Where the magic happens

A celebration of creativity.

A celebration of creativity.

Men have their ‘man caves’ and now there’s the ‘she shed’ — a space where women artists work on their creative projects. This year’s She Shed tour includes eight sheds in Wainui, Okitu and Makorori. Pictured here is potter and felt artist, Helen Hovell’s She Shed. Art works can be purchased on the day and refreshments are also available. Pictures by Rhonda McKnight
Painter Margaret Hansen’s studio overlooking Makorori.
A mosaic by Cheryl Scott.
Helen Hovell’s totem pole faces.
A pottery face by Peggy Ericson.
Cheryl Scott at work on one of her mosaic creations.
A pohutukawa quilt by textile artist Bronwyn Furlan.

Cheryl Scott, the mosaic lady of Wainui, Gisborne, and a group of her artistic neighbours have started something special in Gisborne. Kim Parkinson talks to Cheryl about the upcoming She Shed Tour and the artists involved.

A She Shed Tour of eight studios and creative spaces in Gisborne has gained momentum and this year’s tour on November 17 promises to be bigger and better than ever.

“It is becoming a real event here — people absolutely love it,” says organiser Cheryl Scott.

This year 13 new artists are joining the tour. They will display their art in the gardens of the eight hosts who are working on new themes of art.

So although there will be some similar art to previous years, Cheryl promises lots of new things to tempt and inspire tour-goers. This is the fourth year the event has run.

“It’s a very sociable event — people bump into friends they haven’t seen for ages and it’s a great chance to get started on Christmas shopping too.

“There is a real festivity and buzz on the day.”

It all started around Cheryl’s dinner table one night with a group of neighbours with arty hobbies commenting on all the great creative women with art studios in the vicinity.

That conversation led to the creation of a coffee table book displaying each artist’s wares and the spaces in which they created them and the idea of a She Shed Tour was born.

From painting and pottery to mosaics and sculpture, the She Shed Tour can begin at any of the eight studio spaces. Cheryl’s She Shed is a large airy space, nestled into a tropical garden bursting with colour and featuring the artist’s mosaic creations. Other Gisborne artists display their work on large tables throughout the garden and the Curbside Cafe coffee truck will be there to offer refreshments.

Each of the other seven She Sheds on the tour open their creative spaces and gardens to the public and display the work of other Gisborne artists.
“It’s a great day out and people rave about it for weeks afterwards. It could become a drawcard to our region and people can make a weekend of it. It has so much potential,” she says.

Cheryl’s enthusiasm is infectious and her sun-filled studio with a collection of antique crockery is where the magic happens.

She gets so engrossed in her craft that she can lose herself for hours at a time while caught up in the creative process.
“It’s very mindful and therapeutic,” she says.

Cheryl is on a first-name basis with all the second-hand shops around town and further afield.
“People are so generous — I often get home after work to find packages on my doorstep filled with china and old pottery.”

She also runs mosaic workshops called Art and Tarts, with lunch and coffee part of the package.
“This is great for people looking for a creative outlet and they go home with a mosaic artwork.”

The She Sheders have made a few improvements to the event this year with flags being flown and blackboards listing the contributing artists positioned at each venue. All money raised will go the Gisborne East Coast Cancer Society.

Comments from the She Shed hosts:

Margaret Hansen:

“It’s fabulous to have a community you can talk art with and I love the diversity of the practices — we have potters and mosaics, fabric artists and painters. We have this wonderful creativity in common.
“It always surprises me that what I have seen and captured out of my processes touches somebody else. That’s the happy place.”

Holly Howman-Evans:
“It is like a great big happy party with people moving in and out all through the day.
“I paint now for the pure pleasure of it but when someone connects and wants to spend their precious money on one of my paintings, that is enormous for me.”

Jane Putnam:
“I’ve been able to use the skills I ‘ve used in furniture-making to express myself through more creative things you can do with wood. Quite often the ideas come from offcuts of wood.
“I love people coming into my space. I love the opportunity to try out ideas and see a reaction immediately.”

Peggy Ericson:
“I love the process of potting because I don’t really have to think about it too much — it just flows. You can get lost in it . . . lost in the clay. You’re creating something out of the earth and then firing it — it’s the fire, the earth. I love those natural elements.”

Helen Hovell:
“I think people like seeing all the different types of art and wandering around the gardens. I’ve got people coming from all over for this year’s She Shed — from Auckland and Nelson. We’re getting the word out.
With my pottery I usually have something in my head and like seeing it come to life. I love building things — mucking with clay and seeing what will come out of it.”

Morva Thomson:
“I share my space with Irene Smith. We’ve always worked together on the She Shed Tour. I love meeting the people (who come through) and encouraging them — people will say ‘I have a little space but didn’t think of using it like this’. I like to experiment. I have an embroidery background and joined the Embroidery Guild when I lived in Auckland. When I moved back to Gisborne, I joined an embroidery group here and a quilting group and started to go to conferences and do workshops with overseas tutors — a whole world opened up.”

Bronwyn Furlan:
“My studio is quite a personal space for me, and it amazes me that so many people want to see it.
“I have been making stuff most of my life and more and more get pleasure out of other people liking what I do with fabric.
“I have been busy creating a range of machine-embroidered and applique cushions for the She Shed Tour.”

