Dame Claudia Orange to talk on Treaty of Waitangi

And she believes the post-settlement world holds great promise for iwi and the whole country.

And she believes the post-settlement world holds great promise for iwi and the whole country.

Treaty and Sovereignty, a free public talk by Dame Claudia Orange, will be at Tairawhiti Museum this Thursday, February 18 at 5.30pm. Picture supplied

NEARLY 30 years after her book The Treaty of Waitangi became the go-to reference on the founding document of New Zealand, Dame Claudia Orange is coming to Gisborne to talk about the forces behind the Treaty and issues of sovereignty.

Dame Claudia’s Gisborne talk is hosted by Tairawhiti Museum in conjunction with Te Papa Tongarewa: The Museum of New Zealand’s national services arm, Te Paerangi, and the Ministry of Culture And Heritage.

“This event commemorates the 175th year of the signing of the Treaty Of Waitangi,” the organisers say.

“It provides an opportunity to raise awareness, understanding and dialogue about the Treaty and its impact on our nation historically, currently and looking into the future.”

The talk follows Dame Claudia’s major Waitangi Day task when she opened a $14 million new museum on the Treaty Grounds in Northland. She was the consultant for the inaugural exhibition Ko Waitangi Tenei, a mix of interactive technology and nearly 100 taonga from around the country.

175th anniversary of Treaty signing

In the days before that she was involved with a programme to mark the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty Of Waitangi, held at Te Papa, where she has in recent years worked as head of research. Later this month she steps down to take up a research fellowship.

Now aged 77, Dame Claudia’s research around the Treaty goes back to the 1970s and her 1987 book The Treaty of Waitangi, based on her PhD thesis, is to this day regarded as the seminal work on the subject.

She also published a 2011 edition which, as well as updated information, included new findings about the reasons why Maori did and did not sign the treaty.

Dame Claudia Orange believes that, as well as marking the 175th anniversary, this year is also significant as it is two decades since the treaty settlement process was established.

“Historical settlements have gone some way towards righting the disastrous effects of New Zealand’s history by building Maori community strength,” she said.

“The post-settlement world holds great promise for iwi as well as for the country as a whole.”

NEARLY 30 years after her book The Treaty of Waitangi became the go-to reference on the founding document of New Zealand, Dame Claudia Orange is coming to Gisborne to talk about the forces behind the Treaty and issues of sovereignty.

Dame Claudia’s Gisborne talk is hosted by Tairawhiti Museum in conjunction with Te Papa Tongarewa: The Museum of New Zealand’s national services arm, Te Paerangi, and the Ministry of Culture And Heritage.

“This event commemorates the 175th year of the signing of the Treaty Of Waitangi,” the organisers say.

“It provides an opportunity to raise awareness, understanding and dialogue about the Treaty and its impact on our nation historically, currently and looking into the future.”

The talk follows Dame Claudia’s major Waitangi Day task when she opened a $14 million new museum on the Treaty Grounds in Northland. She was the consultant for the inaugural exhibition Ko Waitangi Tenei, a mix of interactive technology and nearly 100 taonga from around the country.

175th anniversary of Treaty signing

In the days before that she was involved with a programme to mark the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty Of Waitangi, held at Te Papa, where she has in recent years worked as head of research. Later this month she steps down to take up a research fellowship.

Now aged 77, Dame Claudia’s research around the Treaty goes back to the 1970s and her 1987 book The Treaty of Waitangi, based on her PhD thesis, is to this day regarded as the seminal work on the subject.

She also published a 2011 edition which, as well as updated information, included new findings about the reasons why Maori did and did not sign the treaty.

Dame Claudia Orange believes that, as well as marking the 175th anniversary, this year is also significant as it is two decades since the treaty settlement process was established.

“Historical settlements have gone some way towards righting the disastrous effects of New Zealand’s history by building Maori community strength,” she said.

“The post-settlement world holds great promise for iwi as well as for the country as a whole.”

Treaty and Sovereignty, free public talk

A free public talk by Dame Claudia Orange will be held at the Lawson Field Theatre on Thursday, February 18 from 5.30pm.

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