

  • Beta-carotene and alpha-carotene — these carotenoids can act as antioxidants.

Also, our bodies convert these to vitamin A, a nutrient important for immune function and maintaining healthy cells among other roles.

  • Lutein and zeaxanthin — these yellow pigmented carotenoids help protect eye health by filtering high-energy ultraviolet rays that can damage our eyes’ lens and retina.

They act as antioxidants here and possibly elsewhere in our bodies.
Local squash are plentiful, sweet and tasty. Enjoy their delicious flavour in this easy-to-make dish. — AICR

Caramelised carrots and orange squash

Ingredients
½ cup raisins
⅔ cup apple juice
1kg carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally into ¼ inch pieces
1 small squash, peeled, and cubed, ½ inch cubes
1 small butternut (about 500 grams), seeds removed, peeled, cubed, ½ inch cubes
3 tbsp light olive oil
2½ tbsp date syrup/honey (or dark honey)
½ tsp ground cinnamon
Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
½ cup apricot halves cut into small pieces

Method

  • Preheat oven to 200C
  • Soak raisins in apple juice.
  • Line large baking sheet with two sheets of parchment paper.
  • In large bowl, mix vegetables, oil, syrup, cinnamon and add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Spread mixture on baking sheet.
  • Bake until carrots (the longest to bake) are just soft then add raisins and apricots. Bake about 10 minutes longer, until carrots are soft enough for fork to prick through.
  • Serve immediately or, if refrigerating for several hours or more, pour ⅓ cup apple juice over vegetables to keep moist before reheating.

Makes 10 servings

No single food or food component can protect you against cancer by itself. But research shows that a diet filled with a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans and other plant foods helps lower risk for many cancers. Squash and pumpkin are among them, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) which provides excellent information and delicious recipes on their website.

Winter squash is an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C and dietary fibre. It’s also a good way to get potassium.

Winter squash, including pumpkins, are rich in carotenoids, including:

  • Beta-carotene and alpha-carotene — these carotenoids can act as antioxidants.

Also, our bodies convert these to vitamin A, a nutrient important for immune function and maintaining healthy cells among other roles.

  • Lutein and zeaxanthin — these yellow pigmented carotenoids help protect eye health by filtering high-energy ultraviolet rays that can damage our eyes’ lens and retina.

They act as antioxidants here and possibly elsewhere in our bodies.
Local squash are plentiful, sweet and tasty. Enjoy their delicious flavour in this easy-to-make dish. — AICR

Caramelised carrots and orange squash

Ingredients
½ cup raisins
⅔ cup apple juice
1kg carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally into ¼ inch pieces
1 small squash, peeled, and cubed, ½ inch cubes
1 small butternut (about 500 grams), seeds removed, peeled, cubed, ½ inch cubes
3 tbsp light olive oil
2½ tbsp date syrup/honey (or dark honey)
½ tsp ground cinnamon
Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
½ cup apricot halves cut into small pieces

Method

  • Preheat oven to 200C
  • Soak raisins in apple juice.
  • Line large baking sheet with two sheets of parchment paper.
  • In large bowl, mix vegetables, oil, syrup, cinnamon and add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Spread mixture on baking sheet.
  • Bake until carrots (the longest to bake) are just soft then add raisins and apricots. Bake about 10 minutes longer, until carrots are soft enough for fork to prick through.
  • Serve immediately or, if refrigerating for several hours or more, pour ⅓ cup apple juice over vegetables to keep moist before reheating.

Makes 10 servings

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