Computers in Homes success recognised at TeachXpo dinner

The region’s positive attitude to education was aknowledged at the TeachXpo 2015 dinner last night.

The region’s positive attitude to education was aknowledged at the TeachXpo 2015 dinner last night.

CAREER KICKSTARTER: Karen Sadlier, her husband Walton and Maori Party co-leader and TeachXpo dinner guest speaker Marama Fox celebrate Mrs Sadlier’s Computers in Homes Success Award last night. She was one of the first to complete the programme in 2005 and it led her into teaching as a career.

KEYNOTE speakers, workshop leaders, Ministry of Education employees, teachers and a politician gathered for a meal to celebrate the conference.

Organiser Maurice Alford opened the evening with a speech thanking all those attending.

“TeachXpo was about making things accessible. Sending staff away to upskill is expensive — you have to cover travel, food and accommodation costs. So we thought OK, let’s bring the speakers here.

“We have had people come from all over the country and from outside the country too. It has been fantastic to see.”

Eastland Community Trust CEO Leighton Evans addressed the dinner, revealing plans for a new education initiative in the making, to be revealed soon.

Keynote speaker for the conference and Maori Party co-leader Marama Fox, also spoke.

“We all have a Johnny in our class — the kid you get to fix the computer when something goes wrong. It used to be we had to keep up with Johnny, but now with technology Johnny is way past us and we have got to keep up again,” she said.

She commended the region’s positive attitude towards furthering education and took time to introduce Karen Sadlier, a recipient of a Computers in Homes Success Award.

Mrs Sadlier, parent of five, was one of the first to complete the programme in 2005. At the time she was a homework supervisor at Awapuni School.

The programme gave her the confidence and the courage to go further and, with the support of her colleagues at Awapuni, she began studying teaching.

After four years studying part- time while raising her children, she graduated from the University of Canterbury College of Education.

Teaching career starts

In 2010, she was appointed to a teaching position at Sonrise Christian School in Gisborne, where she teaches today.

The Computers in Homes website will feature a success wall of fame, where Mrs Sadlier’s story will be shared.

The 2013 Census revealed that there were 1407 households with school-aged children in the Gisborne District without access to the internet in their homes — 30 percent of households with school-aged children in the region without internet, compared to the national average of 15 percent.

The 2020 Communications Trust Computers in Homes initiative sees parents throughout New Zealand take part in a comprehensive computer literacy course.

At the end of the course they get to take a computer home and receive an internet connection, subsidised for a year.

Since 2007, more than 1600 families from nearly all of the district’s schools have taken part in the initiative.

During the Chorus Gigatown competition, the region’s business proposal included the vision of supporting 1000 more Computers in Homes families over the next three years.

Despite losing out in the Gigatown final, the team behind the bid is continuing to pursue the vision for a digitally-connected and engaged community.

A funding proposal to increase Computers in Homes in the Gisborne district is being developed to present to the Eastland Community Trust later this year.

A further 50 Computers in Homes families will be supported from 2015 to 2016 from the national total of 1500 announced earlier this year by Ministers Hekia Parata and Nikki Kaye.

There are 10 spots left. Forty families from Awapuni School, Hatea-a-Rangi and Tolaga Bay Area School have already registered.

KEYNOTE speakers, workshop leaders, Ministry of Education employees, teachers and a politician gathered for a meal to celebrate the conference.

Organiser Maurice Alford opened the evening with a speech thanking all those attending.

“TeachXpo was about making things accessible. Sending staff away to upskill is expensive — you have to cover travel, food and accommodation costs. So we thought OK, let’s bring the speakers here.

“We have had people come from all over the country and from outside the country too. It has been fantastic to see.”

Eastland Community Trust CEO Leighton Evans addressed the dinner, revealing plans for a new education initiative in the making, to be revealed soon.

Keynote speaker for the conference and Maori Party co-leader Marama Fox, also spoke.

“We all have a Johnny in our class — the kid you get to fix the computer when something goes wrong. It used to be we had to keep up with Johnny, but now with technology Johnny is way past us and we have got to keep up again,” she said.

She commended the region’s positive attitude towards furthering education and took time to introduce Karen Sadlier, a recipient of a Computers in Homes Success Award.

Mrs Sadlier, parent of five, was one of the first to complete the programme in 2005. At the time she was a homework supervisor at Awapuni School.

The programme gave her the confidence and the courage to go further and, with the support of her colleagues at Awapuni, she began studying teaching.

After four years studying part- time while raising her children, she graduated from the University of Canterbury College of Education.

Teaching career starts

In 2010, she was appointed to a teaching position at Sonrise Christian School in Gisborne, where she teaches today.

The Computers in Homes website will feature a success wall of fame, where Mrs Sadlier’s story will be shared.

The 2013 Census revealed that there were 1407 households with school-aged children in the Gisborne District without access to the internet in their homes — 30 percent of households with school-aged children in the region without internet, compared to the national average of 15 percent.

The 2020 Communications Trust Computers in Homes initiative sees parents throughout New Zealand take part in a comprehensive computer literacy course.

At the end of the course they get to take a computer home and receive an internet connection, subsidised for a year.

Since 2007, more than 1600 families from nearly all of the district’s schools have taken part in the initiative.

During the Chorus Gigatown competition, the region’s business proposal included the vision of supporting 1000 more Computers in Homes families over the next three years.

Despite losing out in the Gigatown final, the team behind the bid is continuing to pursue the vision for a digitally-connected and engaged community.

A funding proposal to increase Computers in Homes in the Gisborne district is being developed to present to the Eastland Community Trust later this year.

A further 50 Computers in Homes families will be supported from 2015 to 2016 from the national total of 1500 announced earlier this year by Ministers Hekia Parata and Nikki Kaye.

There are 10 spots left. Forty families from Awapuni School, Hatea-a-Rangi and Tolaga Bay Area School have already registered.

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