Library frontage plan changes

Main entrance to be from Bright Street.

Main entrance to be from Bright Street.

Artist’s impression of how the HB Williams Memorial Library will look after the extension and Wal and the Dog move from their present site on the riverbank. Picture supplied

A NUMBER of changes have been made to the front entrance in extension plans for the H.B. Williams Memorial Library.

The Future Tairawhiti committee was shown an updated artist’s impression while discussing a recommendation from the library project advisory group that the existing building would not need earthquake strengthening.

Planning and development group manager Nedine Thatcher-Swann said the main difference in the new impression was in the large upright structures at the entrance to the library.

They now represented toki, which were in effect Maori writing tools used as in carving. They would show the transformation over time from quills to bar codes and books.

The screen shading on the window side where people entered was now going to have William Williams’ signature on the Treaty of Waitangi.

Seats same as Oneroa cycle/walkway

The seats in the front were the same as those used on the Oneroa cycle/walkway. They would be laminated to match the laminations of the building. There was better treatment around the stained glass window, which had been lifted to face the northern side and get more sunshine.

The artist would have to complete some of the panels because there were doorways in the present position that would not be at the new site.

The quiet space on the second floor was intended to be a quiet place where people could sit and have a full view of the library.

These were artist’s impressions. There would still be discussions around things like the type of flax plants to be planted.

Chief executive Judy Campbell said the Bright Street entrance would be the main entrance to the library.
Councillors should note that notwithstanding a letter to the Herald supposedly from the Dog, saying how much he liked to stand by the river, the statues of Wal and Dog would stand where they were meant to be at the library’s main entrance.

Maori and English versions of the Treaty

Both Maori and English versions of the Treaty would be displayed. It was the English version that William Williams had signed.

The committee is recommending that the council confirm the project group’s recommendation not to proceed with seismic strengthening of the existing building, which will create a saving of $275,000.

A NUMBER of changes have been made to the front entrance in extension plans for the H.B. Williams Memorial Library.

The Future Tairawhiti committee was shown an updated artist’s impression while discussing a recommendation from the library project advisory group that the existing building would not need earthquake strengthening.

Planning and development group manager Nedine Thatcher-Swann said the main difference in the new impression was in the large upright structures at the entrance to the library.

They now represented toki, which were in effect Maori writing tools used as in carving. They would show the transformation over time from quills to bar codes and books.

The screen shading on the window side where people entered was now going to have William Williams’ signature on the Treaty of Waitangi.

Seats same as Oneroa cycle/walkway

The seats in the front were the same as those used on the Oneroa cycle/walkway. They would be laminated to match the laminations of the building. There was better treatment around the stained glass window, which had been lifted to face the northern side and get more sunshine.

The artist would have to complete some of the panels because there were doorways in the present position that would not be at the new site.

The quiet space on the second floor was intended to be a quiet place where people could sit and have a full view of the library.

These were artist’s impressions. There would still be discussions around things like the type of flax plants to be planted.

Chief executive Judy Campbell said the Bright Street entrance would be the main entrance to the library.
Councillors should note that notwithstanding a letter to the Herald supposedly from the Dog, saying how much he liked to stand by the river, the statues of Wal and Dog would stand where they were meant to be at the library’s main entrance.

Maori and English versions of the Treaty

Both Maori and English versions of the Treaty would be displayed. It was the English version that William Williams had signed.

The committee is recommending that the council confirm the project group’s recommendation not to proceed with seismic strengthening of the existing building, which will create a saving of $275,000.

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Tony Gray - 3 years ago
I enter this discussion cold as this is the first information I have seen regarding alterations to the library.
Can I remind the council, the project group and the public that the library was designed by (at the time local) architect Colin Pilbrow, and that the building won national architectural awards for its design. The building was ahead of its time and deserves to be continuously recognised for that.
I would not like to think the location of Wal and Dog have taken precedence over the building itself.
Sadly the artist's impression looks very amateurish by today's standards. The building in the artist's impression itself displays none of the existing language expressed by the building as it has stood over the past many years.
I do appreciate seats from the walkway, the massive significance of Wal and Dog, and even more so the use of panel art to tell stories of Poverty Bay Heritage.
But please don't let those superficial elements overshadow the importance of the building to our local heritage.
The building as illustrated and presented is disappointing.

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