Gisborne March for Moko

Gisborne’s march is on Monday June 27 at 9am, coinciding with other rallies on the day the accused are sentenced.

Gisborne’s march is on Monday June 27 at 9am, coinciding with other rallies on the day the accused are sentenced.

GISBORNE people will join a nationwide demonstration of solidarity as they march in memory of toddler Moko Rangitoheriri.

Moko’s death, the abuse he suffered and the charges his killers admitted have stirred up outrage across New Zealand.

Justice for Moko rallies have been organised in all major New Zealand cities, with 14 listed so far on social media site Facebook.

A hikoi in memory of Moko will take place in Wairoa tomorrow. Marchers are asked to gather at Wairoa Lighthouse at 12.30pm for a 1pm start.

Gisborne’s march is on Monday June 27 at 9am, coinciding with other rallies on the day Tania Shailer, 26, and David Haerewa, 43, are sentenced in the High Court at Rotorua.

Justice for Moko Gisborne has been organised by Kelly Ennis-Reynolds and Farrah Murphy in collaboration with the Sensible Sentencing Trust.

The march will end at the Gisborne courthouse. Event organisers are looking for guest speakers and want interested individuals to contact.

Protesters are asked to wear dark blue, a colour symbolic of the bruises associated with child abuse.

About 200 Gisborne people have already signed up to the online event page, with more than 1000 invited.

Cruel and prolonged abuse

Three-year-old Moko died on August 10, 2015 after what has been described as cruel and prolonged abuse at the hands of his carers.

Outrage followed revelations that Child, Youth and Family had been informed of risks to the children in the care of the accused and that the charges would be downgraded from murder to manslaughter.

During an interview on TV3, Moko’s mother, Nicola Dally-Paki said she was disappointed by CYF and believed manslaughter charges were inadequate.

Shailer contacted CYF only days before Moko’s death, saying she believed Moko’s siblings would not be safe in returning to Ms Dally-Paki’s care.

National personalities have weighed in on news of Moko’s death and the downgraded charges.

“No way in hell is this manslaughter. Our laws on child abuse need a review before we fail another child,” said Seven Sharp’s Toni Street.

Journalist and radio host Duncan Garner used the event to highlight the concerning child abuse statistics.

“We kill our children in record numbers. It’s shameful. The Kahui twins, Nia Glassie, James Whakaruru and now the death of this innocent three-year-old boy. It’s well past time to stand up and confront the issue. This case should be used to send a message.”

Dr Ruth Gammon, director of the Wellington Psychology Clinic at Massey University’s School of Psychology, has reported that on average one child is killed every five weeks. Most are under five years old and 90 percent die at the hands of someone they know.

These findings reflect New Zealand’s position in holding the fifth-worst record of child abuse out of 31 countries in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

GISBORNE people will join a nationwide demonstration of solidarity as they march in memory of toddler Moko Rangitoheriri.

Moko’s death, the abuse he suffered and the charges his killers admitted have stirred up outrage across New Zealand.

Justice for Moko rallies have been organised in all major New Zealand cities, with 14 listed so far on social media site Facebook.

A hikoi in memory of Moko will take place in Wairoa tomorrow. Marchers are asked to gather at Wairoa Lighthouse at 12.30pm for a 1pm start.

Gisborne’s march is on Monday June 27 at 9am, coinciding with other rallies on the day Tania Shailer, 26, and David Haerewa, 43, are sentenced in the High Court at Rotorua.

Justice for Moko Gisborne has been organised by Kelly Ennis-Reynolds and Farrah Murphy in collaboration with the Sensible Sentencing Trust.

The march will end at the Gisborne courthouse. Event organisers are looking for guest speakers and want interested individuals to contact.

Protesters are asked to wear dark blue, a colour symbolic of the bruises associated with child abuse.

About 200 Gisborne people have already signed up to the online event page, with more than 1000 invited.

Cruel and prolonged abuse

Three-year-old Moko died on August 10, 2015 after what has been described as cruel and prolonged abuse at the hands of his carers.

Outrage followed revelations that Child, Youth and Family had been informed of risks to the children in the care of the accused and that the charges would be downgraded from murder to manslaughter.

During an interview on TV3, Moko’s mother, Nicola Dally-Paki said she was disappointed by CYF and believed manslaughter charges were inadequate.

Shailer contacted CYF only days before Moko’s death, saying she believed Moko’s siblings would not be safe in returning to Ms Dally-Paki’s care.

National personalities have weighed in on news of Moko’s death and the downgraded charges.

“No way in hell is this manslaughter. Our laws on child abuse need a review before we fail another child,” said Seven Sharp’s Toni Street.

Journalist and radio host Duncan Garner used the event to highlight the concerning child abuse statistics.

“We kill our children in record numbers. It’s shameful. The Kahui twins, Nia Glassie, James Whakaruru and now the death of this innocent three-year-old boy. It’s well past time to stand up and confront the issue. This case should be used to send a message.”

Dr Ruth Gammon, director of the Wellington Psychology Clinic at Massey University’s School of Psychology, has reported that on average one child is killed every five weeks. Most are under five years old and 90 percent die at the hands of someone they know.

These findings reflect New Zealand’s position in holding the fifth-worst record of child abuse out of 31 countries in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    How do you rate National’s election-year Budget?