Additional artists:
Bird of Prey (Amanda May), Amie Coker, Annie Wilson, Fiona Shepherd, Helena Anderson, Holly Thomas, Irene Smith, Jo Tito, Julia Gould, Lanie Wilton, Larissa Mahns, Lynda Browdie, Ngaire Leighton, Ngaire Tanner, Phoebe Gander, Susanna Lawrence, Teri Wilkinson, Wendy Baxter, Yvette Van Rader, Maxine Francois, Colleen Robinson.

Cheryl Scott, the mosaic lady of Wainui, Gisborne, and a group of her artistic neighbours have started something special in Gisborne. Kim Parkinson talks to Cheryl about the upcoming She Shed Tour and the artists involved.

A She Shed Tour of eight studios and creative spaces in Gisborne has gained momentum and this year’s tour on November 17 promises to be bigger and better than ever.

“It is becoming a real event here — people absolutely love it,” says organiser Cheryl Scott.

This year 13 new artists are joining the tour. They will display their art in the gardens of the eight hosts who are working on new themes of art.

So although there will be some similar art to previous years, Cheryl promises lots of new things to tempt and inspire tour-goers. This is the fourth year the event has run.

“It’s a very sociable event — people bump into friends they haven’t seen for ages and it’s a great chance to get started on Christmas shopping too.

“There is a real festivity and buzz on the day.”

It all started around Cheryl’s dinner table one night with a group of neighbours with arty hobbies commenting on all the great creative women with art studios in the vicinity.

That conversation led to the creation of a coffee table book displaying each artist’s wares and the spaces in which they created them and the idea of a She Shed Tour was born.

From painting and pottery to mosaics and sculpture, the She Shed Tour can begin at any of the eight studio spaces. Cheryl’s She Shed is a large airy space, nestled into a tropical garden bursting with colour and featuring the artist’s mosaic creations. Other Gisborne artists display their work on large tables throughout the garden and the Curbside Cafe coffee truck will be there to offer refreshments.

Each of the other seven She Sheds on the tour open their creative spaces and gardens to the public and display the work of other Gisborne artists.
“It’s a great day out and people rave about it for weeks afterwards. It could become a drawcard to our region and people can make a weekend of it. It has so much potential,” she says.

Cheryl’s enthusiasm is infectious and her sun-filled studio with a collection of antique crockery is where the magic happens.

She gets so engrossed in her craft that she can lose herself for hours at a time while caught up in the creative process.
“It’s very mindful and therapeutic,” she says.

Cheryl is on a first-name basis with all the second-hand shops around town and further afield.
“People are so generous — I often get home after work to find packages on my doorstep filled with china and old pottery.”

She also runs mosaic workshops called Art and Tarts, with lunch and coffee part of the package.
“This is great for people looking for a creative outlet and they go home with a mosaic artwork.”

The She Sheders have made a few improvements to the event this year with flags being flown and blackboards listing the contributing artists positioned at each venue. All money raised will go the Gisborne East Coast Cancer Society.

Comments from the She Shed hosts:

Margaret Hansen:

“It’s fabulous to have a community you can talk art with and I love the diversity of the practices — we have potters and mosaics, fabric artists and painters. We have this wonderful creativity in common.
“It always surprises me that what I have seen and captured out of my processes touches somebody else. That’s the happy place.”

Holly Howman-Evans:
“It is like a great big happy party with people moving in and out all through the day.
“I paint now for the pure pleasure of it but when someone connects and wants to spend their precious money on one of my paintings, that is enormous for me.”

Jane Putnam:
“I’ve been able to use the skills I ‘ve used in furniture-making to express myself through more creative things you can do with wood. Quite often the ideas come from offcuts of wood.
“I love people coming into my space. I love the opportunity to try out ideas and see a reaction immediately.”

Peggy Ericson:
“I love the process of potting because I don’t really have to think about it too much — it just flows. You can get lost in it . . . lost in the clay. You’re creating something out of the earth and then firing it — it’s the fire, the earth. I love those natural elements.”

Helen Hovell:
“I think people like seeing all the different types of art and wandering around the gardens. I’ve got people coming from all over for this year’s She Shed — from Auckland and Nelson. We’re getting the word out.
With my pottery I usually have something in my head and like seeing it come to life. I love building things — mucking with clay and seeing what will come out of it.”

Morva Thomson:
“I share my space with Irene Smith. We’ve always worked together on the She Shed Tour. I love meeting the people (who come through) and encouraging them — people will say ‘I have a little space but didn’t think of using it like this’. I like to experiment. I have an embroidery background and joined the Embroidery Guild when I lived in Auckland. When I moved back to Gisborne, I joined an embroidery group here and a quilting group and started to go to conferences and do workshops with overseas tutors — a whole world opened up.”

Bronwyn Furlan:
“My studio is quite a personal space for me, and it amazes me that so many people want to see it.
“I have been making stuff most of my life and more and more get pleasure out of other people liking what I do with fabric.
“I have been busy creating a range of machine-embroidered and applique cushions for the She Shed Tour.”

Additional artists:
Bird of Prey (Amanda May), Amie Coker, Annie Wilson, Fiona Shepherd, Helena Anderson, Holly Thomas, Irene Smith, Jo Tito, Julia Gould, Lanie Wilton, Larissa Mahns, Lynda Browdie, Ngaire Leighton, Ngaire Tanner, Phoebe Gander, Susanna Lawrence, Teri Wilkinson, Wendy Baxter, Yvette Van Rader, Maxine Francois, Colleen Robinson.

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