QSM for a life serving the church

He credits his wife Mihi of 48 years, as a big part of his life.

He credits his wife Mihi of 48 years, as a big part of his life.

THE MOST REVEREND BROWN TUREI: File picture by Liam Clayton.

IT DID not matter what happened to Archbishop William Brown Turei in his life — it seemed his path was predestined. He describes it as “the hand of God through other people”.

Today he was given recognition for his long service to the church and community by being named as an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) in the New Year’s Honours List.

Humble about the honour, Archbishop Turei said it was a surprise to receive the letter from the Prime Minister and asked if the award could be played down.

“Don’t make it too flowery,” he said.

“It’s really the people around me who deserve it more than I do because I don’t think I have done enough for it.”

Archbishop Turei, 91, is still very active in his capacity as archbishop. In 2005 he was elected as the Bishop of Aotearoa and was the first Ngati Porou person to hold this position. He was consecrated as Primate and Archbishop of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia in 2006 and is highly respected for his ability to relate to people across all races and cultures.

Born in Opotiki in 1924, Archbishop Turei was not expected to survive. Two doctors wrote him off, he said.

“When I survived, my adopted parents actually said, ‘this one’s for the church’. I just can’t put a finger on it but right through my life I was directed. It didn’t matter what I did or who I was associating with.

“I wasn’t wrapped in cotton wool or anything, I was always part of the team and part of the community.

“I even went and enlisted with the military but even there I was kind of steered away from what other soldiers did by those around me — it was amazing.”

He credits meeting the right woman, his wife Mihi of 48 years, as a big part of his life. The couple met when he was a vicar in Gisborne and she was in training college. They have three children — losing their eldest to a brain tumour in 1989 — six grandkids and “a couple of greats”.

Prior to becoming a bishop, he served as the Archdeacon of Waiapu Diocese in Tairawhiti for eight years and as the Bishop of Tairawhiti for 12 years. He also served in the wider community as the chaplain at Hukarere Maori Anglican Girls College for nine years, and as the chaplain of the Napier Prison for four years.

IT DID not matter what happened to Archbishop William Brown Turei in his life — it seemed his path was predestined. He describes it as “the hand of God through other people”.

Today he was given recognition for his long service to the church and community by being named as an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) in the New Year’s Honours List.

Humble about the honour, Archbishop Turei said it was a surprise to receive the letter from the Prime Minister and asked if the award could be played down.

“Don’t make it too flowery,” he said.

“It’s really the people around me who deserve it more than I do because I don’t think I have done enough for it.”

Archbishop Turei, 91, is still very active in his capacity as archbishop. In 2005 he was elected as the Bishop of Aotearoa and was the first Ngati Porou person to hold this position. He was consecrated as Primate and Archbishop of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia in 2006 and is highly respected for his ability to relate to people across all races and cultures.

Born in Opotiki in 1924, Archbishop Turei was not expected to survive. Two doctors wrote him off, he said.

“When I survived, my adopted parents actually said, ‘this one’s for the church’. I just can’t put a finger on it but right through my life I was directed. It didn’t matter what I did or who I was associating with.

“I wasn’t wrapped in cotton wool or anything, I was always part of the team and part of the community.

“I even went and enlisted with the military but even there I was kind of steered away from what other soldiers did by those around me — it was amazing.”

He credits meeting the right woman, his wife Mihi of 48 years, as a big part of his life. The couple met when he was a vicar in Gisborne and she was in training college. They have three children — losing their eldest to a brain tumour in 1989 — six grandkids and “a couple of greats”.

Prior to becoming a bishop, he served as the Archdeacon of Waiapu Diocese in Tairawhiti for eight years and as the Bishop of Tairawhiti for 12 years. He also served in the wider community as the chaplain at Hukarere Maori Anglican Girls College for nine years, and as the chaplain of the Napier Prison for four years.

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Hemi Horne - 1 year ago
Tena koe koro Brown, haven't seen you since your early ministry in the 60s at Maketu amd Pukehina. Wishing you well on your recent distinction and Gos given career over many years. Na, Jim Horne

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