Less than 2 percent hike for most rates

And many in Gisborne will see their rate bill fall.

And many in Gisborne will see their rate bill fall.

File picture

A CLEAR majority of Gisborne ratepayers will not have to face a rate increase of more than 2 percent next financial year and many will see their rates bill fall, says Gisborne District Council chief executive Judy Campbell.

She was speaking at an extraordinary meeting of Gisborne District Council, at which a consultation document for the 2016-17 annual plan was approved.

Mrs Campbell said legislation changes this year meant the council did not have to run annual plan hearings and submissions but the council had still held a series of community meetings. It still had to put out this consultation document.

Last year there had been 9600 ratepayers with zero to 2 percent increases. This year nearly 13,000 people were within those figures. About another 5000 or 6000 would actually get a decrease.

Last year the council had concentrated on the small number of people who had more than 2 percent increases.

“Eighty two percent of your people, including targeted rates, get 2 percent increase or less”, she said. This was “phenomenal”.

Brian Wilson congratulated the staff and said anyone reading the document could get the information needed.

Mayor Meng Foon said the council and staff should be congratulated for active programmes in terms of what was projected for next year,

Magnificent work achieved

It was a reflection of the work programme in the 10-year plan and there was some magnificent work, especially in areas of business structure and economic development like the Waipaoa River Control Scheme and Makauri aquifer recharge that were all part of economic development.

Businesses were telling the council they had to make sure that Gisborne was the best liveable place in the whole world, because when it came to attracting people here their first perception needed to be positive.

People were still talking about the War Memorial Theatre and the Cenotaph was one of the best in the whole of New Zealand.

The council had provided infrastructure for Aerodrome Road which was full now with buildings going up left, right and centre. The council was examining silly rules to make sure people could actually do business as easily as possible.
Hearings chairman Alan Davidson had told him there had not been any hearings — the reason for that was the council was more future driven and visionary.

“We are actually guiding where our district is going, not developers. Just imagine if they wanted to build another factory where Heinz Wattie was.”

“I am very proud of us all in presenting this Tairawhiti First 2016-17 document,” said Mr Foon.

• The Tairawhiti First 2016-17 consultation document is printed in today’s Gisborne Herald and will be available on the council’s website and at service centres.

The period for receiving feedback on it is from today to May 6. Final adoption of the annual plan will be on June 30 and the rates will be struck at that time.

A CLEAR majority of Gisborne ratepayers will not have to face a rate increase of more than 2 percent next financial year and many will see their rates bill fall, says Gisborne District Council chief executive Judy Campbell.

She was speaking at an extraordinary meeting of Gisborne District Council, at which a consultation document for the 2016-17 annual plan was approved.

Mrs Campbell said legislation changes this year meant the council did not have to run annual plan hearings and submissions but the council had still held a series of community meetings. It still had to put out this consultation document.

Last year there had been 9600 ratepayers with zero to 2 percent increases. This year nearly 13,000 people were within those figures. About another 5000 or 6000 would actually get a decrease.

Last year the council had concentrated on the small number of people who had more than 2 percent increases.

“Eighty two percent of your people, including targeted rates, get 2 percent increase or less”, she said. This was “phenomenal”.

Brian Wilson congratulated the staff and said anyone reading the document could get the information needed.

Mayor Meng Foon said the council and staff should be congratulated for active programmes in terms of what was projected for next year,

Magnificent work achieved

It was a reflection of the work programme in the 10-year plan and there was some magnificent work, especially in areas of business structure and economic development like the Waipaoa River Control Scheme and Makauri aquifer recharge that were all part of economic development.

Businesses were telling the council they had to make sure that Gisborne was the best liveable place in the whole world, because when it came to attracting people here their first perception needed to be positive.

People were still talking about the War Memorial Theatre and the Cenotaph was one of the best in the whole of New Zealand.

The council had provided infrastructure for Aerodrome Road which was full now with buildings going up left, right and centre. The council was examining silly rules to make sure people could actually do business as easily as possible.
Hearings chairman Alan Davidson had told him there had not been any hearings — the reason for that was the council was more future driven and visionary.

“We are actually guiding where our district is going, not developers. Just imagine if they wanted to build another factory where Heinz Wattie was.”

“I am very proud of us all in presenting this Tairawhiti First 2016-17 document,” said Mr Foon.

• The Tairawhiti First 2016-17 consultation document is printed in today’s Gisborne Herald and will be available on the council’s website and at service centres.

The period for receiving feedback on it is from today to May 6. Final adoption of the annual plan will be on June 30 and the rates will be struck at that time.

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