Rocket Lab launches improved Mahia internet

Spin-offs start to flow to the wider Mahia/Nuhaka community.

Spin-offs start to flow to the wider Mahia/Nuhaka community.

SITE COUNTDOWN: Civil works are nearing completion at Rocket Lab’s Onenui Station Mahia launch site, at the end of the peninsula overlooking Portland Island. Picture by More FM/Scott McSloy

MAHIA residents now have access to an improved internet connection. The new high-grade link will provide Rocket Lab with fast, reliable and consistent services to their launch site and offers spin-off benefits to the wider Mahia/Nuhaka community.

Rocket Lab already has the Mahia area covered with high-speed internet but will be augmenting the capacity of the backhaul into the area.

The new high-grade link will feed the Mahia, Nuhaka and Morere areas. Residents will experience speeds more associated with urban areas. Improved internet speed should be noticeable within the next week.

Meanwhile, civil works are nearing completion at Rocket Lab’s Onenui Station Mahia launch site. To date 3.5km of roading has been upgraded and the vehicle-processing hangar installation completed, with most of the work carried out by local contractors.

Rocket Lab’s mission

Rocket Lab’s mission is to make satellite launching accessible and affordable. Using the Electron Launch Vehicle, Rocket Lab will launch small satellites used for imaging and communications technology into space. These provide services including optimised crop monitoring, improved weather reporting, internet from space, natural disaster prediction, up-to date maritime data and search and rescue services.

Electron is Rocket Lab’s latest rocket, and is an entirely carbon-composite vehicle that uses Rocket Lab’s Rutherford engines for its main propulsion system. Rocket Lab recently announced the Rutherford engine makes use of electric turbo-pumps and that the majority of its components are 3D-printed.

Electron is 16m long, 1.20m in diameter and has a lift-off mass of 12,800kg.

The rocket is capable of delivering payloads of up to 150kg to a 500km sun-synchronous orbit, which is the target range for the high-growth constellation-satellite market.

Wairoa’s Rocket Lab journey started in September when the company lodged a resource consent application for a satellite launch site at Onenui Station, on the southern tip of the Mahia Peninsula, which is owned by the Tawapata South Maori Incorporation. — Wairoa Star

MAHIA residents now have access to an improved internet connection. The new high-grade link will provide Rocket Lab with fast, reliable and consistent services to their launch site and offers spin-off benefits to the wider Mahia/Nuhaka community.

Rocket Lab already has the Mahia area covered with high-speed internet but will be augmenting the capacity of the backhaul into the area.

The new high-grade link will feed the Mahia, Nuhaka and Morere areas. Residents will experience speeds more associated with urban areas. Improved internet speed should be noticeable within the next week.

Meanwhile, civil works are nearing completion at Rocket Lab’s Onenui Station Mahia launch site. To date 3.5km of roading has been upgraded and the vehicle-processing hangar installation completed, with most of the work carried out by local contractors.

Rocket Lab’s mission

Rocket Lab’s mission is to make satellite launching accessible and affordable. Using the Electron Launch Vehicle, Rocket Lab will launch small satellites used for imaging and communications technology into space. These provide services including optimised crop monitoring, improved weather reporting, internet from space, natural disaster prediction, up-to date maritime data and search and rescue services.

Electron is Rocket Lab’s latest rocket, and is an entirely carbon-composite vehicle that uses Rocket Lab’s Rutherford engines for its main propulsion system. Rocket Lab recently announced the Rutherford engine makes use of electric turbo-pumps and that the majority of its components are 3D-printed.

Electron is 16m long, 1.20m in diameter and has a lift-off mass of 12,800kg.

The rocket is capable of delivering payloads of up to 150kg to a 500km sun-synchronous orbit, which is the target range for the high-growth constellation-satellite market.

Wairoa’s Rocket Lab journey started in September when the company lodged a resource consent application for a satellite launch site at Onenui Station, on the southern tip of the Mahia Peninsula, which is owned by the Tawapata South Maori Incorporation. — Wairoa Star

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Roger - 2 years ago
An excellent and exciting development for the Wairoa District and Gisborne.

Aroha Burrows - 2 years ago
Please don't ruin this homeland of ours. Maui fished this place up and in some history stories he lived at Mahia. Also, Disney has a new movie coming out about Maui. I hope all this will not disturb the beautiful seafood this place has given the Maori and Pakeha alike - there is no taste like it anywhere.

Chris Williams - 2 years ago
Aroha, the country was not "fished up" by some imaginary being. This is solely an uneducated explanation of the proposed beginning of this country.
People like you consistently stand in the way of progress by siting apparent 'cultural beliefs' which are unproven.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    ​Do you think Gladstone Road Bridge should have its concrete parapet walls converted to steel railings on one or both of its sides as part of the upgrade and widening under way?

    See also:

    Opinion: