Passionate about Aotearoa surfing

Gisborne man Cory Scott now the owner of leading surf publication.

Gisborne man Cory Scott now the owner of leading surf publication.

RIDING THE WAVE OF SUCCESS: New Zealand Surfing Magazine owner Cory Scott has photographed some of the best surfers in the world such as this shot of an epic wave rider, riding a Tairawhiti wave. Pictures supplied
Cory Scott
Cory Scott
Cory Scott
Cory Scott
Cory Scott
Cory Scott

In more than 20 years, Gisborne man Cory Scott has captured thousands of magic surfing images that have graced the pages of the country’s leading surf publication, and now he is the owner of New Zealand Surfing Magazine. The 44-year-old talked to reporter Murray Robertson about the transition from editor to owner and how he believes the iconic magazine, produced in Gisborne, will move forward from here.

The July-August edition of New Zealand Surfing Magazine was Cory’s first as owner, and after 10 years as editor he said it felt great to have full control.

NZ Surfing Magazine has appeared on the shelves of bookshops throughout the country for 33 years.

“I have tried to take over the ownership reins for the past three years, and in the end the previous owner and I agreed finally on an affordable price.

“Surfing is my love. It’s my passion and working to produce a magazine about surfing keeps me going every day I wake up.

“But I reached a point where if I had not been able to purchase it and take over as owner, I would probably have gone off and done something completely different.”

Cory was born in Dunedin and grew up in South Auckland.

He started riding a surfboard after the family moved to Tauranga when he was 12.
“Before moving to Mount Maunganui I had never seen a wave break. I grew up in a neighbourhood where nobody had ever heard of surfing, let alone practised it.

“But once we got to the Mount, well, surfing became my passion.
“I felt its power and it instantly grabbed me. “

In those early days of his surfing life he discovered NZ Surfing Magazine.
“Back then I couldn’t get enough information on how this lifestyle worked, but I found education in places like the magazine.

“Faces in those early mags became heroes and the waves became want-to-experience locations.”

In the years since, Cory said surfing had become his life.

“From the board shaping bay to sponsoring athletes, from competitive surfing to being the coach of the New Zealand

Team, to photographing the best surfers and waves this country has ever produced . . . and even finding new waves that were never known to exist.”

He has travelled the world to experience iconic surfing destinations and cultures.

“Through all the amazing people I have met along the journey, my life has become richer,” he said in his opening editorial as magazine owner.

“To those who gave me a shot way back in the beginning, who believed in me, and to those many publications and their editors/photo editors throughout the world that nurtured my skill and helped hone my eye.

“It is through all of these pivotal moments that my path now leads me to this opportunity to guide the voice of New Zealand surfing into the future and continue the legacy, for which I am honoured and humbled,” his editorial read.

Cory and wife Sarah’s three boys, Max aged 17, Rico 12 and Cruz 7, have all now taken up surfing.
“Rico and Cruz are right into it now.
“To be honest I have been going for a surf just every now and then for a while now, but the younger boys will get me out there a bit more often.”

He has another major passion — flyfishing.
“I am right into that.”

Cory has won the national championship three times and goes to the world championships every year.

“I didn’t compete too well in Slovakia this year, but next year the champs are in Tasmania, where fishing conditions are more like New Zealand.”

As far as the magazine is concerned, Cory said in this increasingly digital age he feels the place of a printed magazine like his remains sound.

“All I hear is digital this, and digital that, but I feel there is an over-saturation of digital content these days. People still like to read a hard copy magazine and the unique content we capture with New Zealand Surfing is a key selling point for our readers.

“It is so much more visually appealing than anything digital, and trends overseas for a resurgence in print media will get to New Zealand.”’

He intends to continue to provide a vehicle that is the voice of New Zealand surfing.

“I am proud to call this publication ours. A publication that captures the unique culture of surfing in Aotearoa. . . . and it still sells really well on the shelves of New Zealand book shops”.

In more than 20 years, Gisborne man Cory Scott has captured thousands of magic surfing images that have graced the pages of the country’s leading surf publication, and now he is the owner of New Zealand Surfing Magazine. The 44-year-old talked to reporter Murray Robertson about the transition from editor to owner and how he believes the iconic magazine, produced in Gisborne, will move forward from here.

The July-August edition of New Zealand Surfing Magazine was Cory’s first as owner, and after 10 years as editor he said it felt great to have full control.

NZ Surfing Magazine has appeared on the shelves of bookshops throughout the country for 33 years.

“I have tried to take over the ownership reins for the past three years, and in the end the previous owner and I agreed finally on an affordable price.

“Surfing is my love. It’s my passion and working to produce a magazine about surfing keeps me going every day I wake up.

“But I reached a point where if I had not been able to purchase it and take over as owner, I would probably have gone off and done something completely different.”

Cory was born in Dunedin and grew up in South Auckland.

He started riding a surfboard after the family moved to Tauranga when he was 12.
“Before moving to Mount Maunganui I had never seen a wave break. I grew up in a neighbourhood where nobody had ever heard of surfing, let alone practised it.

“But once we got to the Mount, well, surfing became my passion.
“I felt its power and it instantly grabbed me. “

In those early days of his surfing life he discovered NZ Surfing Magazine.
“Back then I couldn’t get enough information on how this lifestyle worked, but I found education in places like the magazine.

“Faces in those early mags became heroes and the waves became want-to-experience locations.”

In the years since, Cory said surfing had become his life.

“From the board shaping bay to sponsoring athletes, from competitive surfing to being the coach of the New Zealand

Team, to photographing the best surfers and waves this country has ever produced . . . and even finding new waves that were never known to exist.”

He has travelled the world to experience iconic surfing destinations and cultures.

“Through all the amazing people I have met along the journey, my life has become richer,” he said in his opening editorial as magazine owner.

“To those who gave me a shot way back in the beginning, who believed in me, and to those many publications and their editors/photo editors throughout the world that nurtured my skill and helped hone my eye.

“It is through all of these pivotal moments that my path now leads me to this opportunity to guide the voice of New Zealand surfing into the future and continue the legacy, for which I am honoured and humbled,” his editorial read.

Cory and wife Sarah’s three boys, Max aged 17, Rico 12 and Cruz 7, have all now taken up surfing.
“Rico and Cruz are right into it now.
“To be honest I have been going for a surf just every now and then for a while now, but the younger boys will get me out there a bit more often.”

He has another major passion — flyfishing.
“I am right into that.”

Cory has won the national championship three times and goes to the world championships every year.

“I didn’t compete too well in Slovakia this year, but next year the champs are in Tasmania, where fishing conditions are more like New Zealand.”

As far as the magazine is concerned, Cory said in this increasingly digital age he feels the place of a printed magazine like his remains sound.

“All I hear is digital this, and digital that, but I feel there is an over-saturation of digital content these days. People still like to read a hard copy magazine and the unique content we capture with New Zealand Surfing is a key selling point for our readers.

“It is so much more visually appealing than anything digital, and trends overseas for a resurgence in print media will get to New Zealand.”’

He intends to continue to provide a vehicle that is the voice of New Zealand surfing.

“I am proud to call this publication ours. A publication that captures the unique culture of surfing in Aotearoa. . . . and it still sells really well on the shelves of New Zealand book shops”.

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