Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti calls for regional approach

Sporting body says a funding cut is an opportunity for the region to work smarter for better results.

Sporting body says a funding cut is an opportunity for the region to work smarter for better results.

Tryn Lolohea, left, and Gisborne Girls’ High School’s Rochea Moeke battle for possession during a six-a-side footballl match. Picture by Paul Rickard

A SMALL cut in Sport New Zealand funding for Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti, already the country’s lowest funded regional sports trust, could provide a push for groups across the region to come together.

Following the introduction of a new contestable funding structure for Regional Sports Trusts, Sport NZ announced it would provide $1.62 million to this region’s RST over a four-year period.

Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti chief executive Brent Sheldrake said he viewed the funding announcement as a “glass half-full” situation.

“Yes there has been a cut, however I don’t think it’s too big a hurdle for us to overcome. I can’t see it affecting immediate programmes and priorities, but the message for me is it gives us even more reason to come together as a region and through strategic connection and alignment we can collectively create more positive outcomes for our community.

“Sport and recreation is an awesome vehicle to drive community development and there is a real conversation to be continued with other key enablers about coming together in providing a better future of our families and whanau through sport”.

Sport NZ will provide $405,000 a year in funding, $30,000 of which will be used for initiatives that specifically target Maori participation in sport.

Mr Sheldrake said that was a new concept from previous years and Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti representatives would attend a meeting in Wellington this week to learn more about the specifics surrounding what that investment could be used for.

Funding was distributed on a population-based approach, which should provide further impetus for a coordinated regional approach.

“As a community, we face a number of challenges and the population-based model does not always help in addressing those challenges, especially when there is significant evidence of need.”

Sport NZ community sport general manager Geoff Barry said yesterday’s announcement reflected an investment of $25.4 million a year in Regional Sports Trusts (RSTs) and National Sports Organisations (NSOs).

Mr Barry said investment into the network of RSTs had been preserved, because of their key role in leading local and regional delivery systems.

$18.1 million per annum would also be invested into initiatives that have an impact on the strategy’s focus areas of young people, local delivery (particularly in low participation communities) and competitive sport.

“This includes specific investment in coaching, talent development, targeted Auckland initiatives and Maori participation.”

A SMALL cut in Sport New Zealand funding for Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti, already the country’s lowest funded regional sports trust, could provide a push for groups across the region to come together.

Following the introduction of a new contestable funding structure for Regional Sports Trusts, Sport NZ announced it would provide $1.62 million to this region’s RST over a four-year period.

Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti chief executive Brent Sheldrake said he viewed the funding announcement as a “glass half-full” situation.

“Yes there has been a cut, however I don’t think it’s too big a hurdle for us to overcome. I can’t see it affecting immediate programmes and priorities, but the message for me is it gives us even more reason to come together as a region and through strategic connection and alignment we can collectively create more positive outcomes for our community.

“Sport and recreation is an awesome vehicle to drive community development and there is a real conversation to be continued with other key enablers about coming together in providing a better future of our families and whanau through sport”.

Sport NZ will provide $405,000 a year in funding, $30,000 of which will be used for initiatives that specifically target Maori participation in sport.

Mr Sheldrake said that was a new concept from previous years and Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti representatives would attend a meeting in Wellington this week to learn more about the specifics surrounding what that investment could be used for.

Funding was distributed on a population-based approach, which should provide further impetus for a coordinated regional approach.

“As a community, we face a number of challenges and the population-based model does not always help in addressing those challenges, especially when there is significant evidence of need.”

Sport NZ community sport general manager Geoff Barry said yesterday’s announcement reflected an investment of $25.4 million a year in Regional Sports Trusts (RSTs) and National Sports Organisations (NSOs).

Mr Barry said investment into the network of RSTs had been preserved, because of their key role in leading local and regional delivery systems.

$18.1 million per annum would also be invested into initiatives that have an impact on the strategy’s focus areas of young people, local delivery (particularly in low participation communities) and competitive sport.

“This includes specific investment in coaching, talent development, targeted Auckland initiatives and Maori participation.”

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