Zoning shuts 17 out of Gisborne Intermediate

School has a small drop in 2016 numbers.

School has a small drop in 2016 numbers.

The finalised Gisborne Intermediate zone. Image supplied

SEVENTEEN out-of-zone students have been denied enrolment at Gisborne Intermediate this year.

The finalised school zone excludes a number of rural-west families and any family located east of the Waimata River.

The Ministry of Education announced it was imposing the zone on the school in September, after they deemed it to be at risk of overcrowding while other intermediates have empty classrooms.

Sixteen out-of-zone enrolments that were accepted were decided via a nationally implemented priority basis.

First priority in GisInt’s case is not applicable, as the school does not run a special programme approved by the secretary. But there are five priority categories the school will adhere to.

Second priority is given to siblings of existing students at the school, third to siblings of former students, fourth to children of previous students, fifth to children of employees or board members, and sixth to all other applicants. The 17 denied enrolments were all priority six.

Principal Glen Udall says when the zone was announced, parents voiced concerns about their choice of school being taken away from them, however things were now looking up.

“We are very excited about the year ahead. Once again we feel privileged to have enrolled an amazing group of young people.”

A drop in the roll

The school’s roll sat at 615 at the end of last year and had dropped to 590 for 2016 — 282 year 7 students and 308 year 8s.

This is despite the MoE recommending GisInt reduce its roll to 565.

In addition to the 16 out-of-zone enrolments accepted, a further nine families from the rural-west community received a one-off special dispensation from the MoE.

The MoE compromise comes after a series of heated public consultation meetings, the last of which was held in November with the school board, rural-west parents and MoE Hawke’s Bay Tairawhiti director of education Marilyn Scott.

The zone means students of the rural-west community are forced to attend other schools that are either total immersion, strongly iwi-based or have received Education Review Office reports described by one parent as “terrible”.

Or travel across town to Ilminster Intermediate, which some parents say is an impractical distance.

Mr Udall says after the last meeting the MoE still declined GisInt’s request to extend the home zone to cater for the rural-west community.

“The only amendment made to the original zone was to include families living in the Ormond School home zone boundary, as this school did not offer year 7 or 8 education.

“The MoE did allow dispensation on the basis that the zoning was introduced in a relatively short time frame.”

Ilminster Intermediate’s make-up might have changed slightly, as a result of the school zone. Principal Peter Ferris says last year the majority of students were from the Kaiti area.

“Our two biggest contributors were Te Wharau School and Kaiti School.”

Last year 140 students used the free bus service provided by the school board.

“They came from the rural west area, Awapuni, Elgin, Te Hapara, Riverdale, Mangapapa and Central. We do have more students enrolled from Wainui for 2016.”·

All schools will start back up again by February 5.

SEVENTEEN out-of-zone students have been denied enrolment at Gisborne Intermediate this year.

The finalised school zone excludes a number of rural-west families and any family located east of the Waimata River.

The Ministry of Education announced it was imposing the zone on the school in September, after they deemed it to be at risk of overcrowding while other intermediates have empty classrooms.

Sixteen out-of-zone enrolments that were accepted were decided via a nationally implemented priority basis.

First priority in GisInt’s case is not applicable, as the school does not run a special programme approved by the secretary. But there are five priority categories the school will adhere to.

Second priority is given to siblings of existing students at the school, third to siblings of former students, fourth to children of previous students, fifth to children of employees or board members, and sixth to all other applicants. The 17 denied enrolments were all priority six.

Principal Glen Udall says when the zone was announced, parents voiced concerns about their choice of school being taken away from them, however things were now looking up.

“We are very excited about the year ahead. Once again we feel privileged to have enrolled an amazing group of young people.”

A drop in the roll

The school’s roll sat at 615 at the end of last year and had dropped to 590 for 2016 — 282 year 7 students and 308 year 8s.

This is despite the MoE recommending GisInt reduce its roll to 565.

In addition to the 16 out-of-zone enrolments accepted, a further nine families from the rural-west community received a one-off special dispensation from the MoE.

The MoE compromise comes after a series of heated public consultation meetings, the last of which was held in November with the school board, rural-west parents and MoE Hawke’s Bay Tairawhiti director of education Marilyn Scott.

The zone means students of the rural-west community are forced to attend other schools that are either total immersion, strongly iwi-based or have received Education Review Office reports described by one parent as “terrible”.

Or travel across town to Ilminster Intermediate, which some parents say is an impractical distance.

Mr Udall says after the last meeting the MoE still declined GisInt’s request to extend the home zone to cater for the rural-west community.

“The only amendment made to the original zone was to include families living in the Ormond School home zone boundary, as this school did not offer year 7 or 8 education.

“The MoE did allow dispensation on the basis that the zoning was introduced in a relatively short time frame.”

Ilminster Intermediate’s make-up might have changed slightly, as a result of the school zone. Principal Peter Ferris says last year the majority of students were from the Kaiti area.

“Our two biggest contributors were Te Wharau School and Kaiti School.”

Last year 140 students used the free bus service provided by the school board.

“They came from the rural west area, Awapuni, Elgin, Te Hapara, Riverdale, Mangapapa and Central. We do have more students enrolled from Wainui for 2016.”·

All schools will start back up again by February 5.

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