TU TANE

KI RUNGA: (going up) Recently-named head boy and national crossfit title holder Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont warms up with an easy 75kg clean and snatch at the 4010 crossfit gym amid a busy final exams period. Picture by Liam Clayton
KAEA: (to lead) Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont leads a fierce haka from Turanga Wahine Turanga Tane kapa haka roopu (group). The 17-year-old has just been named head boy at Gisborne Boys’ High School. Picture by Darryl Crawford

Reporter Maika Akroyd catches up with Gisborne Boys’ High Schools 2020 head boy Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont and soon finds that the school isn’t just getting a new leader, but an accomplished sportsperson and orator as well . . .

Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont has just been named head boy of Gisborne Boys’ High School for 2020. Having received schooling from Te kura kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui in his primary and intermediate years, Tuteari is fluent in te reo Maori and also became the Kaitataki tane (male lead) for the high school kapa haka group, Turanga Wahine Turanga Tane.

“It was quite overwhelming coming from kura kaupapa to mainstream,” he said.
“There were a lot of challenges making the transition, moving to a larger school with a bigger population of students, also learning to develop my English,” he said.

In 2017 and last year, Tuteari competed at the international crossfit games (high-intensity fitness programme) and placed 10th and 11th in his age group out of about 2000 hopeful contestants.

He credits his friend Kitini Taihuka for encouraging him to go along to crossfit sessions when they were about 12 years old and said he initially saw it as a way to improve in his rugby.
Just this year he competed at the three main National weight lifting competitions.

He placed first in the Under 73kg Secondary Schools competition, first in the junior section (Under 21) and third in the open men’s grade at the North Island competition.
He also placed first in the junior section and second in the open men’s section at the nationals.

With so much on his plate already and a passion to improve on his rugby as a current member of Gisborne Boys’ High School 1st XV, Tuteari was honest and said the role as head boy had never been an aspiration of his.

He said one quote that has resonated with him was: “Leaders are not defined by their titles, but by their actions that inspire others.”
However, he sees the “great group of prefects” around him as an “exciting” opportunity to make a difference at the school.

Tuteari’s favourite subjects at school are mathematics, business studies, physical education and te reo Maori.

In a step of confidence he took to the stage for the first time in the Nga Manu Korero (NMK) regional speech competition earlier this year and placed third overall in the senior te reo section.

As a young man from Te Whanau a Kai, Te Aitanga a Mahaki, Ngati Porou, who also has affiliations to Rongowhakaata, Te Whanau-a-Apanui and Tuhou, the orator got to stand proudly on the stage in Ruatoria and korero about “te mana o te reo” in front of his whanau.
“Ehara noku toku reo, ehara hoki nou tou reo, engari no te reo ke tatou,” he said.
“This language does not belong to me, it does not belong to you, but it is ours. There is beauty in the essence and eternal value of the language alone.”

Maori teacher at Boys’ High, Ryan Tapsell, applauded Tuteari for being an “outstanding leader” who carries himself with “the highest quality at all times”.
“He is trustworthy and humble and the work he puts in behind the scenes is immense,” Matua (Mr) Tapsell said.
“Anyone outside his many undertakings would not be aware of everything he does because he doesn’t look for credit — what he does is just a part of his responsibilities.”

Looking beyond school, Tuteari is hopeful that his rugby, weightlifting and crossfit will bring opportunities his way.
“I’d like to go to the Olympics for weightlifting and become a professional rugby player and crossfitter,” Tuteari said.
“I know there has to be a plan B and plan C in place, so I’ll keep striving in what I am passionate about which is te reo Maori, physical health and business while I still figure out my university ambitions.”

He is looking forward to kapa haka and crossfit nationals next year as well as travelling away for GBHS first XV rugby games.

Tuteari would like to acknowledge all of the people who have made an impact on his life so far.
“I look forward to 2020 with a great team of young men who are great role models for our school peers.

“Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi he toa takitini — This success does not come from me alone, but comes from the collective.”

Reporter Maika Akroyd catches up with Gisborne Boys’ High Schools 2020 head boy Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont and soon finds that the school isn’t just getting a new leader, but an accomplished sportsperson and orator as well . . .

Tuteari Te Rauna-Lamont has just been named head boy of Gisborne Boys’ High School for 2020. Having received schooling from Te kura kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui in his primary and intermediate years, Tuteari is fluent in te reo Maori and also became the Kaitataki tane (male lead) for the high school kapa haka group, Turanga Wahine Turanga Tane.

“It was quite overwhelming coming from kura kaupapa to mainstream,” he said.
“There were a lot of challenges making the transition, moving to a larger school with a bigger population of students, also learning to develop my English,” he said.

In 2017 and last year, Tuteari competed at the international crossfit games (high-intensity fitness programme) and placed 10th and 11th in his age group out of about 2000 hopeful contestants.

He credits his friend Kitini Taihuka for encouraging him to go along to crossfit sessions when they were about 12 years old and said he initially saw it as a way to improve in his rugby.
Just this year he competed at the three main National weight lifting competitions.

He placed first in the Under 73kg Secondary Schools competition, first in the junior section (Under 21) and third in the open men’s grade at the North Island competition.
He also placed first in the junior section and second in the open men’s section at the nationals.

With so much on his plate already and a passion to improve on his rugby as a current member of Gisborne Boys’ High School 1st XV, Tuteari was honest and said the role as head boy had never been an aspiration of his.

He said one quote that has resonated with him was: “Leaders are not defined by their titles, but by their actions that inspire others.”
However, he sees the “great group of prefects” around him as an “exciting” opportunity to make a difference at the school.

Tuteari’s favourite subjects at school are mathematics, business studies, physical education and te reo Maori.

In a step of confidence he took to the stage for the first time in the Nga Manu Korero (NMK) regional speech competition earlier this year and placed third overall in the senior te reo section.

As a young man from Te Whanau a Kai, Te Aitanga a Mahaki, Ngati Porou, who also has affiliations to Rongowhakaata, Te Whanau-a-Apanui and Tuhou, the orator got to stand proudly on the stage in Ruatoria and korero about “te mana o te reo” in front of his whanau.
“Ehara noku toku reo, ehara hoki nou tou reo, engari no te reo ke tatou,” he said.
“This language does not belong to me, it does not belong to you, but it is ours. There is beauty in the essence and eternal value of the language alone.”

Maori teacher at Boys’ High, Ryan Tapsell, applauded Tuteari for being an “outstanding leader” who carries himself with “the highest quality at all times”.
“He is trustworthy and humble and the work he puts in behind the scenes is immense,” Matua (Mr) Tapsell said.
“Anyone outside his many undertakings would not be aware of everything he does because he doesn’t look for credit — what he does is just a part of his responsibilities.”

Looking beyond school, Tuteari is hopeful that his rugby, weightlifting and crossfit will bring opportunities his way.
“I’d like to go to the Olympics for weightlifting and become a professional rugby player and crossfitter,” Tuteari said.
“I know there has to be a plan B and plan C in place, so I’ll keep striving in what I am passionate about which is te reo Maori, physical health and business while I still figure out my university ambitions.”

He is looking forward to kapa haka and crossfit nationals next year as well as travelling away for GBHS first XV rugby games.

Tuteari would like to acknowledge all of the people who have made an impact on his life so far.
“I look forward to 2020 with a great team of young men who are great role models for our school peers.

“Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi he toa takitini — This success does not come from me alone, but comes from the collective.”

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