Twenty vintage bulldozers steam into a shed

Two Gisborne men create dozer heaven

Two Gisborne men create dozer heaven

Drummond Vintage Dozers - Sheldon Drummond, Danny Drummond, with friend Vance
Drummond Vintage Dozers -
Drummond Vintage Dozers - Vance, Sheldon Drummond, Danny Drummond
Drummond Vintage Dozers - Danny Drummond, Vance, Sheldon Drummond
Drummond Vintage Dozers -

SOME people collect stamps, some people collect coins. Gisborne men Sheldon and Danny Drummond collect bulldozers.

The father and son between them have more than 20 vintage bulldozers they have saved from the scrap heap to return to working order. Some of the earthmovers date back almost 100 years, with their earliest model from 1928.

They collect the vintage dozers through Trade Me and other online networks. They are not cheap to buy and doing them up can cost even more.

For example, there is a D5 bulldozer for sale at US$25,000. There were only 39 made in the world, so their rarity ups the price. It’s one that Sheldon and Danny will wait to buy when the price is right.

“You can spend a lot of dollars on these,” says Sheldon with a laugh.

But the bluntness belies the enjoyment and fun these guys get from saving the humble earthmovers from fading away into obscurity. There is not much the dedicated duo would not do to save one.

Sheldon says they have “rust disease”. Tractors feature too.

There is an old 1940s tractor out the back of Motu that has been slowly done up over the years and was recently driven 22 kilometres out of the bush until it reached a spot where a truck could pick it up.

It’s slow but fun work, says Sheldon.

The old machinery has a worldwide market and can fetch thousands of dollars once restored.

“It’s like art,” says Sheldon.

“A vintage collection goes up and up in value.”

But that’s not why they do it.

Many of the bulldozers are rusting away, with some of the steel already sold off for scrap. If it were not for their time and effort and that of other enthusiasts, many of these machines and their history would be lost forever.

Many parts are not sold in New Zealand, so they either have to be shipped from overseas or made especially. Mechanic Vance Hills helps Sheldon and Danny work on the machines. The work can be frustrating, he says, because of the lack of parts. But it is all worth it in the end.

For Danny, bulldozers have been a part of his life for as long as he can remember. One of the latest in the collection is a 1938 baby bulldozer, which Danny has wanted for a long time.

Then there’s the 1947 bulldozer he remembers riding on as a kid when his Dad borrowed one to do up their driveway.

• The bulldozers get fired up and used for special events. Sheldon and his best men arrived on them for Sheldon’s wedding last year.

SOME people collect stamps, some people collect coins. Gisborne men Sheldon and Danny Drummond collect bulldozers.

The father and son between them have more than 20 vintage bulldozers they have saved from the scrap heap to return to working order. Some of the earthmovers date back almost 100 years, with their earliest model from 1928.

They collect the vintage dozers through Trade Me and other online networks. They are not cheap to buy and doing them up can cost even more.

For example, there is a D5 bulldozer for sale at US$25,000. There were only 39 made in the world, so their rarity ups the price. It’s one that Sheldon and Danny will wait to buy when the price is right.

“You can spend a lot of dollars on these,” says Sheldon with a laugh.

But the bluntness belies the enjoyment and fun these guys get from saving the humble earthmovers from fading away into obscurity. There is not much the dedicated duo would not do to save one.

Sheldon says they have “rust disease”. Tractors feature too.

There is an old 1940s tractor out the back of Motu that has been slowly done up over the years and was recently driven 22 kilometres out of the bush until it reached a spot where a truck could pick it up.

It’s slow but fun work, says Sheldon.

The old machinery has a worldwide market and can fetch thousands of dollars once restored.

“It’s like art,” says Sheldon.

“A vintage collection goes up and up in value.”

But that’s not why they do it.

Many of the bulldozers are rusting away, with some of the steel already sold off for scrap. If it were not for their time and effort and that of other enthusiasts, many of these machines and their history would be lost forever.

Many parts are not sold in New Zealand, so they either have to be shipped from overseas or made especially. Mechanic Vance Hills helps Sheldon and Danny work on the machines. The work can be frustrating, he says, because of the lack of parts. But it is all worth it in the end.

For Danny, bulldozers have been a part of his life for as long as he can remember. One of the latest in the collection is a 1938 baby bulldozer, which Danny has wanted for a long time.

Then there’s the 1947 bulldozer he remembers riding on as a kid when his Dad borrowed one to do up their driveway.

• The bulldozers get fired up and used for special events. Sheldon and his best men arrived on them for Sheldon’s wedding last year.

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