ECT’s $5m for project

Grant will fund Navigations bridge to slipway.

Grant will fund Navigations bridge to slipway.

BRIDGING THE GAP: How a bridge linking the river walkway to the slipway as part of the Tairawhiti Navigations Project could look. This is an artist’s impression from a presentation made to the council and is not a current design concept. Picture supplied

EASTLAND Community Trust has announced a revised $5 million contribution to the Tairawhiti Navigations Project, which will allow its three major components to proceed.

The trust has announced it will make a revised contribution of $3.4 million and has also undertaken to secure an agreement with the port for slipway repairs to the value of $1.6 million.

The revised grant reflects the changing scope of the work to be completed since Gisborne District Council’s discovery last year that the $3 million river training wall walkway was not feasible. This discovery forced the council and the trust to review the project and the levels of funding required.

Trust general manager Leighton Evans said its support enabled the council to move forward with the design and concept work required for the Turanganui River bridge and larger scale historical interpretations than originally planned.

More importantly, it gave the council a solid base of funding for the construction of these important projects.

“Originally the estimates for these projects were around the $2 million mark, so we are pleased to be able to support the council’s vision to upgrade the remaining projects in the inner harbour area and deliver a project of real significance.”

One of the Trust's largest grants

Mr Evans said the grant was one of the biggest in the trust’s history and he thanked the council for its patience while trustees and management assessed the new application.

“The Navigations Project is a significant one for our community and requires substantial funding from ECT.

“It was important that trustees who make these investment decisions on behalf of our beneficiaries understood the scope of the new works and were clear about the new outcomes the council expects to deliver. That due-diligence process is one our team takes very seriously but the trust now feels it has enough information from the council to reaffirm its wholehearted support of Tairawhiti Navigations and its new scope.

“ECT is looking forward to working with the council to deliver a transformational cultural experience that adds to our visitor offering and that our community will be proud of.”

Council chief executive Judy Campbell said the council was grateful for the funding and looked forward to bringing our “unique cultural stories to life.”

Historical interpretations

Historical interpretations include journeys of founding voyagers Kiwa and Paoa, who sailed waka across the ocean to bring the first Maori settlers here.

Completion of the project will coincide with Te Ha celebrations 2019.

Te Ha is the commemoration of Captain James Cook’s landing and the first meeting of Maori and Europeans in 1769.

Mrs Campbell told the council the cost of the project had been revised from the original $12 million to $8.7 million. She said today ECT had been asked to fund the slipway, walkway, bridge and historic interpretations 100 percent, while the council funded the inner harbour component at $3.7 million and later work like connecting pathways and potential work on the railway bridge.

Those projects had not yet been scoped and would be signed off later.

The council would be looking to other funders for elements of the project. For example, the Titirangi restoration work lent itself to a number of potential funding applications. The council had been very successful in obtaining that sort of funding, with more than $11 million raised in the last four years through funding applications.

EASTLAND Community Trust has announced a revised $5 million contribution to the Tairawhiti Navigations Project, which will allow its three major components to proceed.

The trust has announced it will make a revised contribution of $3.4 million and has also undertaken to secure an agreement with the port for slipway repairs to the value of $1.6 million.

The revised grant reflects the changing scope of the work to be completed since Gisborne District Council’s discovery last year that the $3 million river training wall walkway was not feasible. This discovery forced the council and the trust to review the project and the levels of funding required.

Trust general manager Leighton Evans said its support enabled the council to move forward with the design and concept work required for the Turanganui River bridge and larger scale historical interpretations than originally planned.

More importantly, it gave the council a solid base of funding for the construction of these important projects.

“Originally the estimates for these projects were around the $2 million mark, so we are pleased to be able to support the council’s vision to upgrade the remaining projects in the inner harbour area and deliver a project of real significance.”

One of the Trust's largest grants

Mr Evans said the grant was one of the biggest in the trust’s history and he thanked the council for its patience while trustees and management assessed the new application.

“The Navigations Project is a significant one for our community and requires substantial funding from ECT.

“It was important that trustees who make these investment decisions on behalf of our beneficiaries understood the scope of the new works and were clear about the new outcomes the council expects to deliver. That due-diligence process is one our team takes very seriously but the trust now feels it has enough information from the council to reaffirm its wholehearted support of Tairawhiti Navigations and its new scope.

“ECT is looking forward to working with the council to deliver a transformational cultural experience that adds to our visitor offering and that our community will be proud of.”

Council chief executive Judy Campbell said the council was grateful for the funding and looked forward to bringing our “unique cultural stories to life.”

Historical interpretations

Historical interpretations include journeys of founding voyagers Kiwa and Paoa, who sailed waka across the ocean to bring the first Maori settlers here.

Completion of the project will coincide with Te Ha celebrations 2019.

Te Ha is the commemoration of Captain James Cook’s landing and the first meeting of Maori and Europeans in 1769.

Mrs Campbell told the council the cost of the project had been revised from the original $12 million to $8.7 million. She said today ECT had been asked to fund the slipway, walkway, bridge and historic interpretations 100 percent, while the council funded the inner harbour component at $3.7 million and later work like connecting pathways and potential work on the railway bridge.

Those projects had not yet been scoped and would be signed off later.

The council would be looking to other funders for elements of the project. For example, the Titirangi restoration work lent itself to a number of potential funding applications. The council had been very successful in obtaining that sort of funding, with more than $11 million raised in the last four years through funding applications.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the new identity and wellbeing focus of Trust Tairawhiti (formerly Eastland Community Trust)?