Improving hazard information

A new website is helping east coast residents prepare, and if necessary, respond.

A new website is helping east coast residents prepare, and if necessary, respond.

A NEW national umbrella group aiming to prepare east coast residents to better deal with associated risks from earthquakes and tsunami in the region has set up a website to better inform the public.

The East Coast LAB (Life At the Boundary) umbrella group was set up to make sure cutting-edge research on the Hikurangi tectonic boundary, which runs the length of the east coast of the North Island, is accessible to residents.

It has launched a new website to improve the resilience of communities on the east coast to natural hazards associated with the plate boundary.

The core members of East Coast LAB are GNS Science, the Natural Hazards Research Platform, EQC (Earthquake Commission), Massey University, Niwa, the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, the regional councils and civil defence emergency management groups from Hawke’s Bay, Gisborne, Wellington, Manawatu-Whanganui and Napier City councils, and the National Aquarium of New Zealand.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence emergency management co-ordinator Lisa Pearce said the project had brought together scientists, emergency managers, experts and stakeholders from across the East Coast and around the world.

“East Coast LAB (Life at the Boundary) is a joint project aimed at fostering new research to increase the understanding of the plate boundary and associated natural hazards at the same time as encouraging the public to become engaged in science so they understand the risks of living at the boundary.

“The launch of the East Coast LAB website (www.eastcoastlab.org.nz) is the first step towards introducing the project to the public. It will provide information on the initiative, which will be officially launched later next year.”

Knowing how to prepare and respond

The project aimed to ensure people were aware of the hazards that affected them, and knew how to prepare and respond to natural hazard events.

Natural Hazards Research Platform Consortium ECLAB steering group member Hannah Brackley said the Hawke’s Bay-based initiative included representatives from East Cape to Wellington.

“The project has really been in development for about the last 12 months and now we a giving it a bit more of a public face.

In terms of the purpose of the whole initiative, it is about maximising the huge amount of both New Zealand and international research on the Hikurangi subduction margin. This is making that research accessible and applicable to the east coast communities.”

Dr Brackley said making that research usable and understandable would help educate communities about hazards related to the subduction zone.

A NEW national umbrella group aiming to prepare east coast residents to better deal with associated risks from earthquakes and tsunami in the region has set up a website to better inform the public.

The East Coast LAB (Life At the Boundary) umbrella group was set up to make sure cutting-edge research on the Hikurangi tectonic boundary, which runs the length of the east coast of the North Island, is accessible to residents.

It has launched a new website to improve the resilience of communities on the east coast to natural hazards associated with the plate boundary.

The core members of East Coast LAB are GNS Science, the Natural Hazards Research Platform, EQC (Earthquake Commission), Massey University, Niwa, the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, the regional councils and civil defence emergency management groups from Hawke’s Bay, Gisborne, Wellington, Manawatu-Whanganui and Napier City councils, and the National Aquarium of New Zealand.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence emergency management co-ordinator Lisa Pearce said the project had brought together scientists, emergency managers, experts and stakeholders from across the East Coast and around the world.

“East Coast LAB (Life at the Boundary) is a joint project aimed at fostering new research to increase the understanding of the plate boundary and associated natural hazards at the same time as encouraging the public to become engaged in science so they understand the risks of living at the boundary.

“The launch of the East Coast LAB website (www.eastcoastlab.org.nz) is the first step towards introducing the project to the public. It will provide information on the initiative, which will be officially launched later next year.”

Knowing how to prepare and respond

The project aimed to ensure people were aware of the hazards that affected them, and knew how to prepare and respond to natural hazard events.

Natural Hazards Research Platform Consortium ECLAB steering group member Hannah Brackley said the Hawke’s Bay-based initiative included representatives from East Cape to Wellington.

“The project has really been in development for about the last 12 months and now we a giving it a bit more of a public face.

In terms of the purpose of the whole initiative, it is about maximising the huge amount of both New Zealand and international research on the Hikurangi subduction margin. This is making that research accessible and applicable to the east coast communities.”

Dr Brackley said making that research usable and understandable would help educate communities about hazards related to the subduction zone.

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