District Court news in brief

Three summaries of local court cases

Three summaries of local court cases

It was “a bit rich” for a man who had previously assaulted his partner to express his distaste at her new partner for allegedly doing the same, Judge Geoffrey Rea told him.

Michael John Hughes, 35, beneficiary, admitted breaching a protection order by challenging her and her partner to a fight. Hughes said he objected to domestic violence he thought was occurring in front of his children with the complainant. He was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within the next 12 months.

Wearing his Black Power gang clothing and accompanied by an associate, Hughes stood outside the woman’s house and challenged the couple to fight, the court heard. He questioned a statement in the police summary claiming he loitered on the lawn at the woman’s house. He maintained he was on the pavement.

Judge Rea noted Hughes had been jailed last year for injuring with intent to injure and common assault of the woman. Hughes said he had no intention of hurting the woman on this occasion — he was concerned her new partner had been physically abusive towards her in front of their four children and he did not want his children exposed to that. The explanation was “a bit rich”, Judge Rea said.

But he accepted the couple’s children had since been removed from the woman’s home due to violence they saw there and placed in alternative care.

“Whether you went around there for the reason you said or whether it was to intimidate, only you will know, “ the judge told Hughes.

The good behaviour bond meant if Hughes got in trouble with violence or gangs again in that time, he would be recalled and resentenced on this matter.

*

Vance Peter Kaiwai, 37, pleaded guilty to common assault, breaches of a protection order and wilful damage. He was convicted and remanded on bail for a report and sentence on April 22.

The charges related to his partner, who he assaulted while she was nursing their baby. Kaiwai burned picture frames and clothing belonging to the woman.

When his ex-partner accused him of stealing food from her place while she was away, Joseph Parekura Robinson became angry and threatened to burn her house down. The threat was made in front of one of the couple’s children.

Robinson pleaded guilty to threatening language and a breach of a protection order. Judge Roberts sentenced him to 150 hours community work.

The judge said the offending was “mean spirited” and “designed to impact on the woman’s mind — as it undoubtedly did”.

Counsel Mark Sceats said Robinson denied taking food from the house. He had gone there to retrieve belongings. He misread communication between him and the complainant, and mistakenly thought she would be more welcoming towards him.

*

Convicted for the 19th time of an offence of the driving-while-forbidden type, a man received 175 hours community work and was spared a mandatory 12 months disqualification. Bruce Joseph William Pickford, 36, pleaded guilty to driving while his licence was revoked.

Granting the reprieve from disqualification, the judge noted Pickford had been routinely stopped. He now had a driver’s licence and relied on his vehicle to get to his job 30km from his home. He had a family to support.

However, the judge did not accept Pickford’s excuse for the offence — that he misunderstood the length of his disqualification. Pickford had far too many prior similar offences for him to have been in any doubt as to how the system worked.

His criminal history was lengthy. He had been convicted 50 times in the past and had served 11 prison terms, the judge said.

He had 18 convictions for breaching community work but the most recent of those was 13 years ago. Pickford had since successfully carried out three further work sentences of “not inconsequential dimension”, the judge said.

Judge Roberts sentenced Pickford to a further 200 work hours in exchange for cancellation of unpaid fines totalling $6500.

The judge told Pickford the remainder of his fines debt — about another $6500 — would be cancelled without further penalty if he completed these sentences without breach.

It was “a bit rich” for a man who had previously assaulted his partner to express his distaste at her new partner for allegedly doing the same, Judge Geoffrey Rea told him.

Michael John Hughes, 35, beneficiary, admitted breaching a protection order by challenging her and her partner to a fight. Hughes said he objected to domestic violence he thought was occurring in front of his children with the complainant. He was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within the next 12 months.

Wearing his Black Power gang clothing and accompanied by an associate, Hughes stood outside the woman’s house and challenged the couple to fight, the court heard. He questioned a statement in the police summary claiming he loitered on the lawn at the woman’s house. He maintained he was on the pavement.

Judge Rea noted Hughes had been jailed last year for injuring with intent to injure and common assault of the woman. Hughes said he had no intention of hurting the woman on this occasion — he was concerned her new partner had been physically abusive towards her in front of their four children and he did not want his children exposed to that. The explanation was “a bit rich”, Judge Rea said.

But he accepted the couple’s children had since been removed from the woman’s home due to violence they saw there and placed in alternative care.

“Whether you went around there for the reason you said or whether it was to intimidate, only you will know, “ the judge told Hughes.

The good behaviour bond meant if Hughes got in trouble with violence or gangs again in that time, he would be recalled and resentenced on this matter.

*

Vance Peter Kaiwai, 37, pleaded guilty to common assault, breaches of a protection order and wilful damage. He was convicted and remanded on bail for a report and sentence on April 22.

The charges related to his partner, who he assaulted while she was nursing their baby. Kaiwai burned picture frames and clothing belonging to the woman.

When his ex-partner accused him of stealing food from her place while she was away, Joseph Parekura Robinson became angry and threatened to burn her house down. The threat was made in front of one of the couple’s children.

Robinson pleaded guilty to threatening language and a breach of a protection order. Judge Roberts sentenced him to 150 hours community work.

The judge said the offending was “mean spirited” and “designed to impact on the woman’s mind — as it undoubtedly did”.

Counsel Mark Sceats said Robinson denied taking food from the house. He had gone there to retrieve belongings. He misread communication between him and the complainant, and mistakenly thought she would be more welcoming towards him.

*

Convicted for the 19th time of an offence of the driving-while-forbidden type, a man received 175 hours community work and was spared a mandatory 12 months disqualification. Bruce Joseph William Pickford, 36, pleaded guilty to driving while his licence was revoked.

Granting the reprieve from disqualification, the judge noted Pickford had been routinely stopped. He now had a driver’s licence and relied on his vehicle to get to his job 30km from his home. He had a family to support.

However, the judge did not accept Pickford’s excuse for the offence — that he misunderstood the length of his disqualification. Pickford had far too many prior similar offences for him to have been in any doubt as to how the system worked.

His criminal history was lengthy. He had been convicted 50 times in the past and had served 11 prison terms, the judge said.

He had 18 convictions for breaching community work but the most recent of those was 13 years ago. Pickford had since successfully carried out three further work sentences of “not inconsequential dimension”, the judge said.

Judge Roberts sentenced Pickford to a further 200 work hours in exchange for cancellation of unpaid fines totalling $6500.

The judge told Pickford the remainder of his fines debt — about another $6500 — would be cancelled without further penalty if he completed these sentences without breach.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Are you worried that too much farmland will be converted to forestry due to the Government's climate change policies?